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Health, Science, Environment

MSD Constructs 3-Mile Sewer To Address Overflows In Ladue

Part of the $4.7 million sewer system upgrade involves removing illegal sewer bypasses, like the one pictured here.
Ted Heisel | Missouri Coalition for the Environment
The Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District is building a sewer line and plans to eliminate seven sewage discharge sites in St. Louis County.

The Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District is building a three-mile sewer line underneath the city of Ladue to address overflow problems in the area.

The $62.5 million project, which began in September, is being constructed along Deer Creek in St. Louis County. The work will help the utility comply with a $4.7 billion consent decree from a 2012 Clean Water Act lawsuit

Workers are building a 2.6-mile trunk sewer to help prevent sewer overflows when it rains, said Rebecca Losli, a program manager for MSD. 

“Sewer surcharging can lead to basement backups, and it can also lead to overflows to the environment,” Losli said. “That diluted sanitary flow is a source of pollution to our creeks.” 

The planned sewer line extends from an area near Ladue Horton Watkins High School to where Overbrook Drive crosses over Two Mile Creek. MSD plans to eliminate seven sewage outflow sites. 

A map of a sewer line the Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District began building in Ladue in September 2019.
Credit Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District
The Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District began last month to build a 3.2-mile sewer line in Ladue.

The project is funded by a $38.6 million loan from the Environmental Protection Agency and a $24 million loan from the Missouri Department of Natural Resources. 

“Water and wastewater systems are essential infrastructure that support the health and economic vitality of a community,” Missouri DNR Director Carol Comer said in a press release.

The work is expected to be completed by spring 2024. The sewer line will be connected to the four-mile Deer Creek Sanitary Tunnel that the utility began building last year. 

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