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Abortion

Quinn: Cardinal George, bishops 'made a mistake'

Nov 7, 2011
(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Pat Quinn says he thinks Cardinal Francis George and other Catholic leaders "made a mistake" criticizing the governor for agreeing to present an award at a ceremony hosted by an abortion-rights organization.

Quinn on Monday said he wishes George would have contacted him before issuing a statement saying the governor was rewarding those who support "the legal right to kill children in their mothers' wombs." Quinn is to present rape victim Jennie Goodman with an award at a luncheon hosted by Personal PAC, which aims to elect pro-choice candidates.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Nov. 5, 2011 - Judy Widdicombe, an obstetrical nurse who helped guide women to safe abortions before the procedure was legal and who opened the first abortion clinic in Missouri after Roe v. Wade made it the law of the land, died Thursday, (Nov. 3) at Gambrill Gardens Retirement Community. She was 73.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

Most of the new laws passed by the Missouri General Assembly this year officially took effect over the weekend, on August 28.

They include the controversial ban on late-term abortions that Governor Jay Nixon (D) allowed to become law without his signature.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, July 14, 2011 - As abortion opponents had predicted, Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has decided to allow two identical bills restricting abortion to become law without his signature. Under the state constitution, today was the last day for the governor to make a decision on the bills.

Both bills make it a felony to perform an abortion in Missouri past 20 weeks of pregnancy, unless two physicians verify that the fetus isn't viable, or the woman faces death or permanent damage to a major bodily function.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Updated 2:05 p.m. with comment from Nixon.

Updated 4:19 p.m. with comment from Planned Parenthood and Rep. Tim Jones.

Mo. Gov. Jay Nixon says he will let a controversial measure that puts further restrictions on abortions performed after 20 weeks become law without his signature.

The state already bans late-term abortions unless the life or health of the mother is in danger. That includes mental health.

Morning headlines: Thursday, July 14, 2011

Jul 14, 2011
flickr/MoNewsHorizon

Tilley officially launches campaign

Missouri House Speaker Steven Tilley has formally launched his campaign for lieutenant governor. Tilley says he is starting off with more than $1 million in his campaign account.

Tilley, a Republican from Perryville, officially announced his candidacy Thursday for Missouri's second-ranking executive post. It comes as no surprise, because Tilley had changed his fundraising committee to reflect his bid for lieutenant governor last December.

Morning headlines: Friday, May 13, 2011

May 13, 2011
slprnews

So-called "Late-Term" Abortion Ban Goes to Governor Nixon

The bill passed Thursday by the Missouri House would ban abortions after 20 weeks unless two doctors verify that a fetus is not viable, or that it constitutes a medical threat to the mother.  The bill's supporters call abortions performed on viable fetuses barbaric. 

Democrat Tishaura Jones of St. Louis opposed the bill, saying she's pro-life for herself but pro-choice for everyone else:

Mo. lawmakers pass limits on late-term abortions

May 12, 2011
(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

Note: descriptions of abortion procedures contained in this post may be disturbing to some.

Legislation that would ban so-called “late-term” abortions in Missouri is on its way to Governor Jay Nixon.

The bill passed today by the Missouri House would ban abortions after 20 weeks unless two doctors verify that a fetus is not viable, or that it constitutes a medical threat to the mother.  The bill was passed by the Missouri Senate last month.

Mo. Senate passes late-term abortion bill

Apr 7, 2011
(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

The Missouri Senate has passed legislation imposing more restrictions on late-term abortions.

The legislation would remove a general exception for a woman's health from a current state law banning abortions of viable fetuses. Instead, the legislation would allow such abortions only when the woman's life is endangered or when pregnancy risks permanent damage to a major bodily function.

Morning headlines: Thursday, March 31, 2011

Mar 31, 2011

Opening Day in St. Louis  is Here

Albert Pujols is about to begin what could be his final season with the St. Louis Cardinals. The team expects a rousing welcome for the three-time NL MVP, even though Pujols is playing hardball off the field. Year 11 for Pujols, all with the Cardinals, begins today at Busch Stadium against the San Diego Padres. Game time is 3:15 p.m.

House Redistricting Map Would Eliminate Third District

Morning headlines: Wednesday, March 30, 2011

Mar 30, 2011
(Flickr/Cast a Line)

East St. Louis School District Sends Layoff Notices to 237 Teachers

In an effort to save $9 million, the East St. Louis Board voted Tuesday to notify 287 teachers that they might not be hired back next year. That’s according to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. The district serves about 7,300 students and has 562 full-time teachers.

The district is also proposing to close three schools.

Marshall Griffin, St. Louis Public Radio

The Missouri House has passed legislation to ban so-called “late term” abortions in the Show-Me State.

The bill would ban abortions after 20 weeks unless two doctors verify that a fetus is either not viable or is a medical threat to the mother.

Morning headlines: Tuesday, March 15, 2011

Mar 15, 2011

  • According to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay announced late last night that the city will lay off 30 firefighters. Chief of Staff Jeff Rainford says the city will cut 24 more positions through attrition, bringing the cuts to nearly 10 percent of the departments 600 firefighters. Fire Chief Dennis Jenkerson says the layoffs will not impact public safety.

Marshall Griffin, St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri House committee has passed a bill that would bar abortions of fetuses deemed capable of living outside the womb.

The bill would ban abortions after 20 weeks unless two doctors verify that a fetus is either not viable or is a medical threat to the mother.

Marshall Griffin, St. Louis Public Radio

A Missouri House committee heard testimony today on a bill that would make it illegal to abort a fetus deemed capable of living outside the womb.

The bill would ban abortions after 20 weeks unless two doctors verify that a fetus is either not viable or constitutes a medical threat to the mother.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: August 21, 2008 - The Department of Health and Human Services said Thursday that it would put new rules in place in 30 days to take away funding from more than 584,000 hospitals, clinics, health plans, doctors' offices and providers if they refuse to accommodate workers personal, moral or religious objections.

"People should not be forced to say or do things they believe are morally wrong," Health and Human Services Secretary Mike Leavitt said. "Health-care workers should not be forced to provide services that violate their violates their own conscience."

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: August 6, 2008 - Last night's primary election saw the opening moves of a new battle taking place among the Republican Party's pro-life constituency.

The scuffle is brewing between Missouri Right to Life (MRL), the long-established standard bearer of the pro-life political community and Missourians United for Life (MUL), a new upstart group with the implicit backing of the Republican Party leadership.

9th district profiles: Onder and Luetkemeyer

Jul 15, 2008

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: July 15, 2008 - The news wasn’t good for Rep. Bob Onder, R-Lake Saint Louis, on the day of his second debate with former Sen. Ken Jacob, a Democratic candidate. The debate in Wentzville would again be about Onder’s abortion bill, which was the major abortion legislation in the House during the year.

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