James McAnally | St. Louis Public Radio

James McAnally

Gallery-goers mill about near the piece "Blake the Great."  6/20/18
File photo | The Luminary

The Luminary art gallery in St. Louis is losing one of its leaders. 

Brea Youngblood, who co-founded the Cherokee Street gallery, is leaving at the end of the year. 

She and then-husband James McAnally founded the Luminary in 2007 and have run it since then, calling themselves co-caretakers. He will continue as executive director. 

The Luminary gallery on Cherokee Street has raised more than 80 percent of the $500,000 it needs to expand both its building and its reach into the community.

When complete, the enhanced facilities and additional programming will boost the Luminary’s presence as a kid-friendly, neighborhood spot where visitors are invited to drop by — and are not expected to buy anything. Its leaders say that is a much-needed feature on Cherokee Street, a bustling commercial area rife with restaurants and shops.

Sarrita Hunn's Sarrita Hunn, "Art As...Library"  is a number of books attached at thier ends, spine up to the wall, was displayed at an earlier exhibit celebrating Temporary Art Review's fifth anniversary.
Provided by The Luminary

A St. Louis online arts journal that reaches local, national and international readers, is about to celebrate an important milestone.  James McAnally and Sarrita Hunn founded the Temporary Art Review in 2011. To celebrate its fifth anniversary, they’re publishing a limited edition book of writing from the site.  It may sound like esoteric art stuff, but as McAnally told Willis Ryder Arnold, there’s a lot at stake.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Dec. 9, 2013 - If you wanted to take a real-time snapshot of the St. Louis art community, who and what would you feature? The Luminary Center of the Arts focused its attention on the work of four specific local artists in a series called “We Are.”

Review: The Luminary offers unique vantage for viewing St. Louis

Oct 24, 2012

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Oct. 24, 2012 - Is Cherokee the pounding heart or the soul of St. Louis? Is it the clever, turning mind or the third eye gazing at our arch/navel? However you parse it, Cherokee is a vital part of our city anatomy. 

Reflection: A Form of Illumination

Oct 8, 2012

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Oct. 8, 2012 - The FORM Design Show has evolved from a fundraiser to the anchor of the St. Louis Design Week and a community builder, drawing applications from artists all over the country and providing a place for them to display, network and learn from each other. It also is a springboard for an interesting upcoming event. But more about that later.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Sept. 12, 2012 - The Luminary Center for the Arts has announced plans to move forward with its Cherokee Street relocation and expansion.

Beginning next month, renovations of the roof, facade and exterior will begin at The Luminary’s new 2701-7 Cherokee St. location, with plans to open in the spring of 2013. Luminary founders James and Brea McAnally have a lease/purchase agreement for the 13,000 square-feet facility.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Dec. 15, 2011 - The Luminary Center for the Arts is launching a capital campaign for a Cherokee Street project designed to support artists in St. Louis and around the globe.

Owners of The Luminary, a gallery, studio and exhibition space, operating in a leased South St. Louis City building since 2007, want to buy the former Globe Variety Store at 2700 Cherokee St. They plan to transform the 22,500 square foot, three-story space, one block west of the iconic Globe Drug Store, into a permanent arts incubator.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Dec. 15, 2011 - The Luminary Center for the Arts is launching a capital campaign for a Cherokee Street project designed to support artists in St. Louis and around the globe.

Owners of The Luminary, a gallery, studio and exhibition space, operating in a leased South St. Louis City building since 2007, want to buy the former Globe Variety Store at 2700 Cherokee St. They plan to transform the 22,500 square foot, three-story space, one block west of the iconic Globe Drug Store, into a permanent arts incubator.