Behind the Headlines | St. Louis Public Radio

Behind the Headlines

U.S. President Donald J. Trump delivers his remarks to a crowd of invited guests in St. Charles, Missouri on November 29, 2017.
Kae Petrin | St. Louis Public Radio

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, we went Behind the Headlines on the presidential visit of Donald Trump to St. Charles this week. Joining the program for the discussion was Jo Mannies, political reporter at St. Louis Public Radio. She’s covered numerous presidential visits to the St. Louis area, dating back to Jimmy Carter.

Mannies noted key moments that happened during Trump’s visit and how attendees reacted to the presence of the press. She also shared a memorable experience when she covered President Bill Clinton.

Listen to the full discussion:

 

U.S. President Donald J. Trump delivers his remarks to a crowd of invited guests in St. Charles, Missouri on November 29, 2017.
Brit Hanson | St. Louis Public Radio

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, we went Behind the Headlines on the visit of President Donald Trump to St. Charles this week. While presidential visits are a source of pride for a community, they can also be disruptive.

Lt. Chad Fisk with the St. Charles Police Department joined host Don Marsh to give insight on how the department prepared for the visit.

Fisk said the department worked with other local and state law enforcement agencies to develop strategies to deal with demonstrators and ensure a safe outcome for the event. 

Reedy Press owner Josh Stevens talks about the damages done to his business from a warehouse fire.
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

This week, a warehouse five-alarm fire near 39th Street and Park Avenue caused substantial damage and losses. Among the warehouse’s tenants is Reedy Press, a local book publishing company.

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked to Reedy Press owner Josh Stevens about the damages done to his business from the fire. He said the experience has been traumatic. 

Susannah Lohr | St. Louis Public Radio

The outcome of Tuesday’s election to raise the city’s sales tax by a half-cent came down to turnout and money. 

“You have to look at the money what was spent if you want to say okay, well, how could we have gotten our message out further, how could we have let people know that this isn’t the only mechanism.” said Alderman Dan Guenther, D-9th Ward.

Guenther’s ward was one of only four that voted against Proposition P. It passed in parts of the city with majority white and majority black populations. 

Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

Treasurer Tishaura Jones is calling on St. Louis residents to vote against Proposition P on Nov. 7 – a half-cent sales tax increase that will fund public safety efforts.

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked to Jones, who said sales taxes are regressive and disproportionally affect the poor.

Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis voters will decide on Nov. 7 whether to increase the city’s sales tax by a half cent to fund increased public safety efforts.

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked to St. Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson, who endorses the ballot measure Proposition P.

Sidney Watson, the Jane and Bruce Robert Professor at Saint Louis University’s Health Law Policy Center
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, Don Marsh talked with Saint Louis University health law professor Sidney Watson about the just released 2018 premiums for policies through the Affordable Care Act and discuss how Missourians and St. Louisans will fare.

This Behind the Headlines discussion was a follow-up to a conversation about what's happening with healthcare in the United States.

Flickr

Prior to Thursday’s deadline to submit a bid to Amazon to host its second North American headquarters, it was well known that the Kansas City and St. Louis metropolitan areas were planning to submit bids.

What wasn’t widely known is that Missouri submitted its own proposal.

Faisel Khan, Brad Stoner and Maheen Bokhari
Aaron Doerr | St. Louis Public Radio

There was a hubbub earlier this week when St. Louis, which recently lost its crown for having the highest STD rates in the country to Alabama, was found out to be on top once again due to an accounting error.

Rachel Lippmann | St. Louis Public Radio

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh discussed how protests over the Stockley verdict have evolved.

Earlier this week, St. Louis police arrested 143 demonstrators after Interstate 64 was blocked for a time.

File photo | Ryan Delaney | St. Louis Public Radio

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, we went “Behind the Headlines” with updates from the second week of protests in response to the Jason Stockley acquittal.

Reporter Willis Ryder Arnold and Executive Editor Shula Neuman, from the St. Louis Public Radio newsroom, joined the program to help bring us up to speed.

Protesters sit at the intersection of Maryland and Euclid for a moment of silence on Friday night.
File photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Throughout the week, St. Louis on the Air has been hearing from listeners about their thoughts on the Stockley verdict and protests following it. Many have expressed disagreement with the verdict, but we’ve also heard from those who agreed with the verdict or who disagree with protesters’ tactics.

Protesters linked arms on Sept. 15, 2017 in downtown St. Louis on Tucker St.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Programming note: St. Louis on the Air will return at 10 p.m. with a special live check-in with St. Louis Public Radio reporters and editors covering the community's response to the Stockley verdict. You can listen live and follow updates from our Twitter account at @STLonAir.

The audio embedded below is from an earlier version of the program, which aired at 12 p.m.

St. Louis Public Radio reporter Jason Rosenbaum
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh spoke with St. Louis Public Radio political reporter Jason Rosenbaum about the ongoing fallout and what might happen after controversial comments made by a Democratic and Republican state legislator.

State Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal made a Facebook comment wishing for President Donald Trump’s assassination.

State Rep. Warren Love commented that people who damage Confederate statues should be found and hanged from a tree.

Amid recent and ongoing destruction caused by Hurricane Harvey, the recovery effort will take center stage.

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked with Suzanna Long, professor and department chair of engineering management and systems engineering at Missouri S&T in Rolla.

They addressed what a comprehensive recovery plan looks like and assess the potential for disasters in Missouri.

An illustration of Missouri death-row inmate Marcellus Williams.
Rici Hoffarth | St. Louis Public Radio

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, we went Behind the Headlines to delve into the news that Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens granted a stay of execution for Marcellus Williams.

Crystal Martin, Haley Shoaf and Tamarah Usher discuss  the challenges women in the tech and startup world face.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Last week, news began circulating of a controversial internal memo, written by a former senior software engineer at Google, titled “Google’s Ideological Echo Chamber,” which called for Google to replace diversity initiatives with “ideological diversity” initiatives.

Wes Mullins and Darlene Grene joined St. Louis on the Air on Friday, and Traci Blackmon joined by phone.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, we’ll go “Behind the Headlines.” This week, we discussed the current issues impacting African-American people in the LGBTQ community.

This week, St. Louis is host to a national conference sponsored by the Metropolitan Community Church of Greater St. Louis called “Grounded in Love,” running through Aug. 5.

Joining the program to discuss the topic:

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, we went Behind the Headlines with a top news story from the week. This week, we delved into the effects on pro abortion rights advocates and organizations of the legislation passed on July 25 to place further restrictions on abortion in Missouri.

For more background, read St. Louis Public Radio reporter Jason Rosenbaum’s story on the regulations from earlier this week.

Gov. Eric Greitens sits down for an interview with St. Louis Public Radio in downtown St. Louis on July 17, 2017.
File photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

In the span of a week, Gov. Eric Greitens unveiled two high-profile proposals: A proposal aimed at reducing violent crime in St. Louis and a statewide prescription drug monitoring program.

Critics of the Republican governor contended the plans lacked specificity – and questioned whether either proposal would stem the tide of St. Louis violence or opioid abuse. But in an interview with St. Louis Public Radio on Monday, Greitens positioned his two plans as "bold" action that should have been taken a long time ago.

Pages