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Government, Politics & Issues

17 Missouri residents have been charged in the Jan. 6, 2021, insurrection. Here are their names

 Louis Enrique Colon, of Blue Springs, as identified in the United States of America's criminal complaint against Colon and three other defendants for several charges related to their activities at the Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. Colon also is named as a defendant in a separate civil suit brought by the attorney general of the District of Columbia against the Proud Boys, Oathkeepers and multiple individuals, accusing them of "conspiring to terrorize the District" in connection with the Capitol insurrection.
United States District Court
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District of Columbia
Louis Enrique Colon, of Blue Springs, as identified in the United States of America's criminal complaint against Colon and three other defendants for several charges related to their activities at the Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. Colon also is named as a defendant in a separate civil suit brought by the attorney general of the District of Columbia against the Proud Boys, Oathkeepers and multiple individuals, accusing them of "conspiring to terrorize the District" in connection with the Capitol insurrection.

One year after the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the United States Capitol, 64% of Americans believe U.S. democracy is "in crisis and at risk of failing," according to an NPR/Ipsos poll.

Five people died during or after the insurrection, and approximately 140 members of law enforcement suffered injuries.

To date, more than 700 people have been charged with crimes. Based on court documents and media accounts, here are all of the people from Missouri facing charges and, in instances where they've pleaded guilty, the outcomes of their cases.

Colon, of Blue Springs, was arrested in Kansas City, Missouri, on Feb. 11, 2021. He was indicted along with Kansas residents Ryan Ashlock, William Chrestman and Christopher Kuehn, as well as Arizona siblings Felicia Konold and Cory Konold.

They were charged with conspiracy; civil disorder; obstruction of an official proceeding; knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority; and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds.

Colon also is named as a defendant in a separate civil suit brought by the attorney general of the District of Columbia against the Proud Boys, Oathkeepers and multiple individuals. The suit accuses the defendants of "conspiring to terrorize the District" in connection with the Capitol insurrection.

Joshua Dressel

Dressel, of Festus, was arrested in St. Louis on July 13, 2021.

He was charged with knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority; impeding or disrupting the orderly conduct of government business or official functions; or attempting or conspiring to do so.

Left: Joshua Dressel, as identified by the FBI from surveillance video inside the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. Zachary H. (Zac) Martin, as identified by an FBI agent in the United States of America's criminal complaint and arrest warrant.
U.S. Department of Justice
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Left: Joshua Dressel, as identified by the FBI from surveillance video inside the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. Zachary H. (Zac) Martin, as identified by an FBI agent in the United States of America's criminal complaint and arrest warrant.

Zachary H. Martin


Martin, of Springfield, was arrested in Springfield on Jan. 28, 2021.

He was charged with entering a restricted building or grounds; unlawful activities on Capitol grounds; disorderly conduct; and demonstrating in the Capitol building.

On Dec. 23, 2021, he pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor count of parading, demonstrating or picketing in the Capitol Building. He is scheduled to be sentenced on March 17, 2022.

Cara Maureen Hentschel


Hentschel, of Springfield, was arrested on Oct. 4, 2021.

She was charged with entering and remaining in a restricted building or grounds; disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building or grounds; disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds; and parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building.

Hentschel told a Facebook friend that she entered Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi's office and drank beer, but federal investigators have cast doubt on that claim, according to the Washington Post.

Mahailya Pryer


Pryer, of Springfield, was arrested on Oct. 4, 2021.

She was charged with entering and remaining in a restricted building or grounds; disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building or grounds; disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds; and parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building.

 Mahailya Pryer, left, and Cara Maureen Hentschel, outside the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021, as identified by an FBI agent from social media postings.
U.S. Attorney's Office
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District of Columbia
Mahailya Pryer, left, and Cara Maureen Hentschel, outside the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021, as identified by an FBI agent from social media postings.

Emily Hernandez


Hernandez, of Sullivan, was arrested in St. Louis on Jan. 19, 2021. She is the niece of another defendant, William D. Merry, Jr., and was charged along with him and defendant Paul S. Westover.

Hernandez faces charges of knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds; disorderly conduct which impeded the conduct of government business; stealing, selling, conveying or disposing of anything of value of the United States; disruptive conduct in the Capitol buildings; and parading, demonstrating, or picketing in the Capitol buildings.

William D. Merry, Jr.

William Merry, left, as identified by an FBI agent in the United States of America's criminal complaint. The agent also identifies the woman next to him, in the sunglasses, as his niece Emily Hernandez.
U.S. Attorney's Office / District of Columbia
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District of Columbia
William Merry, left, as identified by an FBI agent in the United States of America's criminal complaint. The agent also identifies the woman next to him, in the sunglasses, as his niece Emily Hernandez.

Merry, of St. Louis, was arrested in St. Louis on Feb. 4, 2021. He is the uncle of Emily Hernandez and was charged along with Hernandez and Paul Westover.

In a criminal complaint filed on Dec. 29, he was charged with embezzling, stealing, purloining, knowingly converting to his use and the use of another, and without authority, selling, conveying and disposing of any record, voucher, money and thing of value of the United States and any department and agency thereof, "that is, a shard of a sign previously designating Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s office suite within the U.S. Capitol, which has a value of less than $1000."

On Jan. 5, 2022, he pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor count of theft of government property. He is scheduled to be sentenced on March 21, 2022.

Nicholas L. Kennedy


Kennedy, of Sikeston, was arrested on July 28. In a superseding indictment filed on Oct. 29, he was charged with civil disorder; obstructing an official proceeding; entering and remaining in a restricted building or grounds; disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building or grounds; and parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building.

Matthew Loganbill

 U.S. Department of Justice
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U.S. Department of Justice

Loganbill, of Versailles, was arrested in Versailles on March 29, 2021.

He was charged with obstruction of a Congressional proceeding; unlawful entry; and violent entry or disorderly conduct.

Paul Westover


Westover, of Lake St. Louis, was arrested in St. Louis on Feb. 4, 2021, and was charged together with William D. Merry, Jr. and Merry's niece, Emily Hernandez.

Westover was charged with knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority; and engaging in disorderly or disruptive conduct on restricted grounds.

On Dec. 6, 2021, he pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor count of parading, demonstrating or picketing in the Capitol. His sentencing is scheduled for Feb. 16, 2022.

Stephen Brian Quick

 Stephen Brian Quick, right, in a photo taken on Jan. 6, 2021, and provided to the FBI by his brother, Michael Aaron Quick, right.
U.S. Department of Justice
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Stephen Brian Quick, right, in a photo taken on Jan. 6, 2021, and provided to the FBI by his brother, Michael Aaron Quick, right.

Stephen Brian Quick, of Springfield, was arrested along with his brother, Michael Aaron Quick, in Springfield on Feb. 12, 2021.

He was charged with committing unlawful activity on Capitol grounds and disorderly conduct.

On Dec. 23, 2021, he pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor count of parading, demonstrating or picketing in the Capitol Building.

Quick told investigators he was “ashamed” of what he had done by going inside the Capitol, according to an affidavit by an FBI special agent in support of the criminal complaint.

His sentencing is scheduled for March 17, 2022.

Michael Aaron Quick

Michael Aaron Quick, of Springfield, was arrested along with his brother, Stephen Brian Quick, in Springfield on Feb. 12, 2021.

He was charged with committing unlawful activity on Capitol grounds and disorderly conduct.

On Dec. 23, 2021, he pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor count of parading, demonstrating or picketing in the Capitol Building. His sentencing is scheduled for March 17, 2022.

Nicholas Burton Reimler

 Nicholas Burton Reimler inside the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021, as identified by an FBI agent in an arrest warrant.
U.S. Attorney's Office
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District of Columbia
Nicholas Burton Reimler inside the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021, as identified by an FBI agent in an arrest warrant.

Reimler, of Valley Park, was arrested in St. Louis on Feb. 18, 2021.

He was charged with violent entry or disorderly conduct and entering a restricted building or grounds.

On Sept. 17, Reimler pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor count of parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building. On Dec. 10, he was sentenced to three years' probation and ordered to make restitution of $500.

Carey Jon Walden

 Carey Jon Walden outside the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021, in a photograph Walden provided to the FBI.
U.S. Attorney's Office
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District of Columbia
Carey Jon Walden outside the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021, in a photograph Walden provided to the FBI.

Walden, of Kansas City, was arrested in Kansas City on May 28, 2021.

He was charged with knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds; disorderly or disruptive conduct at any place in the grounds or in any of the Capitol buildings; and parading, demonstrating or picketing in any of the Capitol buildings.

On Oct. 26, 2021, Walden pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor count of parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building. He is scheduled to be sentenced on Jan. 19, 2022.

Kelsey Leigh Ann Wilson

 U.S. Department of Justice
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U.S. Department of Justice

Kelsey Leigh Ann Wilson, of Springfield, was arrested in Springfield on August 18, 2021.

She was charged with disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building or grounds; disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds; and parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building.

On Sept. 27, 2021, Wilson and her husband, Zachary John Wilson, pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor count of parading, demonstrating, or picketing in a Capitol building. She is scheduled to be sentenced on Jan. 27, 2022.

Zachary John Wilson

Zachary John Wilson was arrested in Springfield on Feb. 19, 2021.

He was charged with entering a restricted building or grounds.

On Sept. 27, 2021, Wilson and his wife, Kelsey Leigh Ann Wilson, pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor count of parading, demonstrating, or picketing in a Capitol building. He is scheduled to be sentenced on Jan. 27, 2022.

Isaac Samuel Yoder

 The government's charging documents include a photo published on the Newsweek website, from which FBI agents identified Isaac Samuel Yoder.
U.S. Attorney's Office / Newsweek
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Newsweek
The government's charging documents include a photo published on the Newsweek website, from which FBI agents identified Isaac Samuel Yoder.

Yoder, of Nevada, was arrested in Springfield on Aug. 4, 2021.

He was charged with entering a restricted building or grounds; disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building; disorderly conduct; parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building.

Multiple photographs showed Yoder at the U.S. Capitol dressed as George Washington, according to Newsweek.

Were you at the Jan. 6, 2021, insurrection and open to talking with KCUR about it? Contact us at dan@kcur.org.

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