Ameren | St. Louis Public Radio

Ameren

Ruling Helps Ameren's Labadie Coal Ash Landfill Move Forward

Jan 11, 2013
This diagram is an excerpt of “figure 1” from Ameren’s “Detailed Site Investigation,” showing the location of the company’s proposed coal ash landfill.
Ameren Missouri

A judge has ruled in favor of an effort to develop a new coal ash landfill in eastern Missouri's Franklin County.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that the judge on Friday rejected claims that the Franklin County Commission acted unlawfully in approving a zoning amendment for the landfill.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Dec. 14, 2012 - Along with a $260 million rate increase, Ameren Missouri will be allowed to continue to charge customers for the rising costs of transmission projects still under construction. Currently, the costs are about $26 million but are expected to rise 24 percent each year.

On Wednesday, the Missouri Public Service Commission approved a $260 million rate increase for Ameren, about two-thirds of what the company had sought. The hike goes into effect Jan. 2.

Regulators Approve $260M Rate Increase For Ameren

Dec 12, 2012
(via Flickr/[F]oxymoron_0350)

Updated 4:11 p.m. with approximate breakdown of increase for consumers.

Missouri utility regulators have approved a $260 million rate increase for electric customers of Ameren Missouri.

The rate increase approved Wednesday is intended to cover such things as the utility's rising fuel costs, infrastructure improvements, vegetation trimming and storm repairs.

About $90 million of the rate increase goes toward energy efficiency programs that could ultimately save money for residents and businesses.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Dec. 11, 2012 - Even though Missouri law bars utilities from charging their customers for construction projects that haven't produced any power, Ameren Missouri has tacked $10 million onto Missouri customers' bills for power lines that it hasn't even started to build yet.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Nov. 21, 2012 - Despite disappointing news from the Department of Energy, Ameren Missouri says it is pressing ahead with its partners to make small nuclear reactors a key part of economic development in the state.

It just isn’t sure how much federal money may be available, when it may be awarded or what changes to its approach it may need to make to be successful in the next round.

A collaboration between St. Louis-based Ameren Missouri and Westinghouse Electric Corporation to develop small modular nuclear reactors was passed over Tuesday for initial

funding by the U.S. Department of Energy.

The DOE will, instead, fund a similar project by Babcock & Wilcox and the Tennessee Valley Authority. The Ameren/Westinghouse partnership was seeking $452 million in funding to build the SMR's alongside the utility's Callaway county reactor.

Ameren Rallies Support For Nuclear Plans

Oct 30, 2012
Ameren Missouri

The St. Louis-based utility company Ameren is continuing to rally support for its plan to build small modular nuclear reactors in Missouri.

Together with its partner in the venture, Westinghouse Electric Company, Ameren held what it called a “supplier summit” today in St. Louis.

(National Weather Service)

Updated at 7:50 am Sunday with information about Red Cross volunteers.

Ameren says it is sending more than 100 employees Saturday to New England to help with any problems caused by Hurricane Sandy.

Sandy is expected to be a monstrous storm that poses a serious threat for the entire Eastern Seaboard. Forecasters say Sandy is a massive cyclone, with hurricane-force winds recorded as far as 100 miles away from the eye of the storm.

Morning headlines: Thursday, August 30, 2012

Aug 30, 2012
(via Flickr/IndofunkSatish)

Ameren monitoring Isaac

Officials with Ameren say they are closely monitoring Hurricane Isaac's progress now that it has made land fall. Projections from the National Weather Service indicate the remnants of the storm could pass over Missouri and Illinois this weekend.

Kevin Anders, Ameren Missouri's manager of distribution services, says that could mean a lot of rain and - potentially - some high winds or tornadoes.

Ameren gears up for a new energy efficiency program

Aug 10, 2012

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Aug. 10, 2012 - Ameren Missouri is getting plans in place to implement the energy efficiency programs the Missouri Public Service Commission gave a green light to earlier this month. These will constitute the largest energy-savings plan in the history of the state.

(via Google Maps)

Updated at 3:15 p.m. on Aug. 8, 2012:

The Missouri Department of Natural Resources will hold another public awareness session Aug. 14. This one will focus on the permitting process for a proposed coal ash landfill at Ameren's Meramec power plant near Arnold, Mo.

The proposed landfill site is located at 8200 Fine Road, approximately 3.6 miles southeast of the intersection of Interstate 55 and Route 141. Ameren is preparing a detailed site investigation work plan. The session is scheduled for 6:30 p.m. at Rogers Elementary School, 7700 Fine Road in St. Louis.

Representatives of MDNR and Ameren will be available to answer questions.

Original story posted 5:53 p.m. Aug. 7, 2012:

The St. Louis-based utility company Ameren is proposing to build a coal ash landfill at its Rush Island power plant in Jefferson County, about 10 miles southeast of Festus.

The Missouri Department of Natural Resources is holding a public awareness session tonight to describe the permitting process for the landfill.

(courtesy Ameren)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has put a freeze on issuing licenses for new plants and 20-year renewals for existing ones following a ruling by a federal Appeals Court.

The US Court of Appeals for the DC Circuit ruled in June that the practice of allowing nuclear plants to store spent fuel rods on site doesn’t meet federal environmental standards.  The decision in essence bars the awarding of any new licenses until the industry begins addressing the problem of storing nuclear waste.

(via Flickr/spacepleb)

Missouri utility regulators have given approval for what Ameren Missouri calls the most aggressive energy efficiency plan ever in the state.

Under the plan approved Wednesday by the Missouri Public Service Commission, Ameren will invest $147 million over three years in several programs that seek to reduce electricity use by 800 million megawatt-hours.

The plan was part of a negotiated settlement among Ameren, PSC staff, consumer advocates and environmental groups.

Congresswoman looks to limit authority of FERC

Jul 30, 2012
(via Flickr/John Picken)

A U.S. Representative from southwest Missouri wants to reduce federal authority over hydroelectric projects.

Local task force assigned to Ameren, Westinghouse nuclear project

Jul 23, 2012
(courtesy Ameren)

Governor Jay Nixon (D) has announced the formation of a task force to help Missouri land a federal grant to build small modular nuclear reactors, or SMR’s.

The task force is made up of officials from counties adjacent to Ameren Missouri’s Callaway County nuclear plant, which would build the reactors in a joint project with Westinghouse.  Nixon says it’s important to have input from local-level officials.

(Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio)

The Public Service Commission heard details Monday on Ameren Missouri’s proposed efficiency plan.

The proposal is designed to promote energy efficiency while still allowing the St. Louis-based utility to earn a profit.  It has an estimated price tag of $145 million and it would be paid by the utility’s customers, whose residential bills on average would be about $3 a month higher.  But Ameren Missouri’s Warren Wood says if approved, customers would save money in the long run.

Morning headlines- Thursday, July 5, 2012

Jul 5, 2012
(via Flickr/IndofunkSatish)

Federal government will not fund reservoir repairs

The federal government has rejected a request from Ameren Missouri to receive stimulus funds for rebuilding the Taum Sauk reservoir that ruptured in 2005.

(via Flickr/Jack W. Reid)

Thermostats turned to extra low and the blistering heat has put added stress on Ameren Missouri's power system.

There have been a handful of small power outages throughout the region, but so far nothing major.  And looking at a week of triple digit high temperatures, Ameren Missouri says it’s ready to take on the extended heat wave.

(courtesy Ameren)

Ameren's request to renew the operating license for its Callaway Nuclear Power Plant with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, for the next 20 years, has garnered another legal challenge.

(via Ameren Illinois)

Ameren Illinois has a new Chairman, President and CEO. Effective immediately, Richard Mark, 57, replaces Scott Cisel, who has "left the company to pursue other interests."

The move is an internal one for Ameren, as Mark jumps over the Mississippi from his former post as senior vice president of customer operations for Ameren Missouri. He's been with the company since 2002.

Shifting into Mark's old spot is Michael Moehn, who will leave a similar post at Ameren Illinois.

 

 

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, June 7, 2012 - Even if opponents of a license extension for Ameren’s Callaway County nuclear plant don’t succeed, they hope their efforts will have long-term effects on nuclear power in Missouri and beyond.

Executives from Ameren Missouri and Westinghouse presented their plans today to the state Public Service Commission for pursuing grants to build small nuclear reactors.

The two companies have teamed up to pursue up to $452 million from Washington to build up to five Small Modular Reactors, or SMR’s, at Ameren’s Callaway County plant Joseph Zwetolitz is President of the Americas division of Westinghouse.  He says SMR’s would be safer than the traditional nuclear reactor.

“This reactor is almost entirely underground, which provides an additional level of safety, with regards to potential postulated accidents, deliberate attacks, tornadoes, those kind of things," Zwetolitz said.

Morning headlines - Wednesday, June 6, 2012

Jun 6, 2012
(via Flickr/IndofunkSatish)

Ameren, Westinghouse to give more details on nuclear partnership

Missouri regulators will learn more today about a proposal to build small nuclear reactors at Ameren Missouri's Callaway nuclear power plant.

Regulators OK new boundaries at Lake of the Ozarks

Jun 5, 2012
(via Flickr/John Picken)

CORRECTION: We incorrectly referred to Congresswoman Vicky Hartzler's press secretary as "Steve Schwartz" in an earlier version of this post. His name is Steve Walsh. We apologize for the error.

Updated at 3:12 p.m. and 4:45 p.m. with more details.

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission today approved Ameren Missouri's plan to reduce the amount of land the company owns and manages along the shoreline of the Lake of the Ozarks.

Are you an Ameren customer? Beware of new scam

May 16, 2012
(via Flickr/[F]oxymoron_0350)

The St. Louis-based utility company Ameren is urging customers to watch out for a scam aimed at illegally obtaining Social Security numbers.

Ameren says utility customers in several states, including Ameren customers in Missouri and Illinois, are being falsely told that the federal government will provide a credit or directly pay utility bills. The scammers seek the customer's Social Security number as part of the fraudulent effort to obtain the credit or payment.

(via Ameren Missouri website)

Last week, we reported that Ameren was conducting limited groundwater testing near its coal-fired power plant in Labadie.

The results of that testing are now posted in a report on the company’s website. According to that report, levels of boron, arsenic, and other contaminants from three sampling wells were all below regulatory health limits.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, April 26, 2012 - After years of stalled attempts to build a second large nuclear reactor in Callaway County, Ameren Missouri now wants to change course and install one or more smaller modular reactors on the site.

But while the size and the technology may be different, the players and the arguments for and against such a move are largely the same.

Updated 2:15 p.m. with link to full legal document.

A St. Louis-based environmental group is asking the federal government to more closely scrutinize Ameren Corp.'s request for a 20-year license renewal at Missouri's only nuclear power plant.

(Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio)

Three Ameren shareholder proposals were voted down today at the company’s annual shareholder meeting in St. Louis.

The proposals sought to have Ameren identify and address environmental problems related to its coal-fired power plants.

Sister Barbara Jennings coordinates the Midwest Coalition for Responsible Investment, a faith-based advocacy group that seeks to influence the policies of corporations.

Westinghouse Electric Corporation and St. Louis-based Ameren Missouri will collaborate on developing small modular nuclear reactors, or SMR’s, and will seek to build them at Ameren’s Callaway County plant.

Westinghouse officials say they’ll apply for $452 million in federal funding.  Plans are to build at least one and possibly five SMR's alongside Callaway’s current reactor, and to build more SMR’s at the site for export.  Governor Jay Nixon (D) described the economic potential as enormous.

Pages