Bird migration | St. Louis Public Radio

Bird migration

Wildlife Rescue Center intern Katelyn Milbrandt feeds an orphaned Virginia possum. Wildlife rescuers in St. Louis have had to overhaul their work routines due to the pandemic during their busiest time of year.
Wildlife Rescue Center

For Joe Hoffmann, spring is like the dinner rush at a restaurant. 

But instead of customers, there are rows of hungry baby birds, demanding to be fed.

“It’s just crazy,” said Hoffmann, executive director of Wild Bird Rehabilitation in Overland. “We're working from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. every day, constantly feeding them.”

Wildlife rescuers in St. Louis are gearing up for the springtime influx of orphaned animals, as baby birds, squirrels and rabbits begin arriving in droves. But this year, the coronavirus pandemic is forcing organizations to make major changes to keep staff and volunteers from getting sick.

The Arch lights will be turned off from Sept. 17 to Sept. 30, 2018.
Jason Lusk | Flickr

The lights illuminating the Gateway Arch will go dark for two weeks beginning Monday.

The decision is part of a biannual effort to avoid disrupting bird migrations along the Mississippi Flyway — a critical route used by more than 300 North American bird species. Light pollution from upward-facing spotlights can disorient birds that migrate at night and cause them to collide with buildings.