Missouri’s Civil War: a State Divided

St. Louis Public Radio’s Maria Altman reports during the 150th anniversary of the Civil War this year on major events that took place in Missouri. The Show Me State had more battles on its soil than any other states except Virginia and Tennessee.

 

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Culture/History
4:04 pm
Fri May 17, 2013

Annual Mary Meachum Freedom Crossing Event Celebrates 150th Emancipation Proclamation Anniversary

An excerpt of an Emancipation Proclamation transcript printed in the September 23, 1862 National Republican, Washington D.C.
(via Wikimedia Commons)

The Mary Meachum Freedom Crossing, on the banks of the Mississippi River in St. Louis, will be turned into a Civil War training camp tomorrow at the 11th annual Freedom Crossing Event Celebration.

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Cityscape
3:00 pm
Fri October 26, 2012

Missouri’s Contentious Role In Civil War Explored Through Music

A cannon sits on what is now Wilson's Creek National Battlefield near Springfield, MO
(via Flickr/Jo Naylor)

As a border state during the Civil War, the state of Missouri was home to numerous battles and skirmishes.  The state’s residents were divided, supporting both sides of the war.

Barbara Harbach is the composer of a new work called “A State Divided – Missouri Symphony for String Orchestra.”  The piece has three movements and each represents a major chapter in the history of Missouri’s role in the Civil War. 

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10:09 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Re-tracing the steps of a Civil War photographer

Lead in text: 
NPR's Claire O'Neill takes a forward-thinking approach to historical photographs. See for yourself via the link.
Today's 150th anniversary of the Battle of Antietam got us thinking: What if Civil War photographer Alexander Gardner could revisit some of the original sites he photographed? If he used his equipment today, what would the images look like? That is: How have the landscapes changed - or stayed the same?
Missouri & The Civil War
6:35 am
Fri November 11, 2011

Bringing the Civil War in Missouri to life

Six-year-old Jimmie Johnston served as a Union “powder monkey” on a gunboat during the Civil War.
(The Midland Montly Magazine, 1865)

The Missouri History Museum is opening a new exhibit Saturday called “The Civil War in Missouri.”

There’s a lot of ground to cover in a state that was bitterly divided by the war and saw more than 1,200 battles and skirmishes.

But the museum, founded just one year after the Civil War ended, has a treasure trove of artifacts from the era that bring the conflict to life.

St. Louis Public Radio’s Maria Altman got a sneak peak.

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Battle of Wilson's Creek
6:35 am
Wed August 10, 2011

The Battle of Wilson's Creek: remembering the 150th anniversary

A cannon stands on what is now Wilson's Creek National Battlefield. The area was, 150 years ago on Aug. 10, the site of the Battle of Wilson's Creek.
(via Flickr/Jo Naylor)

"It's not the large, organized, and, later in the war, the drafted armies that you see on the East Coast. This is very personal. You know, you better know who your neighbor is, and where their sympathies lie, or they're going to be turning you in, so to speak."

- Connie Langum, National Park historian on the nature of Civil War battles in Missouri

Today marks the 150-year anniversary of the Battle of Wilson's Creek near Springfield, Mo.

It was the second major battle of the Civil War, after Bull Run, and the first major battle to take place west of the Mississippi River.

About 2,500 men died or were wounded at the site, which is now known as Wilson's Creek National Battlefield.

St. Louis Public Radio's Maria Altman spoke with National Park historian Connie Langum about what happened on that day a century and a half ago, and how it will be remembered this week.

Listen to their conversation above.

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Morning round-up
9:22 am
Thu July 7, 2011

Morning headlines: Thursday, July 7, 2011

Ameren’s 2,400-megawatt plant near Labadie, Mo. is the state’s largest coal-fired power plant.
(Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio)

Ameren's plan to dump coal waste moves forward

Ameren’s plan for a coal waste dump in an eastern Missouri floodway  has moved a step forward.

Ameren operates a power plant along the Missouri River in the Franklin County town of Labadie and dumps coal ash into two ponds. Those ponds are near capacity and Ameren wants to fill the river bottom with coal waste and surround it with a 20-foot-tall levee.  

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Missouri & The Civil War
8:50 am
Wed June 22, 2011

Missouri Hopes For Boost From Civil War Tourism

St. Louis, whose location on the Mississippi River made it a hub for the sale of slaves, marked the Civil War sesquicentennial by re-enacting a slave auction in January. Missouri officials hope the anniversary will draw more attention to the state's Civil War history.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 21, 2011 12:01 am

With 2011 marking the 150th anniversary of the Civil War's beginning, tourists and history buffs are expected to travel to famous battle sites, such as Gettysburg and Bull Run, in record numbers. Missouri would like some of that attention — only Virginia and Tennessee contain more Civil War battle sites.

Missouri was on the western front of the Civil War. The Battle of Wilson's Creek was fought there; in total, more than 1,000 skirmishes and battles took place in the state.

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Battle of Boonville
4:02 pm
Fri June 17, 2011

Thousands of visitors expected at anniversary of Civil War battle

The Battle of Boonville, Missouri, sketched by Orlando C. Richardson. A reenactment will take place this weekend, on the 150th anniversary of the battle.
(via Wikimedia Commons)

Thousands of spectators are expected in Boonville, Mo. this weekend for the 150th anniversary of one of the Civil War’s first battles.

The Battle of Boonville took place June 17, 1861 as Confederate-leaning Missouri Guard members met Union troops.

Boonville, a town of about 6,400 is expecting 700 re-enactors and 10,000 to 20,000 visitors.

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Missouri & The Civil War
6:35 am
Tue May 10, 2011

Missouri's Civil War tipping point: 150 years after The Camp Jackson Affair

In the first weeks of the Civil War Missouri tried to remain neutral.

But May 10, 1861 was the tipping point.

In what came to be known as the Camp Jackson Affair, federal troops captured members of Missouri’s militia and killed 28 civilians in the chaos that followed.

St. Louis Public Radio’s Maria Altman reports on what happened that day 150 years ago and how it forced Missouri into the war.

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Missouri's Civil War Heritage Foundation
5:18 pm
Fri April 8, 2011

Foundation raising funds for Mo. trail tracing Grant's Civil War path

In this photograph taken in the spring of 1865, Ulysses S. Grant is seen wearing a black mourning band around his left arm in remembrance of the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln, which occurred five days after Lee’s surrender at Appomattox.
(via Wikimedia Commons/U.S. Library of Congress)

Missouri's Civil War Heritage Foundation is trying to raise money for a driving trail exploring Ulysses S. Grant's path through the state in the first year of the Civil War.

The group is hosting a fundraising dinner next Wednesday at the Missouri Athletic Club in St. Louis.

Foundation president Gregory Wolk says they're working on a segment of the Grant Trail in St. Louis County and in talks with other counties about future projects. 

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