St. Louis on the Air | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis on the Air

Noon-1 p.m. and 10-11 p.m. (repeat) Monday-Friday
  • Local Host Don Marsh

St. Louis on the Air creates a unique space where guests and listeners can share ideas and opinions with respect and honesty. Whether exploring issues and challenges confronting our region, discussing the latest innovations in science and technology, taking a closer look at our history or talking with authors, artists and musicians, St. Louis on the Air brings you the stories of St. Louis and the people who live, work and create in our region.

St. Louis on the Air brings you the stories of St. Louis and the people who live, work and create in our region. St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh and producers Alex HeuerEvie Hemphill and Lara Hamdan give you the information you need to make informed decisions and stay in touch with our diverse and vibrant St. Louis region.

St. Louis on the Air is sponsored by University College at Washington University

Brain sculpture in Bloomington, Ind.
(via Flickr / Ali Eminov)

While it may be well established that our brains command our actions, it’s becoming increasingly clear that we can have greater control over the message.

Increasingly, research shows people can take steps to protect the health of their brain and as one aspect of that, may be able to sidetrack compulsive behaviors such as eating disorders.

The Missouri Eating Disorders Association is one agency which provides education, resources and advocacy to bring understanding and support to those treating or affected by the disease.

(via Flickr/mike matney)

A group called Missourians for Equality is interested in gathering petition signatures for a ballot measure which would make it illegal to discriminate on the basis of sexual orientation.

Plus, St. Louis firefighters won a big decision in the Missouri Supreme Court.  The ruling allows them to live outside city limits if they’ve been with the department for at least seven years.

Those are just a couple of the topics for our monthly legal roundtable.  Host Don Marsh talked with a panel of legal experts including:

(Courtesy: The Grannie Annie)

Public radio listeners are familiar with weekly Friday segments from StoryCorps in which family members and close friends talk with one another, sharing memorable stories.

And as we head into the holiday season and families begin to gather, we’re reminded of opportunities to take full advantage of documenting and preserving family histories and stories.

(via Flickr/SodanieChea)

Within approximately the last twenty years, Missouri ranks among the worst states in which the gap between rich and middle-income households has widened.  That’s according to a new report by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities and the Economic Policy Institute.

As we approach the Thanksgiving holiday, we also take note of the report’s finding in which the gap between the very richest and the poor is even larger with the top 5 percent of Missouri households having an average income 11.7 times that of the bottom fifth.

Evan C. Parker / Via Flickr

The lame duck Congress is now in session and while historically known as a time of inaction, the large task of avoiding the “fiscal cliff” is ever-present.

The fiscal cliff is a combination of tax increases and spending cuts which would take effect on January 1, 2013, primarily due to the expiration of the Bush-era tax cuts.

Host Don Marsh talked with Rob Koenig, the St. Louis Beacon’s Washington D.C. correspondent.

(Judy Schmidt, James Gathany / CDC)

On November 6, 2012, Missouri voters overwhelmingly approved Proposition E, which prohibited the Governor or any state agency from establishing or operating a state-based health insurance exchange without legislative or citizen approval.

The Affordable Care Act, however, moves on toward full implementation in 2014.

Host Don Marsh talked with Sidney Watson, Professor of Law at Saint Louis University’s Health Law Policy Center, and Ryan Barker, Director of Health Policy for the Missouri Foundation for Health.

Don Crinklaw

Many St. Louisans remember Elaine Viets from her time as a columnist for the St. Louis Post Dispatch.

In the 15 years since she left the city, she has become a prolific and New York Times best-selling author of mystery novels.

One of Viets’ series features St. Louis mystery shopper Josie Marcus.  The series debuted in October 2005 with “Dying in Style.”  “Murder Is a Piece of Cake" is her eighth adventure.

Host Don Marsh talked with Viets about her new book and experiences in St. Louis.

Related Events

(UPI/Rick Meyer)

The EF-5 tornado in Joplin, Missouri in May 2011 killed 161 people and a left city and its residents devastated.

Two filmmakers - Beth Pike and Erica Tremblay - have created films documenting the disaster, the fallout, and what they call a “remarkable recovery.”

Timothy Greenfield-Sanders

Thelma Golden is the Director and Chief Curator of The Studio Museum in Harlem.

Through art, Golden says, people can have a dialogue about race and culture.

This year, Golden is part of the Contemporary Art Museum’s Susan Sherman Annual Distinguished Speaker Series.

Host Don Marsh and St. Louis Public Radio fellowship producer Erin Williams talk with Thelma Golden about her career and work.

Related Event

The Bridgeman Art Library

The Mona Lisa and The Last Supper are two of the most well-known and recognizable paintings.

The Italian artist, Leonardo da Vinci, was not famous when he began painting The Last Supper in 1495 and he faced much professional uncertainty.  He was forty years old and had left several patrons dissatisfied with his work.

However, The Last Supper, a fifteen feet high by thirty feet wide work, is considered a masterpiece.  It depicts the last supper of Jesus with his disciples and the reaction to him saying he would be betrayed.

Jason Epperson

Jean King and Richard Baron first met in 1968, when the two joined forces to protest conditions and rent hikes in St. Louis public housing.

Together, they earned a reputation as “imaginative leaders” and community advocates, attracting the attention of author/filmmaker Daniel Blake Smith.

Robert Peterson / St. Louis Public Radio

The transition from active military service to civilian life can challenge veterans and put a strain on a city’s homelessness resources.

Ariana Tobin / St. Louis Public Radio

One of the most dramatic military stories of this young century is about the Navy Seal raid that killed Osama bin Laden, in May 2011.

Host Don Marsh talks with St. Louis native and journalist Mark Bowden, the author of the new book, “The Finish: The Killing of Osama Bin Laden.”

Bowden is best known for his 1999 best-selling book, “Black Hawk Down: A Story of Modern War,” which was later made into a film of the same title, directed by Ridley Scott.

Bowden’s new book about the raid of bin Laden’s compound is drawing praise.

(via Flickr/Martijn.Munneke)

Host Don Marsh talks with pianist and author Caroline Stoessinger.

Stoessinger is author of "A Century of Wisdom: Lessons from the Life of Alice Herz-Sommer, the World's Oldest Living Holocaust Survivor."

She is participating in the 34th Annual Jewish Book Festival.

Related Event

34th Annual Jewish Book Festival
November 4 – 15, 2012
Various Times
Jewish Community Center, 2 Millstone Campus Drive

(via Flickr/League of Women Voters of California)

Women are not a homogenous voting bloc in elections though their influence as a group plays a big role.

President Barack Obama carried 55 percent of the demographic on his way to re-election.

Host Don Marsh talks with two political experts about the role women played in the 2012 election cycle, both as voters and as candidates.

Marsh is joined by Dayna Stock, Manager of the Sue Shear Institute for Women in Public Life at the University of Missouri – St. Louis, and Gwyneth Williams, professor of political science at Webster University.

Robert Peterson / St. Louis Public Radio

The election is over and despite some predictions that the results would take a considerable amount of time to trickle in and may even be unknown for a few days, that was not the case.

Democratic U.S. Senator Claire McCaskill handedly won re-election, defeating Republican Congressman Todd Akin.

(via Flickr/Michael Velardo)

The number of heroin deaths in St. Louis County has decreased in recent months when compared to recent years, however, use of and addiction to the drug in the St. Louis area has grown to epidemic proportions.

voxefxtm | Flickr

It’s Election Day and while we won’t know the results until this evening, we take the beginning of our program to check in with reporters at several polling locations to see how the voting process is moving along.

Host Don Marsh talks with St. Louis Public Radio’s Julie Bierach and Tri States Public Radio’s Jason Parrott about voting in St. Louis, Missouri and Quincy, Illinois.

Adam Allington/St. Louis Public Radio

The race for U.S. Senate in Missouri between Democratic incumbent Senator Claire McCaskill and Republican Congressman Todd Akin is close and has garnered national attention.

Recent polling data shows Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney leads in Missouri, as does McCaskill over Akin, by a slim margin.

peter.a_photography | Flickr

The Drug Policy Alliance bills itself as the “nation’s leading organization promoting alternatives to current drug policy that are grounded in science, compassion, health and human rights.”

The organization believes the war on drugs is doing more harm than good and among other things, the DPA supports the use of marijuana for medicinal purposes.

Host Don Marsh talks with Ethan Nadelmann, the founder and Executive Director of the Drug Policy Alliance

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