Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

Jason Rosenbaum

Political Correspondent

Since entering the world of professional journalism in 2006, Jason Rosenbaum dove head first into the world of politics, policy and even rock and roll music. A graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism, Rosenbaum spent more than four years in the Missouri State Capitol writing for the Columbia Daily Tribune, Missouri Lawyers Media and the St. Louis Beacon. Since moving to St. Louis in 2010, Rosenbaum's work appeared in Missouri Lawyers Media, the St. Louis Business Journal and the Riverfront Times' music section. He also served on staff at the St. Louis Beacon as a politics reporter. Rosenbaum lives in Richmond Heights with with his wife Lauren and their two sons.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Aug. 29, 2011 - A firm that distributes some of the larger free publications in the St. Louis area -- as well as the Post-Dispatch and the Suburban Journals -- wants retailers to sign on to a plan that other publishers say could shut them out of their traditional locations.

St. Louis is home to scores of free publications placed near retailers' entrances or in news bins on street corners. And wide availability of these periodicals is often critical to attracting readership and capturing advertising dollars.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, July 25, 2011 - Homeland Security efforts are often associated with professional firefighters and police — those trained to be first responders. But a program available across Missouri offers training for ordinary citizens to react affirmatively to emergency situations.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: When the Department of Homeland Security released a list in May of cities that qualified for the Urban Area Security Initiative program, Kansas City didn't make the cut -- even though it's been receiving funds since 2003.

This year, St. Louis was the only city in Missouri to receive part of the $662.6 million allocated toward preventing or responding to terrorism, and it will likely receive a smaller slice -- about $5.97 million -- than in the 2010 budget year.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, July 7, 2011 - When the Department of Homeland Security released a list in May of cities that qualified for the Urban Area Security Initiative program, Kansas City didn't make the cut -- even though it's been receiving funds since 2003.

This year, St. Louis was the only city in Missouri to receive part of the $662.6 million allocated toward preventing or responding to terrorism, and it will likely receive a smaller slice -- about $5.97 million -- than in the 2010 budget year.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: For Mike Eads, a federal grant program to help local fire departments forestall layoffs provided some extra firepower in a crisis situation.

Eads is the fire chief at the Neosho Fire Department in southwest Missouri. In February, it received $780,643 from a Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency Response grant. SAFER is one of many grant programs under the Federal Emergency Management Agency's grant programs directorate -- part of the Department of Homeland Security -- that provides funds to local agencies.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, May 14, 2011 - JEFFERSON CITY - Compromise was the buzzword of this year's legislative session. Missouri lawmakers always talked about it, and occasionally reached it. But much of the time, they did not.

That was particularly true of the top issues that died during the final hours: tax credits for development of Lambert airport, local control of St. Louis police, funding for nuclear power construction and new rules for initiative petitions.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, May 14, 2011 -As the Missouri legislative session wound to an end, pending bills faced a last-minute reprieve or final death. Here's a partial list of some of the major issues that the General Assembly acted on, or deferred.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, May 13, 2011 - The Missouri House overwhelmingly passed two identical bills to impose further state restrictions on abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy.

The chamber voted 121-33 on Thursday morning, and 117-30 at night, to send the bills to Gov. Jay Nixon. Both tallies were far more than needed to override a potential veto.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, May 13, 2011 - With about 40 minutes to go before the 6 p.m. deadline, the Missouri House passed an economic development bill that included about $360 million in tax credits for the long-sought China hub and dozens of changes in other state tax credit programs.

But it was too late. The state Senate declined to take up the bill in the minutes remaining, meaning that the proposed economic development bill -- and the city of St. Louis' long-sought local control of its police department -- died. Senate President Pro tem Rob Mayer, R-Dexter, said he was proud of the Senate's effort to pass its own economic development plan approved earlier, even though that had been rejected by the house.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, May 12, 2011 - The Missouri Senate finally approved the nomination of Thomas Irwin on Wednesday to the St. Louis Board of Police Commissioners. But his successful appointment could be moot if legislation abolishing the board becomes law.

Gov. Jay Nixon nominated Irwin to fill a term on the five-person board; the governor appoints four of the members. Irwin is to serve until Jan. 31, 2015.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, May 09, 2011 - St. Louis lawyer Ed Martin announced this morning that he's dropping his U.S. Senate bid and running instead for the 2nd District congressional district -- a move that's not unexpected.

At a press conference at McArthur's Bakery in south St. Louis County, Martin said that the ideological similarities between himself and the 2nd District's current congressman -- U.S. Rep. Todd Akin, R-Town and Country -- are among the reasons why he decided to change electoral contests. Akin is expected to announce a bid for the U.S. Senate later this month.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, May 9, 2011 - With the Missouri General Assembly finished with this session's two mandatory tasks -- the state budget and congressional redistricting -- legislators are heading into the final week with the future of a lot of legislation hanging in the balance.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, May 6, 2011 - A day before the legal deadline, the Missouri General Assembly adjourned for a long weekend after passing on Thursday a $23.2 billion budget for the state government's fiscal year that begins July 1.

Despite the influx of $500 million-plus in federal stimulus money, the new budget features a number of notable reductions from the current fiscal year -- including a $45,000-a-year salary for the executive chef at the Governor's Mansion

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, May 4, 2011 - The Missouri Senate voted 28-6 this afternoon to override Gov. Jay Nixon's veto of the bill crafting new boundaries for the state's eight remaining congressional districts. That vote, which was not a surprise, followed the state House's narrow override by 109-44.

The map does away with the district of U.S. Rep. Russ Carnahan, D-St. Louis.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, May 4, 2011 - At 10 p.m. Tuesday, state Sen. Brian Nieves, R-Washington, was discussing gun rights and the differences between bibliographies and footnotes. And whether to use his "NPR voice."

Earlier, state Sen. Jim Lembke, R-Lemay, spent part of his self-proclaimed "shift" reading from the bible.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, May 2, 2011 - St. Louis area political and civic leaders, Republican and Democrat, are ecstatic that the Missouri General Assembly appears on the verge of approving $360 million in state tax credits to help Lambert St. Louis International Airport become a cargo hub for goods coming from and going to the People's Republic of China.

Monday, the state Senate voted 32-2 in favor of the measure. It now goes to the state House.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, April 28, 2011 -The Missouri House and Senate swiftly voted late Wednesday to approve a compromise map for the state's eight remaining congressional districts. The votes came soon after negotiators broke a stalemate that had heightened tensions within GOP ranks.

The map passed the House by a vote of 96-55, and then cleared the Missouri Senate, 27-7. The House margin is 13 votes short the number needed to override a potential veto from Gov. Jay Nixon, a Democrat.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, April 28, 2011 - Following a whirlwind mix of legislative and executive action, Gov. Jay Nixon signed into law significant alterations to a ballot initiative strengthening regulations on dog breeding.

The compromise keeps intact some of Prop B's provisions, but it eliminates limits on how many dogs a breeder can keep and how often they can be bred. It also provides time for breeders to comply with space and exercise requirements and provides guidelines for veterinarian care.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, April 27, 2011 - U.S. Rep. Russ Carnahan, D-St. Louis, stopped by Crystal City on Tuesday to view a weakened section of the community's Mississippi River levee and to hear the Army Corps of Engineers' plan for shoring it up.

Carnahan's visit also was a reminder of his own efforts to shore up his political career, now under threat from the Missouri General Assembly.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, April 21, 2011 - Just two days after offering a compromise aimed at bridging opposing sides, Gov. Jay Nixon, a Democrat, was once again on the hot seat about Proposition B, a ballot measure narrowly approved by Missouri voters last fall to regulate dog breeding operations -- and once again declined to state where he stands.

After the GOP-dominated legislature sent Nixon a bill to weaken numerous provisions of the initiative, the governor attempted to re-frame the issue Monday by offering an alternative that received support from some animal welfare groups, agriculture organizations and Republican legislators.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, April 20, 2011 - A bill to allow Ameren Missouri and a consortium of energy companies to recoup the costs of a site permit for a possible nuclear power plant appears dead for this year, according to a St. Louis senator who handled the bill.

The legislation would have authorized utility customers to pay roughly $45 million for an early site permit, which proponents say could pave the way for a new nuclear reactor in Callaway County. Legislative action is needed because of a law approved by voters in 1976, which restricts utility companies from passing along on construction costs to consumers. It's commonly known as CWIP.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, April 19, 2011 - For both sides in the battle over Proposition B, the clock is now ticking.

On Monday, many agricultural and animal-welfare groups announced that they had reached an agreement that "will strengthen requirements for the care and treatment of dogs and protect Missouri agriculture."

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, April 13, 2011 - The Missouri House narrowly approved legislation Wednesday weakening various provisions of a voter-approved law regulating dog breeding, sending the contentious issue to Gov. Jay Nixon's desk. 

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, April 7, 2011 - The Missouri House voted overwhelmingly today to approve a map that lays out boundaries for the state's remaining eight congressional districts. As expected, the map does away with the district now represented by U.S. Rep. Russ Carnahan, D-St. Louis.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, April 7, 2011 - A group of Missouri state senators agreed today to drop their filibuster of a bill that authorizes the state to accept and distribute $105 million in federal stimulus money earmarked for the extension of unemployment benefits.

But in exchange, Senate Republican leaders agreed to seek $250 million in cuts in other federal stimulus spending.

This articla first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, April 7, 2011 - State House Speaker Steve Tilley, R-Perryville, said Thursday that Gov. Jay Nixon's proposal to add $1.1 million to enforce the state's existing dog-breeding regulations won't deter a legislative push to revamp or repeal Proposition B, which imposes further restrictions.

Tilley said he hadn't seen Nixon's proposal but did not think it would change the trajectory of the bill regarding Proposition B, which was narrowly approved by voters last fall.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, April 1, 2011 - For Missouri state Sen. Eric Schmitt, not much differentiated Chicago from St. Louis in the 19th century. That is, he said, except for one big idea -- Chicago's willingness to adapt to transportation changes.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, March 31, 2011 - U.S. Reps. Russ Carnahan and William Lacy Clay, both St. Louis Democrats, have jointly condemned a congressional redistricting proposal that is expected to be approved by a Missouri House committee next week.

The two said in a statement the map -- which, in effect, does away with Carnahan's district and dramatically changes Clay's -- "emphasizes partisanship over fairness."

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, March 17, 2011 - The outcome of legislation weakening voter-approved regulations on dog breeding could come down to how members of the Missouri House define "the will of the people."

If lawmakers gravitate toward the local definition of democracy put forth by state Rep. Ed Schieffer, then House members could send state Sen. Mike Parson's legislation to Gov. Jay Nixon. Proposition B measure failed overwhelmingly in the Troy Democrat's district, prompting the three-term lawmaker to support Parson's measure.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, March 14, 2011 - Some policymakers and observers involved in a push to build a new nuclear reactor in Callaway County say the crisis at a Japanese nuclear reactor won't have much impact on legislative action in the Show Me State.

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