Joe Roddy | St. Louis Public Radio

Joe Roddy

The St. Louis Board of Aldermen gave initial approval to extending an incentive package for an urgent care center.
Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio

Updated Oct. 18 with final passage

The St. Louis Board of Aldermen has approved nearly $8 million in incentives for a three-bed urgent care hospital proposed for the site of the old Pruitt-Igoe housing project in north St. Louis, in the footprint of Paul McKee’s NorthSide Regeneration initiative.

“This is not a big business project for someone to get rich or anything but that,” Alderwoman Tammika Hubbard, D-5th Ward, told her colleagues Friday. “This is to fill a void in our community that we’ve experienced since Homer G. Phillips closed.”

Bill Laskowsky (left) and Darryl Piggee, representatives of the Northside Regeneration urgent care project, show renderings for the proposal.
Kae Petrin | St. Louis Public Radio

An aldermanic committee voted Wednesday to extend deadlines and renew tax incentives for the developers behind Northside Regeneration’s slow-moving urgent care project. 

The vote came after the city's own attorney and its economic development arm pointed out legal and financial concerns.

St. Louis Board of Aldermen President Lewis Reed presides over Friday's session of the Board of Aldermen.
File photo | Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis aldermen gave their stamp of approval Friday for two major public investments in sports-related facilities.

August 2014 St. Louis Metropolitan Police Chief Sam Dotson
File photo | Bill Greenblatt |UPI

The decision by St. Louis Metropolitan Police Chief Sam Dotson to run for mayor without resigning his current post isn’t a very popular one.

Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

The city of St. Louis often uses tax incentives as a means of spurring development. But one alderman wants to change how the tax breaks are given out and assessed.  

Alderman Joe Roddy, D-17th Ward, told members of the Board of Aldermen’s Housing, Urban Development and Zoning Committee on Wednesday that he was forming a group to examine how tax increment financing and tax abatement is done in the city of St. Louis.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, April 3, 2013 - As the Board of Aldermen prepares to resume its hearing into problems and policies at the Missouri History Museum, commissioners of the Zoo-Museum District who have been critical of how the museum spends its money say its tax subsidy should be cut.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, April 3, 2013 - >Both sides in an aldermanic hearing on the Missouri History Museum Wednesday agreed that issues such as a questionable land deal and compensation for departed president Robert Archibald were mistakes that had shaken public confidence in the institution.

But they parted ways on the issue of whether recent changes in governance go far enough to restore taxpayers’ faith in the museum and to guard against such problems occurring in the future.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Both sides in an aldermanic hearing on the Missouri History Museum Wednesday agreed that issues such as a questionable land deal and compensation for departed president Robert Archibald were mistakes that had shaken public confidence in the institution.

But they parted ways on the issue of whether recent changes in governance go far enough to restore taxpayers’ faith in the museum and to guard against such problems occurring in the future.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: As the Board of Aldermen prepares to resume its hearing into problems and policies at the Missouri History Museum, commissioners of the Zoo-Museum District who have been critical of how the museum spends its money say its tax subsidy should be cut.

Alderman Joe Roddy, who heads the aldermanic parks committee, chaired its first session on the museum in January. Wednesday morning, city appointees to the museum’s subdistrict commission are expected to testify about how the issues that have dogged the museum for the past several months can be resolved.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, May 21, 2012 - For decades, the St. Louis circuit clerk was often the city’s most powerful politician.  Joe Roddy and his army of patronage workers were once the muscle who helped get mayors elected, while Freeman Bosley Jr. used the post’s clout to help get elected mayor himself.

All of which makes last week’s action by the Missouri General Assembly all the more stunning. With no floor opposition and no apparent public interest, legislators voted to end the St. Louis circuit clerk’s days as a citywide elected office and turn it into an appointive post. The city’s circuit judges will decide who holds the job.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: August 20, 2008 - Hotel developer Charles Drury and associates gave the public on Tuesday an early glimpse of their still-evolving proposal for two 16-story hotels overlooking Forest Park along Kingshighway, just south of the newly opened Kingshighway and Interstate 64 interchange.

The approximately $100 million hotel project would be the largest in terms of size and expense for Drury Development Corp. since the family-owned business built its first hotel in Cape Girardeau, Mo., in 1969.