In-home health care | St. Louis Public Radio

In-home health care

Missouri workers providing care for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities make less than a Walmart or Target worker, even after a pay increase that went into effect last month. 

The low pay is the main reason about half of Missouri workers quit each year, according to Missouri Developmental Disabilities Division Director Val Huhn.

Jennifer Ludden | NPR

Controversial changes to Missouri's home health-services program by former Gov. Eric Greitens and the Republican-controlled legislature saved one fourth of the $43 million lawmakers had expected, according a state audit.

The Republican governor and state lawmakers didn’t take rising costs and sicker patients into account, concluded the report from State Auditor Nicole Galloway, a Democrat. 

File photo | Jo Mannies | St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri lawmakers return to Jefferson City next week to begin the second half of the 2018 legislative session.

House Speaker Todd Richardson, R-Poplar Bluff, said his chamber will spend the bulk of their first week back debating the fiscal year 2019 state budget and voting it over to the Senate.

File photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

The Missouri Senate is waiting to go into special session on securing in-home health care benefits for more than 8,000 state residents.

Marshall Griffin | St. Louis Public Radio

Approximately 80 home health care workers demonstrated outside Gov. Jay Nixon's office Wednesday, demanding that he sign off on an agreement that could lead to their getting higher wages.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Home health-care workers in Missouri may be getting a Christmas present from Gov. Jay Nixon, in the form of an administrative rule to implement a pay hike.

But the proposed rule change appears to be a present they want to return or exchange.

Groups that support the workers, including their union representatives, oppose the use of an administrative rule to implement the wage hike because the Republican-led legislature can pass a resolution rejecting the rule. They favor an executive order instead.

(via Flickr/david_shane)

A four-year legal struggle over whether Missouri’s home care workers can unionize is finally over.

The Missouri Supreme Court has chosen to let stand the most recent ruling surrounding the results of a 2010 election, in which a majority of home care workers voted to form a labor union.  A circuit court judge had blocked the state from certifying the election results, but the Court of Appeals for the Western District reversed that decision.  The High Court’s decision to take no further action means that home care workers can begin negotiations on a union contract with the state.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, May 13, 2010 - They prepare the meals, do the bathing and the shopping for about 12,000 poor and disabled Missourians. Many people probably don't give much thought to the services provided by these home-care workers -- until some of them stage a protest over wages or vote to form a union.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: October 20, 2008 - Since she became a quadriplegic after a car accident nearly 18 years ago, Kathy Alexander of Bourbon, Mo., has needed a personal attendant at her home.