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Ameren Illinois

A charging Nissan Leaf.
Nissan

Engineers in Missouri are taking on a challenge that could make owning an electric car far more convenient — building a charging station that fully charges up a car in 10 minutes.

Electric cars can help reduce carbon emissions and the human contribution to climate change. But the time it takes to charge an electric vehicle’s battery represents a major roadblock to owning one. The fastest available technology is the Tesla Supercharger, which takes an hour to fully charge a car.

The U.S. Department of Energy has given $2.9 million to a team of engineers develop fast-charging electric vehicle stations. The team includes engineers from Missouri S&T, Ameren Illinois, battery maker LG Chem Michigan and Bitrode, a St. Louis battery testing company. The goal is to develop a charger that works almost as fast as a gas station, said Jonathan Kimball, an electrical and computer engineer at Missouri University of Science and Technology.

Quincy set to lift state of emergency

Jul 17, 2015
Jamie Bockenfeld-Parrott

(Updated at 1:00 p.m., on Friday, July 17)

Quincy city officials say that the state of emergency will be lifted at noon on Saturday. All streets are now passable and Ameren Illinois reports that nearly everyone's power has been restored.

(Updated at 4:30 p.m., on Wednesday, July 15)

Ameren Illinois reports nearly 10,000 customers remain without power in and around Quincy following Monday night’s powerful thunderstorm that choked the city’s roadways with toppled trees and downed power lines.

Quincy’s mayor Kyle Moore says 70 percent of the city’s streets are now passable and he expects power for most residents to be restored by  Wednesday night.

Garbage and recycling services are suspended for the rest of the week to allow crews to focus on clean up. The mayor says the city’s parks were hardest hit and some may take years to restore their tree canopies.  

(Our original story)

The city of Quincy is recovering after a powerful thunderstorm toppled trees and knocked out power for tens of thousands of area residents Monday night.

Many streets remained blocked by fallen branches and utility poles as of Tuesday afternoon and power is expected to remain off for thousands of homes until at least Wednesday, said Mayor Kyle Moore.