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Ameren

This diagram is an excerpt of “figure 1” from Ameren’s “Detailed Site Investigation,” showing the location of the company’s proposed coal ash landfill.
Ameren Missouri

There’s a new twist in the legal wrangling over Ameren’s plans to build a coal ash landfill in Franklin County.

On Tuesday, Ameren and Franklin County together filed a lawsuit against the Labadie Environmental Organization, a nonprofit made up of area residents opposing the landfill.

electric lines
Tom Taker via Flickr

St. Louisans wishing to comment on the possibility of an increase in their electric bill will have two chances to speak with the Missouri agency that regulates investor-owned utilities Monday.

The Missouri Public Service Commission is holding a public hearing at noon at the Holiday Inn on Watson Road near Kirkwood and another at 6 p.m. at St. Louis Community College-Florissant Valley.

In Dec. 2008, a dike collapsed at TVA's coal-fired power plant near Kingston, Tenn., releasing 1.1 billion gallons of coal ash into the Emory and Clinch rivers and covering about 300 acres of land.
Tennessee Valley Authority

A local environmental group is asking state regulators to deny Ameren’s request to build a new coal ash landfill next to its Labadie power plant in Franklin County, on the basis that the landfill would not comply with new federal regulations.

utility wires, Ameren
(Flickr, sciondriver)

Ameren Missouri officials say the utility will invest $135 million in a three-year energy efficiency plan to begin in 2016.  

Ameren filed the plan with the Missouri Public Service Commission Monday. The utility said it's expected to provide more than $260 million in customer benefits over 20 years.

Ameren’s director of energy efficiency, Dan Laurent, said the plan also is expected to save about 426,000 megawatt hours.

Ameren's 2,400-megawatt plant near Labadie, Missouri, is the state's largest coal-fired power plant. It produces an average of 550,000 tons of coal ash each year.
Véronique LaCapra | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated 10/1/2014 to add comments.

Missouri is making headway toward developing a Comprehensive State Energy Plan Wednesday with the inaugural public meeting in St. Louis of the plan's steering committee.

Also on Wednesday, the state's largest electric energy provider, Ameren, released its energy plan for the next two decades.

Ameren Missouri's largest coal-fired power plant in Labadie, Missouri.
File photo | Veronique LaCapra I St. Louis Public Radio

As expected, the Missouri Public Service Commission has blocked the effort by Noranda Aluminum Inc. to get its electrical bill cut by about 25 percent.

Ameren contended that the cut would have forced rate hikes for most other Missouri customers in the state.

(Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio)

The Environmental Protection Agency's proposed Clean Power Plan will be a historic milestone in the vein of the 1970’s Clean Water and Clean Air acts.

That was Karl Brooks’ message to members of the St. Louis Regional Chamber at a breakfast event Wednesday morning. Brooks is the administrator of EPA’s Region 7, which includes Missouri, Iowa, Kansas and Nebraska.

The Clean Power Plan proposes cutting power plants' carbon emissions by 30 percent by the year 2030.

Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio

Updated 7/25/14 with information on a new lawsuit.

The Labadie Environmental Organization (LEO) has filed another lawsuit in their long-running campaign to prevent Ameren from building a coal ash landfill in Franklin County.

Image courtesy of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources

The Missouri Public Service Commission has signed off on Ameren Missouri's plan to build a coal ash landfill at its power plant in Franklin County.

The five member commission unanimously granted the utility company’s request for a Certificate of Convenience and Necessity on Wednesday. That certificate gives Ameren the ability to expand the area of its Labadie power plant to build the new landfill.

Ameren Missouri's largest coal-fired power plant in Labadie, Missouri.
File photo | Veronique LaCapra I St. Louis Public Radio

The Environment Protection Agency’s proposed regulations on carbon emissions released earlier this month are sparking debate on whether the rule changes will create jobs or kill jobs.

The new rules seek to reduce American’s carbon dioxide emissions from the power sector by 30 percent by 2030 from 2005 levels. States have until June 30, 2016 to draft plans for how to reduce their average emissions.

(Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio)

On Tuesday night at Harris Stowe University, St. Louis area residents will finally get a chance to weigh in on a utility battle that – one way or another -- will likely affect how much they pay for electricity.

Conducted by Missouri’s Public Service Commission (PSC), which oversees utilities, the 6 p.m. hearing will center on two dueling narratives:

This map shows the approximate location of groundwater drinking wells near Ameren's proposed coal ash landfill in Franklin County. It was created based on Missouri Department of Natural Resources well location data.
Labadie Environmental Organization

Updated on Wed., May 28.

Critics of Ameren's proposed coal ash landfill in Franklin County argued Tuesday that it would sometimes be sitting in groundwater.

That's a problem, because most Franklin County residents get their drinking water from groundwater wells ― and coal ash contains toxic substances like arsenic and lead.

This map shows the approximate location of groundwater drinking wells near Ameren's proposed coal ash landfill in Franklin County. It was created based on Missouri Department of Natural Resources well location data.
Labadie Environmental Organization

The Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MDNR) is hosting a meeting on Tuesday to get public input on Ameren's plans to build a coal ash landfill next to its power plant in Franklin County.

The meeting will focus on whether the agency should grant Ameren a landfill construction permit.

Ameren Missouri's Vice President of External Affairs and Communications, Warren Wood, said the new coal ash landfill will be state-of-the-art.

Stephanie Zimmerman, St. Louis Public Radio

Those in Missouri’s solar industry are losing their sunny outlook.

A combination of lower solar equipment costs, a federal tax incentive, and an attractive state-mandated rebate pushed sales through the roof in 2013. The solar industry reported an additional 1,700 jobs in the state.

Ameren Missouri's largest coal-fired power plant in Labadie, Missouri.
File photo | Veronique LaCapra I St. Louis Public Radio

Updated at 12:45 p.m. with additional information, new state from Ameren.

The Sierra Club is following through on its threat to sue Ameren Missouri over emissions from three of the company's coal-fired power plants.

Sierra Club Alleges Thousands Of Air Quality Violations At Ameren's St. Louis-Area Plants

Dec 12, 2013
Sarah Skiold-Hanlin, St. Louis Public Radio & The Beacon

Updated Thursday 10:15 p.m.

The Sierra Club says Ameren has been routinely violating air quality standards at its St. Louis-area power plants.

In a Notice of Intent to Sue delivered to Ameren on Wednesday afternoon, the Sierra Club alleges the company's Labadie, Meramec, and Rush Island plants have exceeded air pollution limits almost 10,000 times since 2008.

via Google Maps

Despite concerns raised by some members of the St. Louis County Council and local environmental groups, Ameren says its coal fired Meramec Power Plant does not pose a public health risk.

On Tuesday night, members of the St. Louis County Council heard a presentation from Ameren geared toward answering concerns about the environmental impact of the company’s power plant in Oakville.

A key issue is ground water testing near so-called coal ash ponds. Coal ash, a byproduct from coal power plants that contains heavy metals, is stored in ponds near the plant.

EPA Holds Public Hearing Over Coal Ash Contamination In Jefferson County

Aug 22, 2013
(via Google Maps)

The Environmental Protection Agency is holding a public hearing Thursday evening about a proposed agreement to address water pollution from the illegal disposal of coal ash from Ameren’s Rush Island Power Plant.

According to the EPA, approximately 140,000 tons of ash containing heavy metals and other toxic substances contaminated Jefferson County wetlands, an unnamed tributary to Plattin Creek and a portion of Willers Lake.

Ameren Missouri

Missouri's sole nuclear power plant is back online after being shut down for more than three weeks.

Ameren Missouri's Callaway Energy Center was taken off line July 26 after an electrical arc caused a small fire.  The plant resumed operations Sunday morning.  Spokesman Cleve Reasoner says the arc was triggered when a ventilation louver came loose and got too close to the power cables.

"Testing confirmed that there was no impact to the major components," Reasoner said. "So the repairs were those that were associated directly with correction of the arc damage."

St. Louis County Officials Call For Stricter Regulation Of Ameren's Meramec Power Plant

Aug 6, 2013
(via Google Maps)

Updated at 3:45 p.m. on August 14, 2013 and at 11:10 a.m. on August 15, 2013 (to add comment from Ameren).

Another St. Louis County official is calling for tighter pollution controls at Ameren's Meramec power plant.

St. Louis County Executive Charlie Dooley today released a letter he sent to the Environmental Protection Agency, urging the agency to pursue sulfur dioxide controls at the Meramec plant.

Ameren Missouri

Missouri's lone nuclear reactor remains shut down while workers and officials continue to investigate what caused a small fire at the Callaway County plant Friday night.

Ameren Missouri spokesman Cleve Reasoner said it'll be several days before the plant is back online.

"We are assessing impacts from the arc that we had in our cable leading from the plant," Reasoner said. "We've begun disassembling equipment and investigating what the nature of the damage is and what the nature of the cause(s) of the event are."

(courtesy Ameren)

Ameren-Missouri officials say a small fire in a turbine building last night has prompted them to temporarily shut down the nuclear power plant near Fulton, Mo.

The fire was put out quickly, no injuries have been reported and at no time did the situation threaten the public or nearby communities, according to a statement released by Ameren-Missouri.

According to an Ameren-Missouri release:

National Report Condemns Coal Ash Water Pollution From Ameren's Labadie Plant

Jul 23, 2013
Sarah Skiold-Hanlin, St. Louis Public Radio

A new report released Tuesday by a coalition of environmental groups focuses on the need to revamp national water pollution standards for coal-fired power plants.

The report cites Ameren's Labadie power plant in Franklin County as one of the worst waterway polluters in the nation.

There remains no public health threat from an underground fire at the Bridgeton Landfill that is burning near radioactive waste that was illegally buried at the nearby West Lake Landfill.

That was the message delivered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to hundreds of residents who packed the Pattonville High School in north St. Louis County Tuesday night.

(Map created for the Labadie Environmental Organization based on Missouri Department of Natural Resources well location data)

Environmental groups are once again urging state officials to require groundwater monitoring at Ameren’s coal-fired power plants in eastern Missouri.

The Sierra Club and Labadie Environmental Organization submitted a letter to the Missouri Department of Natural Resources on Thursday asking the state not to allow Ameren to build new coal ash landfills before testing groundwater for contamination.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Legislation has stalled in the Missouri Senate that would allow investor-owned electric companies to charge consumers for infrastructure improvements.

Opponents argued that Ameren Missouri, Empire District and Kansas City Power and Light (KCP&L) make enough money to pay for improvements without levying an Infrastructure System Replacement Surcharge (ISRS) on their customers.  Several Senators are blocking the measure, including Republican Rob Schaaf of St. Joseph.

Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio

A small but vocal group of protesters gathered outside Ameren Missouri's headquarters in St. Louis today to voice their opposition to the company's plans to build several new coal ash landfills.

Updated 3:51 p.m. April 4

Ameren Missouri released a statement today saying that the plant is operating safely, but did not release any further details about those injured. An excerpt of the statement: 

Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio

A local environmental group filed an appeal this morning in an ongoing effort to keep Ameren from building a coal ash landfill next to its power plant in Labadie.

Last month, a circuit court judge ruled that the Franklin County Commission was in the right when it approved a zoning amendment that would allow construction of the landfill.

But a group of 12 Labadie families, led by the grassroots Labadie Environmental Organization, is challenging that decision.

Fergus Randall | Flickr

One of Illinois's largest natural gas providers is seeking a $50 million rate increase for its 813,000 customers.

Ameren Illinois filed the paperwork requesting the rate case with the Illinois Commerce Commission today. The company says it needs the additional revenue to recoup infrastructure investments and cover the rising costs of delivering natural gas.

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