Politically Speaking: Sen. Lincoln Hough Looks Ahead To The 2020 Missouri Legislative Session | St. Louis Public Radio

Politically Speaking: Sen. Lincoln Hough Looks Ahead To The 2020 Missouri Legislative Session

Sep 10, 2019

Sen. Lincoln Hough is the latest guest on the Politically Speaking podcast. The Springfield Republican talked with St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Jaclyn Driscoll about the upcoming special session — and what to expect when lawmakers come back to Jefferson City in January.

Hough represents Missouri’s 30th Senatorial District, which takes in a big chunk of Springfield and Greene County. He was sworn into office in early January for a four-year term.

Here’s what Hough talked about during the show:

  • He discussed his decision to come back to the Missouri General Assembly after spending a couple of years on the Greene County Commission. 
  • Hough talked about his role as vice chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee, which is responsible for helping craft the state budget. 
  • During the 2019 session, Hough ended up handling an economic development and workforce development package that survived a marathon filibuster. He talked about expectations on those two issues during the 2020 session.
  • Hough gave his take on a potential ballot initiative that would expand Medicaid. Proponents, including some of the state’s biggest hospitals, have poured in big money to get that proposal on the 2020 ballot.

Hough is a cattle rancher who was first elected to the Missouri House in 2012. He served for two terms before successfully seeking a seat on the Greene County Commission in 2016. 

His tenure in county government was particularly eventful, as he called for a state audit to look into allegations that taxpayer dollars were used to push for a Greene County sales tax hike. That put him at odds with Presiding Commissioner Bob Cirtin, a fellow Republican.

Hough decided to run for the Missouri Senate last year, taking on former state Rep. Charlie Norr, D-Springfield. While Springfield is a historic Republican stronghold, it’s become more favorable to Democrats in recent years. Ultimately, Hough defeated Norr by about 4,000 votes in a highly competitive contest.

The podcast is sponsored by the St. Louis-based law firm of Capes Sokol

Follow Jason Rosenbaum on Twitter: @jrosenbaum

Follow Jaclyn Driscoll on Twitter: @DriscollNPR

Follow Lincoln Hough on Twitter: @LincolnHough

Music: "Dinner Bells" by Wolf Parade