Classical Music | St. Louis Public Radio

Classical Music

Washington University composer Christopher Stark's "Seasonal Music" explores the ways our environment is changing. (Dec. 5, 2019)
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

A growing number of artists are trying to start a conversation about climate change — without words or data. 

Some, like Washington University composer Christopher Stark, are communicating their anxiety about climate change through music. His newly released string quartet, “Seasonal Music,” explores the ways our environment is changing in real time.

Musicans Kev Marcus (at left) and Wil B. make up hip-hop violin duo Black Violin. Their performance at the Touhill Performing Arts Center on Nov. 17 was their final show of 2019.
Lara Hamdan | St. Louis Public Radio

Hip-hop violin duo Black Violin performed their final concert of the year last night at the Touhill Performing Arts Center. Concertgoers danced and vibed to a setlist fused with what Black Violin crafts well — classical music and hip-hop.

Violinist Kevin Sylvester, also known as Kev Marcus, and violist Wilner Baptiste, also known as Wil B., make up the group. They released their new album “Take the Stairs” earlier this month. PBS described the pair as “two former high school orchestra nerds who use their love of Bach and Beethoven to reimagine classical music and connect with new audiences.”

The classically trained musicians joined Sarah Fenkse on St. Louis on the Air alongside St. Louis artist Brandon McCadney, known as Mad Keys. McCadney is classically trained in violin and plays the piano. 

Kyle Wernke conducts the Missouri S&T Orchestra.
John Francis

ROLLA — Kyle Wernke is an up-and-coming composer, but he doesn’t teach at a high-profile music school. 

There are no music majors in his orchestra, and the students spend more time on equations than they do on scales. Wernke teaches at Missouri University of Science and Technology, a school known much more for engineering than for performing arts.

New Symphony CEO Discusses Her Role, Goals

Feb 13, 2015
Marie-Hélène Bernard of St. Louis Symphony
Courtesy of St. Louis Symphony

Marie-Hélène Bernard believes music connects things. People. History. Literature. Sports. And, for Bernard, law.

As a teenager, Bernard played the viola da gamba professionally. Then she became a lawyer, practicing corporate and tax law. But something was missing.

“I realized that music was really a calling, and I could bring skills that the music field needed, both from the business legal standpoint and music and management standpoint,” she told “Cityscape” host Jim Kirchherr on Friday.