Department of Health and Senior Services | St. Louis Public Radio

Department of Health and Senior Services

A recent study in the U.S. indicated that 3.6 million teens used e-cigarettes in 2018, a steep climb from 1.5 million teens in 2017.
File | Lara Hamdan | St. Louis Public Radio

Calling vaping-related illnesses among Missouri’s youth an epidemic, Missouri Gov. Mike Parson on Tuesday signed an executive order mandating education to discourage usage. 

Thousands have been sickened across the country due to vaping-related illnesses. In Missouri, there have been 22 reported illnesses and one death as of Oct. 4. The majority of those cases involve people between the ages of 15 and 24. 

Murphy Lee poses for a portrait at Vape Ya Tailfeather in St. Charles.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri health officials have confirmed two cases in the state of a mysterious vaping-related pulmonary illness that has sickened hundreds of people across the nation. 

Missouri officials are investigating the cases of seven other patients to determine if their symptoms match the criteria for the illness. They’re also warning consumers not to tamper with vaping products.

Patients with the illness report nausea, shortness of breath, fever and elevated heart rates. The nine Missouri patients have reported modifying pre-packaged vaping products to smoke other substances such as vitamin E or THC, said Randall Williams, director of the state Department of Health and Senior Services.

A volunteer with Coalition for Life St. Louis protests outside Planned Parenthood on Forest Park Avenue.
File photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

A federal judge has put a hold on Missouri’s eight-week abortion ban, but has left other provisions of the controversial law intact.

The parts of the law that prohibit abortions because of race, sex or Down syndrome diagnosis and updated requirements to pre-abortion counseling went into effect last week. Doctors say those new regulations victimize patients and compromise doctors’ medical ethics. 

Randall Williams appears before the Missouri Senate committee on Gubernatorial Appointments on March 1, 2017.
Marshall Griffin |St. Louis Public Radio

Gov. Eric Greitens' nominee to run the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services faced some tough questions Wednesday about his previous job in North Carolina. 

Randall Williams was North Carolina's public health director for about a year and a half. Officials had said that hundreds of wells near Duke Energy power plants were deemed to be contaminated by what's left over when coal is burned. Williams, however, reversed a written warning to the well owners about those toxins. 

 

Senator Gina Walsh, D-St. Louis County, asked Williams why he did that.

Bac Le, 70, picks up his grandson after studying for his citizenship test with a tutor from Bilingual International Assistant Services. Le moved to St. Louis from Vietnam to be near his children.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Between learning U.S. civics and history to acing all four parts of the naturalization exam — passing the U.S. citizenship test is no walk in the park. For older immigrants who don’t speak English, the learning curve can be even steeper.

“Think about your own grandmother,” said Jason Baker, executive director with Bilingual International Assistant Services. “Imagine her trying to learn a completely foreign language at an advanced age. And then in that foreign language learn about the Federalist Papers and be able to produce it on command. Some grandmothers will be able to do it. Others will not. Mine certainly couldn’t.”

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, March 8, 2011 - A new federal report on elder abuse misstates the money and services that Missouri devotes to the problem, a state official says. The report, issued this month by the Government Accountability Office, says Missouri had more than 21,000 reported cases of elder abuse and investigated none of them during the 2009 fiscal year, which ran from July 1, 2008 to June 30, 2009.

KRCG-TV

Two state office buildings in Jefferson City were evacuated today, due to large amounts of snow on the roofs.

More than 550 people work in the two buildings, which house the Missouri Dept. of Health and Senior Services.