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The image of Bobby Orr flying through the air after scoring the winning goal in the 1970 Stanley Cup Final was on a wall of The Geyer Inn a few years ago. O'Neil said it's a "great photo" that "kind of captures the frustration" for the Blues.
Wayne Pratt | St. Louis Public Radio

Author Dan O'Neill Reflects On Blues' History And Current Success

A nearly five-decade wait for hockey fans throughout the St. Louis region ends Monday. The Blues will return to the Stanley Cup Final for the first time since 1970. They will be in Boston to take on the Bruins, the same team that knocked out the Blues the last time they made it this far. Author Dan O’Neill’s connection to the National Hockey League team goes way back. He was working as a busboy in the old arena club during that 1970 final and was in the building earlier this month when the...

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Sharing America

Sharing America: Profiles

A series about women of color doing local work that highlights an issue of national importance.

Admit it: When you think of chess, an image immediately forms in your mind of two older men, possibly bearded, hunched over a board in a dimly-lit tournament hall. One of the players may be ominously declaring, “Check.” Make no mistake, though: This view is decidedly dated, and the United States Chess Federation (U.S. Chess) is working hard to permanently bury it as we work to show that chess is a game that welcomes anyone — regardless of gender, national origin, age or special circumstances.

Roger Ideker's farm in St. Joseph, Mo. during the 2011 Missouri River flood. Ideker is the lead plaintiff in the suit against the corps.
Ideker Farms

U.S. Sens. Josh Hawley and Roy Blunt want the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to stop focusing on protecting wildlife in the Missouri River and instead focus on flood control and navigation, a move that environmentalists are calling misguided.

In 2004, the Corps of Engineers changed its management strategy for the Missouri River to protect two endangered species of birds and one fish, the pallid sturgeon. However, landowners near the river have alleged that prioritizing wildlife over flood protection has caused them extensive property damage from major floods.

Outside the Enterprise Center on 05/22/19 , the day after The St. Louis Blues defeated the San Jose Sharks to go to the Stanley Cup Final.
Corinne Ruff | St. Louis Public Radio

So far this year, the St. Louis Blues have generated nearly $4 million in city revenue. And now that the hockey team is headed to the Stanley Cup Final, the city expects an extra financial bump.

That’s according to estimates from St. Louis Budget Director Paul Payne. He said the city will predominantly benefit from direct revenue brought in from sales taxes on tickets. Indirect money from spending on things like concessions, parking, restaurants and hotels will also contribute to the city’s budget.

“I’d estimated back at the beginning of the playoffs you’d see the three games would probably be somewhere in the area of $300,000, which would go up with each succeeding series,” he said.

Thousands Call Missouri's Adult Abuse Hotline, But Only Some Get Through

May 22, 2019

Last year, Missouri's hotline for reports about abuse of elderly adults, as well as abuse of residents with disabilities, answered only half of its calls.

More than 17,000 callers heard the message, "All agents are busy, please call back," and the calls were disconnected.

"Flores Mexicanas"painting by Alfredo Ramos Martinez in storage at the Missouri Historical Society's Library and Research Center prior to conservation.
Photo courtesy of the Missouri Historical Society

Mexico City, Mexico, is the special spot where famed aviators Anne and Charles Lindbergh met and where their relationship formed. And in 1929, then-president Emilio Portes Gil gifted the celebrity couple the 9-by-12-foot “Flores Mexicanas” masterpiece by renowned Mexican artist Alfredo Ramos Martinez as a wedding gift.

Extravagant, right? St. Louisans will also get a chance to admire the painting as part of the Missouri Historical Society’s upcoming “Flores Mexicanas: A Lindbergh Love Story” exhibit, on view June 1 through Sept. 2.

The HillBenders will open for The Who at Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre Thursday night.
The HillBenders

English rock band The Who first released “Tommy,” the wildly successful rock opera, on May 23, 1969 – exactly 50 years ago this Thursday, when Springfield, Missouri-based bluegrass band The HillBenders will open for The Who at Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre.

It might seem an unlikely concert pairing, except that The HillBenders’ 2015 album is a full-length Tommy tribute, bluegrass-opry style.

St. Louis on the Air producer Evie Hemphill caught up with Jim Rea, the group’s guitarist and musical director, as he and the rest of the HillBenders anticipated sharing a stage with The Who.

Updated, 10:30 a.m. Thursday: The meeting this week ended with a commitment to resist the plan approved in February at the General Conference; the church leaders present are not yet calling for a split. Some churches will continue to marry and ordain LGBTQ members.

The original post continues below.

The United Methodist Church is in crisis.

In February, the General Conference of the church held a special session in St. Louis, Missouri, to decide whether to allow marriage and ordination for its LGBTQ members.

Fans celebrate amid falling streamers after the St. Louis Blues defeated the San Jose Sharks 5-1 on Tuesday night, sending the team back to the Stanley Cup Final for the first time in 49 years. May 22, 2019.
Rachel Lippmann | St. Louis Public Radio

Enterprise Center and much of St. Louis erupted in bedlam Tuesday night as the final horn sounded, sending the St. Louis Blues to the 2019 Stanley Cup Final.

The Blues beat the San Jose Sharks in spectacular fashion, scoring two power-play goals and an empty-netter to win 5-1. It sets up a rematch of the 1970 final, which the Boston Bruins won in four.

ForTheCultureSTL.com creater Ohun Ashe wants to help circulate funds in St. Louis' African American community by promoting black-owned businesses and hosting events like the pop-up shop on Wednesday.
Ohun Ashe

Before the death of Michael Brown Jr., entrepreneur Ohun Ashe said she did not see many black-owned businesses in her community.

In 2014, Ashe was in the streets of Ferguson and St. Louis protesting the killing of Brown. She recorded video footage of scenes between police and protestors and even the moment when she was arrested and thrown into a paddy wagon. Once demonstrations died down, Ashe was determined to understand her role in the protests.

It was not until 2016 when Ashe envisioned providing the St. Louis community with an online black business directory, ForTheCultureSTL.com.

A flame lit on the International Space Station.
Eli Chen | St. Louis Public Radio

NASA scientists are lighting flames on the International Space Station to help a Washington University engineer learn how soot forms from fire.

The NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio is conducting the flame experiments remotely. The space agency is sending data to researchers who are exploring ways to eliminate soot so that fuel can be burned more cleanly.

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St. Louis on the Air

Tuesday: 'Historic Missouri Roadsides' Offers Best Routes For Exploring Missouri

St. Louis Public Radio editor Holly Edgell will talk with author Bill Hart about the wide-ranging possibilities for touring the state.

St. Louis Public Radio Investigates: East St. Louis' Murder Rate

Unraveling East St. Louis' Murder Rate And The Legacy Of Unsolved Homicides

In this series, investigative reporters Beth Hundsdorfer and George Pawlaczyk used public records to compile a database of all 453 homicides that occurred between 2000-2008 in East St. Louis.