Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

Jason Rosenbaum

Political Correspondent

Since entering the world of professional journalism in 2006, Jason Rosenbaum dove head first into the world of politics, policy and even rock and roll music. A graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism, Rosenbaum spent more than four years in the Missouri State Capitol writing for the Columbia Daily Tribune, Missouri Lawyers Media and the St. Louis Beacon. Since moving to St. Louis in 2010, Rosenbaum's work appeared in Missouri Lawyers Media, the St. Louis Business Journal and the Riverfront Times' music section. He also served on staff at the St. Louis Beacon as a politics reporter. Rosenbaum lives in Richmond Heights with with his wife Lauren and their two sons.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, April 24, 2009 - Republicans in the Missouri House threw a monkey wrench into the budgetary process with a proposal to use Missouri's share of federal stimulus money to cut the state income tax by $1 billion.

But with three weeks remaining in the session, both Democrats and Republicans are skeptical that a tax cut can pass. 

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, April 22, 2009 - At a press conference Thursday morning, AmerenUE announced that it would no longer seek to build a second nuclear plant. That news came following a consensus in Jefferson City that the CWIP bill would not pass this session.

AmerenUE had spent $75 million on licensing fees and other preparatory work. Those costs will not be passed on to the ratepayers, the company said. 

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, April 20, 2009 - Republicans in the Missouri General Assembly saw themselves as a bulwark against Gov. Jay Nixon when the session began. But with roughly a month to go before lawmakers adjourn for the year, Republicans seem to be turning their aim away from the Democratic governor and instead targeting each other.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, March 31, 2009 - As Metro's cuts go into effect, lawmakers in the Missouri General Assembly are weighing starkly different responses.

State Rep. Rachel Storch, D-St. Louis, argues the state needs to take immediate action; she proposes an emergency spending bill to ease a nearly $45 million deficit.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, March 18, 2009 - In 2000, Republican Jim Talent almost won his bid for Missouri governor with a highly effective TV ad campaign asserting that Democrats, who then controlled the Legislature, had failed to fulfill the state's promise to use the income from the state's gambling casinos to increase spending for education.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, March 5, 2009 - The Missouri Legislature is considering bills to change the way hospitals report serious medical errors.

The bills deal with so-called "never events," which are mishaps considered unacceptable at health-care facilities. They include having a foreign object left inside a patient during surgery or surgery performed on the wrong body part or receiving care from somebody impersonating a health care professional.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Feb. 20, 2009 - Gov. Jay Nixon says that billions of dollars in federal stimulus money is a pathway toward transforming Missouri's economy and infrastructure.

But to state Sen. Scott Rupp, R-Wentzville, the stimulus money is more like a wild party that will eventually end -- with the cleanup having monumental consequences for future budgets.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Feb. 11, 2009 - A St. Louis-based anti-abortion group is trying to put a ban on state funding for embryonic stem cell research into the Missouri Constitution, a shift in strategy after efforts to ban specific stem cell research procedures failed.

In 2006, Missouri voters narrowly approved a constitutional amendment barring the Missouri General Assembly from interfering with any stem cell research allowed by federal law. The measure, commonly known as Amendment 2, protects a practice called somatic cell nuclear transfer.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Feb. 1, 2009 - Both opponents and foes of abortion rights in Missouri are pressing forward with their agendas in the midst of a guard change in the governor's mansion.

But election of Gov. Jay Nixon, a Democrat, and solid Republican majorities in the Legislature have left both sides of the debate unsure about whether any more abortion restrictions will be enacted over the next few years.

Pages