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Government, Politics & Issues

Recount Upholds Vote Approving 'Right To Farm' Amendment

Corn stalks Kaskaskia Island
File photo | Rachel Heidenry | 2010
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The results of a recount of the votes for the so-called 'right-to-farm' constitutional amendment show that it did pass, though by a slightly slimmer margin than originally announced.

The recount results, announced Monday by the secretary of state's office shows that Constitutional Amendment 1 passed by 2,375 votes out of almost a million votes cast.  The difference between "yes" and "no" votes before the recount was 2,490.

Don Nikodim chaired Missouri Farmers Care, a coalition of agriculture interest groups that campaigned and raised money for the right-to-farm amendment.  He called the recount's results "good news for anyone who eats."  He added, "Thanks to our supporters, agricultural organizations and farmers for their hard fought efforts in passing this constitutional amendment. Now Missouri farmers can move forward with providing a diverse food supply without the threat of out-of-state activist groups impeding our state's No. 1 industry."

In addition, Missouri Farm Bureau President Blake Hurst released the following statement:

"Missouri family farmers and consumers are the winners of the recount validating the passage of Constitutional Amendment No. 1, the farming rights amendment. Missouri farmers will have greater protection from unjustified and costly restrictions placed upon them by out-of-state, extreme organizations like the Humane Society of the United States. Consumers will continue to have a multitude of safe food choices that best fit their family's budget. Although the recount was unnecessary and costly to Missouri taxpayers, we are pleased with the results upholding the passage of Amendment No. 1."

Wes Shoemyer, president of Missouri's Food for America, which opposed Amendment 1, thanked supporters for their efforts.

"This was one of the closest ballot measures in Missouri's history, and we owed it to our supporters, our friends, and the citizens of this state to ensure that every vote was counted correctly and fairly. While it is not the outcome we had hoped for, we now stand stronger than ever with new alliances that are ready to take on big ag in a big way."

Follow Marshall Griffin on Twitter:  @MarshallGReport

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