'Feeding Cahokia' Outlines New Findings About Agriculture, Women And Life In Ancient Civilization | St. Louis Public Radio

'Feeding Cahokia' Outlines New Findings About Agriculture, Women And Life In Ancient Civilization

Apr 24, 2019

Wash U's Gayle Fritz is the author of "Feeding Cahokia: Early Agriculture in the North American Heartland."
Credit Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Cahokia Mounds – the peaceful, sprawling historic site that sits just outside Collinsville, Illinois – was once home to thousands of people. Contemporary understandings of what life was like within the thriving ancient civilization continue to evolve and expand, and Washington University paleoethnobiologist Gayle Fritz’s new research is part of that.

Her new book “Feeding Cahokia: Early Agriculture in the North American Heartland” presents fresh findings about Cahokian agriculture – and about the role and status of the women who took the lead in this aspect of daily life.

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, the professor emerita of anthropology joined St. Louis Public Radio’s Jonathan Ahl to talk about it.

Listen to the conversation:

St. Louis on the Air” brings you the stories of St. Louis and the people who live, work and create in our region. “St. Louis on the Air” producers Alex Heuer, Evie Hemphill, Lara Hamdan and Jon Lewis give you the information you need to make informed decisions and stay in touch with our diverse and vibrant St. Louis region.

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