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Blues Stanley Cup Parade Roars Through St. Louis As Rain Turns To Sunshine

Floats and fire trucks make their way down Market Street during the Blues championship parade in downtown St. Louis on Saturday.
Nick Schnelle | Special to St. Louis Public Radio
Floats and fire trucks make their way down Market Street during the Blues championship parade in downtown St. Louis on Saturday.

St. Louis Blues fans by the tens of thousands gathered downtown Saturday to watch their team celebrate its first Stanley Cup victory.

The rain let up just as the parade began at noon. Floats, which featured individual players and their families, started at 18th Street and moved slowly down Market Street toward Gateway Arch National Park.

Fans’ excitement over winning the Cup brought them to downtown long before the parade began. Some, such as Jeff Pleimann of Oakville, arrived Friday night and claimed a spot for about 50 family members and friends.

“I’ve watched every game, we’ve had a party every game, all four series,” Pleimann said. “It was important that we all be together in one spot.”

Overcast skies and occasional rain didn’t stop the celebration. Retiring Blues national anthem singer Charles Glenn performed before the rally and several Blues players spoke, including captain and defenseman Alex Pietrangelo.

“It’s been a long, wild ride. I mean, we’ve been working pretty hard to get to this point,” Pietrangelo said. “You think about it, but you don’t really know what it’s like until it comes.”

The Blues beat the Boston Bruins in the seventh and deciding game of the NHL’s Stanley Cup Final on Wednesday night.

Blues Stanley Cup Parade Roars Through St. Louis As Rain Turns To Sunshine
Reporter Jeremy Goodwin covers celebrations after Game 7, including Phish's cover of the Blues' victory anthem "Gloria."
Fans cheer loudly as the Blues pass during the championship parade on Saturday, June 15, 2019.
Nick Schnelle | Special to St. Louis Public Radio

After waiting for more than five decades for the Blues to win the Stanley Cup, fans get rowdy at the victory parade. June 15, 2019
Nick Schnelle | Special to St. Louis Public Radio

Danny Tobben of Washington, Mo. celebrates after chugging beer from a "Stanley Cup" made from beer cans during the Blues championship parade. June 15, 2019
Nick Schnelle | Special to St. Louis Public Radio

Blues forward Jaden Schwartz waves the Blues flag during the Blues championship parade. June 15, 2019
Nick Schnelle | Special to St. Louis Public Radio
Blues rookie goaltender Jordan Binnington celebrates during the Blues championship parade in downtown. June 15, 2019
Nick Schnelle | Special to St. Louis Public Radio
Blues defenseman Colton Parayko sprays champagne in celebration during the Blues championship parade. June 15, 2019
Nick Schnelle | Special to St. Louis Public Radio

Blues Stanley Cup Parade Roars Through St. Louis As Rain Turns To Sunshine
Blues fans flock downtown for the Stanley Cup parade and tell reporter Jeremy Goodwin how it feels to be champions at last.
Blues fans cheer during the Blues championship parade in downtown St. Louis on Saturday. June 15, 2019
Nick Schnelle | Special to St. Louis Public Radio
Fans cheer as Blues players, including defenseman Robert Bortuzzo, pictured left, are carried by pickup trucks through the throng.
Nick Schnelle | Special to St. Louis Public Radio
Blues great Brett Hull celebrates with a smaller replica of the Stanley Cup.
Nick Schnelle | Special to St. Louis Public Radio

Blues defensemen Joel Edmundson carries the Stanley Cup at the end of the parade. June 15, 2019
Nick Schnelle | Special to St. Louis Public Radio
The Stanley Cup passes through the hands of fans toward the end of the Blues victory parade. June 15, 2019
Nick Schnelle | Special to St. Louis Public Radio

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