Ethnicity | St. Louis Public Radio

Ethnicity

(May 27, 2019) Alyson Thompson is founder and organizer on Mixed Feelings, a meeting group dedicated to building community among multiracial and multiethnic identities. She talked about it on Tuesday's "St. Louis on the Air."
Lara Hamdan | St. Louis Public Radio

When St. Louisan Alyson Thompson watched “The Loving Generation” documentary, she instantly felt heard and affirmed in her identity of being born to one black and one white parent. It also prompted her to start Mixed Feelings, a group for multiracial people seeking community among other multiracial and multiethnic individuals through curated meetups and events.

Vince Bantu (left) listens to speaker SueJeanne Koh at the Summit for Future Theological Educators of Color, a conference held in Evanston, Ilinois, in the summer of 2014.
Vince Bantu | Jubilee Community Church

What exactly is an “inter-minority" dialogue?

For Vince Lee Bantu, it’s a space for where people of color can come share their common cultural experiences and nuanced struggles while building connections.

On Saturday, Inter-Minority Dialogue is an event with workshops that will explore topics that include “Latinos, Immigration, and the Church;” “Being Arab in St. Louis;” and “Partnering with Refugees.” Organized by local faith leaders like Bantu to focus on the experiences of people of color, the event will take place at Comunidad Cristiana Vida Abundante, 1216 Sidney St., in St. Louis.

(via Flickr/OregonDOT)

Earlier this year the Corporation for Public Broadcasting awarded NPR a $1.5 million grant to launch a major journalism initiative to deepen coverage of race, ethnicity and culture, and to capture the issues that define an increasingly diverse America.

A new analysis suggests racial and ethnic minorities are not getting equal treatment when it comes to strokes.

At the request of the American Heart Association, a group of stroke experts led by Saint Louis University neurologist Dr. Salvador Cruz-Flores examined the scientific literature for racial and ethnic disparities in stroke care.

Commentary: Ethnic studies still needed

May 13, 2010

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, May 13, 2010 - Arizona continues to be in the news for legislation that is possibly racially charged. The most recent source of controversy is House Bill 2281 (pdf), which would ban ethnic studies classes. More generally, it would write colorblindness into the law.

The bill states that schools cannot include courses that (1) are designed primarily for pupils of a particular ethnic group and (2) advocate ethnic solidarity instead of the treatment of pupils as individuals.