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Real estate agent Shawn Uhe speaks during a press conference at the Better Business Bureau in St. Louis about being a target of business email fraud. 9/26/19
Andrea Smith | St. Louis Public Radio

Internet security officials in St. Louis and around the country report a growing number of email scams that stole more than a billion dollars from businesses and individuals in 2018.

A Better Business Bureau report released Thursday says the amount of money email scammers stole tripled between 2016 and 2018. 

People in the St. Louis area recently have been the targets of scammers posing as religious leaders, the YMCA and the Better Business Bureau, said Steve Baker, an investigator for the bureau.

Journalists Trevor Aaronson (at left) and Danny Wicentowski both joined Wednesday's talk show.
Trevor Aaronson & St. Louis Public Radio

"How has the death of Michael Brown Jr. impacted your life?" That's among the questions that the St. Louis Public Radio community and people throughout the region have been pondering in recent days in light of the five-year anniversary of the Ferguson protests. The answers are myriad, but Olajuwon Davis’ certainly stands out in the crowd: He’s spent most of his life since that time in prison.

How and why Davis’ life changed so drastically in the wake of Brown’s death is the focus of a newly published report by the Riverfront Times’ Danny Wicentowski. In it, Wicentowski details everything from the moment Davis, then a member of the New Black Panther Party, first became active in Ferguson to his arrest and conviction in an FBI sting for “planning and conspiring to ignite explosive devices” among other charges. Prosecutors would allege he and his alleged co-conspirator Brandon Baldwin sought to blow up the Gateway Arch.

FBI special agent Lesley Edge demonstrates her firearms skills on July 15, 2019. Edge is the only female firearms instructor in the St. Louis field office of the FBI.
Rachel Lippmann | St. Louis Public Radio

Only 20% of FBI agents nationwide are women — and that number is less in St. Louis: 10%.

So, the bureau hopes an event scheduled for July 24 in St. Louis will encourage more women to consider the FBI as a career.

Police officers line up on Washington Ave. in downtown St. Louis on Sept. 28, 2018 as people protest against the Stockley verdict and against mass arrests during a protest the previous week.
File photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated at 7:15 p.m. with comments from St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner — Four St. Louis police officers were indicted on federal charges Thursday in connection with the assault of an undercover officer during protests related to the Jason Stockley court ruling in 2017.

The four St. Louis Metropolitan Police officers named in the indictment are Dustin Boone, 35, Bailey Colletta, 25, Randy Hays, 31, and Christopher Myers, 27. All have been suspended without pay.

"St. Louis on the Air" host Don Marsh spoke with the former FBI director, who is pictured here during a 2016 event at the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama.
FBI | Flickr

James Comey expressed both concern and hope about the state of U.S. institutions and the rule of law during a St. Louis Public Radio interview on Wednesday.

“I think we’re in two different places,” the former FBI director told St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh. “We’re in a place where the president of the United States relentlessly attacks the rule of law and the institutions of justice, so that’s terrible. But the second place that we’re in is that Americans have awakened to the importance of the rule of law and the danger of its erosion, and that’s a very, very important sort of antibody response. And it’s a source for optimism.”

Left, Richard Quinn and Alicia Corder spoke with host Don Marsh about the FBI’s efforts to diversify its agents on Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis on the Air

While attending Indiana State to become a surgeon, Alicia Corder took a criminal justice class and her entire life plan changed.

“It’s not anything I had considered before,” she said describing a time she heard from an FBI agent about their work. “But there was something about the way he spoke about the people he worked with and the mission he served, and his passion and dedication to it that I was absolutely struck by it. And the next week, I went and changed my major and ended up going to law school and geared everything after that to becoming an agent.”

Missouri Highway Patrol Superintendent Sandra Karsten speaks with interim St. Louis Police Chief Larry O'Toole in July. The Highway Patrol began monitoring St. Louis highways this summer.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

Halfway through a 90-day initiative, the Missouri Highway Patrol has confiscated at least 20 illegal guns and made hundreds of arrests for outstanding warrants on Interstates 55 and 70 in St. Louis.

It’s the first time in modern history the patrol has deployed up to 30 troopers on interstate highways within the city of St. Louis for an extended period of time, Capt. John Hotz said. But watching the highways may be one of the few things state and federal government can do to help St. Louis bring down its crime rate, putting the onus primarily on St. Louis’ officers and citizens.

Saint John's United Church vigil gun violence Kenneth McKoy
FIle photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

President Donald Trump and members of his Cabinet repeatedly have promised to help get violent crime in cities like St. Louis, which is on pace to have 180-plus homicides for the third year in a row, under control.

The administration has promised an additional $200 million to combat the problem, with most of the money targeted to boosting enforcement. Though St. Louis is guaranteed none of that money, the budget is praised by local law enforcement and criticized by those who daily try to fight crime on the ground.

Voices on policing: FBI director's remarks bring calls for data, specific actions

Feb 19, 2015
Former FBI Director James Comey
FBI

On Feb. 12, FBI director James B. Comey spoke at Georgetown University and his words have engendered a lot of comment. While the full text of the speech is available on the FBI website; some key elements follow. Below these bullet points are comments from Richard Rosenfeld of the University of Missouri-St. Louis and Carol Camp Yeakey of Washington University. They responded to a request St.

Former FBI Director Mueller Visits St. Louis

Feb 17, 2015
Former FBI Director Robert S. Mueller III
Used with permission/St. Louis Speakers Series

Robert S. Mueller III became director of the FBI in 2001, just one week before the Sept. 11 attacks. He then had the enormous responsibility of leading the agency through a transformation into the threat-based, intelligence-led organization it is today.

Mueller spoke to St. Louis Public Radio's Katie Cook about the changes the FBI underwent post 9/11, and the many efforts its agents made to better serve the country’s changing needs.

FBI St. Louis

The FBI is hoping a reward of up to $20,000 will help solve the case of a Jefferson County woman who vanished in 2005.  Investigators have also released a new missing person poster showing Amanda Kay Jones in the clothes she was wearing the day she disappeared.

The federal agency is seeking information leading to the location of  Jones, or details about anyone who was involved in the disappearance.

police lights
essygie | Flickr

WSIU's Jennifer Fuller contributed reporting to this story.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation and police at Southern Illinois University-Carbondale are investigating after someone mailed a threat to the university last night.

The threat prompted an safety alert to students, faculty and staff, but SIU-C spokesman Rod Sievers called that a precaution.

(via Flickr/banspy)

A man who federal authorities say is a suspect in at least 10 bank robberies over the last three months has been arrested in a small town in Oklahoma, less than 10 miles from the Arkansas border.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation dubbed Michael Eugene Brewster the "Bucket List Bandit" because he allegedly told bank tellers that he had just months to live. He's thought to have robbed banks in Missouri, Illinois, Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Utah, North Carolina, and Pennsylvania, where his last robbery allegedly occurred on Sept. 10.

(photo provided by the Federal Bureau of Investigation)

Udpated at 2:15 pm Thursday with various corrections.

A Greenville, Ill. native who spent the last four years in the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Critical Incident Response Group is the new special agent in charge of the FBI field office in St. Louis.

The FBI announced the appointment of Dean C. Bryant to the post today. He replaces Dennis Baker, who retired at the end of December.

(photo courtesy of the Federal Bureau of Investigation)

The FBI is looking for a man who robbed the Forest Park Community Credit Union near Saint Louis University today - a robber investigators believe may be responsible for two other robberies last month.

The Bureau says that just before 1 p.m., the robber entered the credit union at 3651 Forest Park Ave., and handed the teller a note demanding cash. The robber did not show or imply that he had a weapon, and left with an undisclosed amount of money.

(courtesy of the Federal Bureau of Investigation)

The Federal Bureau of Investigation is looking into three bank robberies that took place within four hours of each other.

Today's robberies were the third, fourth and fifth of the month, and brings the total for 2012 to 14.

Here are the details:

(via Flickr/davidsonscott15)

A bank robber the Federal Bureau of Investigation has dubbed the "Logo bandit" for his habit of wearing  athletic apparel while committing his crimes has struck again.

The FBI's St. Louis office says the man approached a teller at the Bank of America at 9661 Manchester Rd. around 10:30 a.m. today and presented a demand note to the teller. The robber did not display a gun or indicate that he possessed a weapon.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, March 24, 2011 - Dennis Baker, special agent in charge of the FBI's St. Louis Division, says the law enforcement agency has made many improvements -- notably, better inter-agency communications -- since the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

While more may need to be done, he added, "If we had 19 terrorists coming in the United States and plotting today, they would be caught."

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Oct. 25, 2009 - Roland J. Corvington is doing his third tour of duty in St. Louis.

The first came when he worked in private security after earning a bachelor's degree and a master's degree in law enforcement administration from Western Illinois University in Macomb, Ill.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Sept. 29, 2009 - Before he leaves town for Miami in a couple weeks, local FBI chief John Gillies may have a few more law-enforcement surprises up his sleeve.

"We have ongoing investigations and we'll see where these investigations take us,'' Gillies said today during an interview on the St. Louis public-radio show, "St. Louis On the Air.''