Jefferson City | St. Louis Public Radio

Jefferson City

Missouri S&T engineering researchers inspect a damaged apartment building in Jefferson City in May 2019.
Eli Chen | St. Louis Public Radio

Among the volunteers and workers moving furniture, broken lumber and fallen trees at Hawthorne Park apartments in Jefferson City last weekend, three engineers with a large remote control watched a drone fly over a building that was missing a chunk of its roof.

A team of engineering professors and students from the Missouri University of Science and Technology began inspecting damages after a violent tornado struck parts of the state capital last Wednesday. For several years, some have been studying ways to design houses in Tornado Alley states like Missouri to withstand extreme weather events.

Missouri S&T engineering professor Grace Yan and her students survey post-tornado damages in Jefferson City in May 2019.
Missouri University of Science & Technology

Engineering researchers from the Missouri University of Science and Technology are spending several days in Jefferson City to study the destruction caused by a tornado that battered the city late Wednesday.

Missouri S&T engineering professor Grace Yan and her graduate students began Thursday to interview residents and capture drone footage of the damages. Her research has focused on designing buildings to become more resistant to tornadoes.

There have been many examples of damages in Jefferson City that are unique to tornadoes, such as roofs being torn off, Yan said.

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

On Friday’s "Behind the Headlines" on St. Louis on the Air, we  took an in-depth look at one of the top news stories of the week.

On this week’s program, St. Louis Public Radio Statehouse Reporter Marshall Griffin joined us to give us an update on the political happenings Missouri State Capitol in Jefferson City. No Missouri budget has yet been passed, but the the General Assembly has been busy passing other bills.

Read more of Marshall's reporting this week here

An aerial view of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency at 3200 South 2nd Street, the current headquarters for NGA West.
NATIONAL GEOSPATIAL-INTELLIGENCE AGENCY

In our weekly "Behind the Headlines" segment, “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh discussed the top news stories that caught St. Louisans’ attention this week, with the people that produced them and contributed to them.

This week, we discussed the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency's pick of north St. Louis as the 'preferred site' for its new facility and the political/economic implications of such a choice. We also discussed the Missouri legislative session and political climate in Jefferson City as well as Senate Bill 5 and Ferguson's new police chief.

Joining us:

Marshall Griffin | St. Louis Public Radio

Not all of the news that you see and hear featured on St. Louis Public Radio comes from the St. Louis region itself—some of it comes from our reporters located in Jefferson City and Washington D.C. That would be Marshall Griffin and Jim Howard, respectively.

On Monday’s “St. Louis on the Air,” the two discussed the year’s biggest news from our nation’s capital and the capital of Missouri. 

Here’s some of what they discussed:

Missouri Authorities Awarded $1.6 M To Redevelop Brownfields

Jul 17, 2013
(via Environmental Protection Agency)

Three Missouri agencies will receive $1.6 million in federal funds to cleanup and redevelop contaminated properties.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced this week that it has selected public authorities in St. Louis, Springfield and Jefferson City, to receive the funding as part of its $15 million supplemental revolving loan funds (RLF).

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

A lawsuit over access to LGBT-related websites at a mid-Missouri public school was heard today in federal court in Jefferson City.

The case involves filtering software used by the Camdenton R-3 school district’s library.  The suit was filed by Parents, Family and Friends of Lesbians and Gays (PFLAG) and is backed by the American Civil Liberties Union.  Tony Rothert, Legal Director of the ACLU of Eastern Missouri, says the Camdenton Schools' library uses filtering software that blocks any mention of sex, not just pornography.

(via Wikimedia Commons/DEMIS Mapserver/Shannon 1)

The massive amount of water flowing south and east along the Missouri River will begin to flood portions of central Missouri this Independence Day holiday weekend.

The Missouri River at Jefferson City is forecast to rise by six feet and reach 29 feet as early as Thursday, just a foot shy of the top of the city's north levee.  Jim Kramper with the National Weather Service office in St. Louis expects the capital city's flood threat to remain at moderate.

Mo. Gov. Nixon evaluated at hospital following car accident

Jan 7, 2011

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has been treated and released from a hospital after being involved in a traffic accident.

The Missouri State Highway Patrol says Nixon was a passenger in a Chevrolet Suburban driven by a patrol trooper that was rear-ended Friday morning in a three-vehicle accident. The crash occurred on U.S. Highway 50 in Jefferson City, just a few blocks south of the Capitol.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Nov. 10, 2009 - Gov. Jay Nixon issued the following statement shortly after 5 p.m. -- “Thankfully, reports this morning of an incident in the Governor’s Office Building in Jefferson City turned out not to be true. I sincerely appreciate the quick response of area law enforcement to this situation. The men and women of the Missouri Highway Patrol, the Capitol Police and the Jefferson City Police Department should be commended for their swift action. As we saw by their quick response this morning, Missourians should have faith that our law enforcement agencies stand ready to protect them and their families in time of need.”