Where Did The Moon's Water Come From? Wash U Researchers Search For Answers | St. Louis Public Radio

Where Did The Moon's Water Come From? Wash U Researchers Search For Answers

Dec 4, 2019

The Earth’s moon contains ice, but scientists don’t know much about where the water came from. As the moon formed, water could have come from Earth’s volcanoes in the form of gas. It could have been brought there by comets and meteorites. Or, it may have traveled to the lunar surface via solar wind that interacted with minerals on the moon to create water. 

Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis are teaming up to find some answers. The team has been chosen as one of NASA’s eight new Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institutes. They are part of a five-year cooperative agreement valued at more than $7 million.

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, Sarah Fenske talked with Jeff Gillis-Davis, an associate research faculty in the physics department at Wash U, about how they will study the moon’s water and how lunar water may be utilized in future space expeditions.

Listen to their conversation:

St. Louis on the Air” brings you the stories of St. Louis and the people who live, work and create in our region. The show is hosted by Sarah Fenske and produced by Alex Heuer, Emily Woodbury, Evie Hemphill, Lara Hamdan and Tonina Saputo. The engineer is Aaron Doerr, and production assistance is provided by Charlie McDonald.

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