Gateway Cup | St. Louis Public Radio

Gateway Cup

Several cyclists zoom though the Lafayette Square neighborhood during the 2018 edition of The Gateway Cup.
Carrie Zukoski

Hundreds of people will line the streets of several St. Louis neighborhoods this weekend to catch a glimpse of cyclists zipping along the roads at an average speed of 30 miles per hour.

Several racers from around the world are in the city for the Gateway Cup. It's a nationally recognized cycling event that is in its 36th year.

"It's exciting for us to say, 'Wow, we have national champions and Olympians and people who have raced in Europe targeting St. Louis and then coming here and having a great experience,'" said organizer Mike Weiss.

St. Louis resident Megan Vitale and her nine-year-old daughter Sophia, who has cerebral palsy, participated in the Ride to Unite event on September 1, 2018.
Shahla Farzan | St. Louis Public Radio

When Erika Wolf was young, she loved riding her bike.

But when she was 11, she was diagnosed with retinitis pigmentosa — a rare genetic disorder that causes a person to lose their vision over time.

Wolf is now blind, but she hasn’t stopped cycling. This is her second year riding a tandem bike in “Ride to Unite,” an annual event that pairs champion cyclists racing in the Gateway Cup with riders who have disabilities. The goal, say organizers, is to help make cycling a more inclusive sport.

Gateway Cup

Cyclists from across the country gather in St. Louis this weekend for the 29th annual Gateway Cup cycling races. The popular, four-day event takes place in four St. Louis neighborhoods – Lafayette Square, Benton Park, The Hill and St. Louis Hills – and attracts anywhere from 5,000 to 10,000 fans per day.

The Gateway Cup has long been an attraction for top-level cyclists. But this year the race gained additional prestige because it has been added to the U.S.A. Cycling National Criterium Calendar (NCC), the premier series of 20 professional criterium races.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Aug. 4, 2010 - Given that the St. Louis area has the highest number of bicycle-related accidents in Missouri and that St. Charles County is considering banning bicycles on certain highways, how can St. Louis be touted as a great destination for cyclists?