Lacy Clay | St. Louis Public Radio

Lacy Clay

President Donald Trump speaks at a Granite City Works warehouse on July 26, 2018.
File photo I Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Members of the Missouri and Illinois congressional delegations are reacting to the escalating threat of impeachment against President Donald Trump along party lines.

At issue is Trump’s request for Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelensky to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden, which was confirmed in a memorandum that the White House released on Wednesday. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced on Tuesday that the Democratic-controlled chamber would launch an impeachment inquiry. 

Trump has denied any impropriety. 

St. Louis faith leaders, elected officials and community leaders gathered at Lane Tabernacle CME Church to address the city's gun violence among children. August 30, 2019
Chad Davis | St. Louis Public Radio

The latest episode of Politically Speaking takes stock of how political and community leaders are responding to the killings of St. Louis children in an outbreak of gun violence this summer.

St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum, Julie O’Donoghue, Rachel Lippmann, Chad Davis and Andrea Henderson look into how city and state leaders are feeling the pressure to act — especially when it comes to implementing more stringent gun laws.

St. Louis faith leaders, elected officials and community leaders gathered at Lane Tabernacle CME Church to address the city's gun violence among children. August 30, 2019
Chad Davis | St. Louis Public Radio

Two days after Gov. Mike Parson rejected calls for a special session to address gun violence, elected officials, faith leaders and doctors in St. Louis asked him to reconsider. 

On Friday, more than two dozen St. Louis leaders urged Parson to seek a special session so lawmakers could pass legislation allowing municipalities to enact their own gun regulations. That's unlikely, given that a state law bars cities from passing local gun control laws.

They also called for an emergency meeting between local elected officials and community leaders before the Legislature meets in September to consider overriding Parson’s vetoes of bills that state lawmakers passed in the regular session.

U.S. Rep. Lacy Clay, D-University City, speaks before a crowd of about 500 at a town hall meeting about gun violence on Aug. 28, 2019.
Andrea Henderson | St. Louis Public Radio

More than a dozen children have died from gun violence in St. Louis this year. The deaths were at the heart of a town hall meeting at Harris-Stowe State University on Wednesday night.

The Board of Aldermen's black caucus and U.S. Rep. Lacy Clay, D-University City, called for immediate action from the federal level to combat gun violence against children. 

“Gun violence is a public health emergency,” Clay said. 

Missouri Gov. Mike Parson at a press conference on government restructuring on Aug. 28, 2019.
Jaclyn Driscoll | St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri Gov. Mike Parson reiterated Wednesday there will be no special legislative session on gun violence. 

Parson called a special session to resolve a car sales tax issue to run concurrently with the state’s annual veto session. It’s set to begin on Sept. 9 and will cost taxpayers an estimated $16,000. 

U.S. Reps. Lacy Clay, D-University City, and Ro Khanna, D-Calif.
Nick Telep I St. Louis Public Radio / St. Louis Public Radio

Federal law enforcement officers would have less latitude to use deadly force under a bill U.S. Rep. Lacy Clay plans to introduce. 

Clay, D-University City, wants to raise the threshold for when it is acceptable for federal officers to kill a person in confrontations. He said that other tactics — such as de-escalation strategies — should be employed first, and that deadly force should only be used as a last resort.

U.S. Capitol
Liam James Doyle | NPR

St. Louis-area members of Congress said they are ready to act to prevent mass shootings like the ones that took place in El Paso and Dayton over the last weekend — though it’s sometimes unclear what exactly they are looking to do.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, March 4, 2012 - As U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill sees it, she was siding with workers – not employers — with her vote last week against U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt’s proposal to allow employers to bar insurance coverage for certain medical procedures or services that the employer objects to, on ethical or religious grounds.

“I don’t think the boss should be able to decide what health care you get,’’ McCaskill said in an interview Saturday with the Beacon.

U.S. Rep. Lacy Clay announced Friday he has introduced a bill aimed at allowing cities to create their own gun laws. Missouri is one of many states with state laws banning local governments from regulating guns. June 28 2019
Nicolas Telep / St. Louis Public Radio

U.S. Rep. Lacy Clay wants to end state laws that stop cities from regulating guns.

The bill the University City Democrat introduced earlier this week would withhold Department of Justice grant money from states that have laws prohibiting local governments from passing their own gun laws. Missouri passed such a law in 2014.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Aug. 7, 2009 - As the debate over health care heats up, the Beacon asked area members of the House and Senate where they stand at this time. Specifically, the Beacon asked:

U.S. Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson discusses the St. Louis Opportunity Zones with St. Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson and Missouri Gov. Mike Parson.
Chad Davis | St. Louis Public Radio

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson on Friday met with Missouri Gov. Mike Parson, St. Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson, U.S. Rep. Lacy Clay, D-University City, and other state and city leaders in St. Louis to tour new real estate developments in low-income communities.

Carson came to St. Louis to highlight Opportunity Zones, a federal program that encourages investment in neglected communities by offering incentives to developers, including tax breaks. The program was established as part of the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.

U.S. Rep. William Lacy Clay, D-University City, speaks at a congressional forum hosted by the League of Women Voters at Christ Church Cathedral in July of 2016.
File photo I Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

As a member of the House Committee on Oversight and Reform, St. Louis Congressman Lacy Clay had a prominent place in the nationally televised hearings of Michael Cohen.

President Donald Trump’s former lawyer spent most of Wednesday making a series of accusations against his former boss. And the issue the University City Democrat zeroed in on were claims that Trump inflated his net worth numerous times — including on loan documents as part of his effort to try to buy a professional football team.

Just two months ago, Missouri voters approved a constitutional amendment to change how the state draws legislative boundaries. The state's lawmakers, who return to session this week, aren't having it and may seek to nix or rewrite the anti-gerrymandering law.

Missouri was one of four states where voters last year decided to make significant changes to the redistricting process in the name of curbing partisanship and reducing political influence on legislative and congressional maps.

Rep. Clem Smith, D-Velda Village Hills
File photo | Tim Bommel I House Communications

State Rep. Clem Smith was willing to step away from Missouri politics after being barred from running again for the House due to term limits.

In one of his final speeches, Smith said he was “going to ride out into the sunset like Shane and get an AARP card so I can get discounts at Best Western or something.” But the four-term state lawmaker from St. Louis County kept getting encouragement to stay involved, which is one of the reasons he ran for and won the vice chairmanship of the Missouri Democratic Party last weekend.

Democratic U.S. Rep. Lacy Clay talks with supporters Tuesday night at a Pasta House restaurant in University City. Clay easily defeated his 1st District Republican challenger Robert Vroman.
File photo I David Kovaluk I St. Louis Public Radio

It’s fair to say this past election cycle was bad for Missouri Democrats.

U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill lost re-election. Democrats made no gains in either the Missouri House or Senate. And the party’s dismal showing in rural Missouri doesn’t bode well for future contests.

Election night felt different, though, for Congressman Lacy Clay. Not only was the St. Louis Democrat celebrating another term in the U.S. House, but his party is poised to take control of Congress’ lower chamber — giving the veteran University City Democrat more power and responsibility.

Missouri Board of Education member Mike Jones
Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio

Veteran Democrat Mike Jones – who has played significant roles in St. Louis and St. Louis County government – joins Politically Speaking to offer his take on how best for Democrats to regroup after their generally poor showing in the November elections.

Jones also talks policy, particularly in his current role as a member of the state Board of Education.

Both the governor and Legislature in Missouri are in charge of the congressional redistricting process. But they're directly involved in approving state legislative maps.
File photo I Carolina Hidalgo I St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies take a deep look at Amendment 1 on the latest edition of Political Speaking.

The measure, widely known as Clean Missouri, combines a host of ethics-related alterations with an overhaul of state legislative redistricting. Out of all the things on the Nov. 6 ballot, Clean Missouri is eliciting the most unusual political alliances.

Members of the Missouri House of Representatives throw their papers in the air to mark the end of the legislative session on Friday in Jefferson City.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Out of all the items on the Nov. 6 ballot, Clean Missouri is creating some of the most unusual partners in recent Missouri political history.

Proponents of the measure, on the ballot as Amendment 1, include left-of-center activists who helped write and fund the initiative, as well as some current and former GOP officials. Clean Missouri backers believe that the amendment will make lawmakers more responsive to people instead of special interest groups or lobbyists.

Senator Claire McCaskill speaks at Lona's Lil Eats in St. Louis on Aug. 30, 2018.
File photo I Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

As she battles for a possible third term, U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill appears to be embracing her reputation as a dogged competitor who can give as good as she gets.

And she gives some of the credit to her mother, Betty McCaskill, who was the first woman elected to the Columbia City Council.

After Claire McCaskill lost the governor's race in 2004, she said her mother advised her to ignore the old Democratic state adage of focusing primarily on St. Louis, Kansas City and their suburbs in order to get elected.

U.S. Rep. Lacy Clay, D-University City, (center) and Missouri Democratic lawmakers gathered in the Delmar Loop on October 15, 2018 to demand that Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley drop his appeal of a challenge to the state's voter photo ID law.
Wiley Price | St. Louis American

St. Louis area Democrats are using an appeal of a court ruling against Missouri’s voter photo identification law as a rallying cry in the state’s competitive race for U.S. Senate.

U.S. Rep. Lacy Clay, D-University City, joined Democratic members of the Missouri General Assembly Monday to demand that Attorney General Josh Hawley drop his defense of the law. A Cole County judge last week declared unconstitutional the sworn statement voters who used non-photo identification like a utility bill had to sign to cast a ballot.

Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley addresses the crowd in Springfield, Missouri, after winning the GOP primary for U.S. Senate on August 7, 2018. He will take on Claire McCaskill in November.
Jennifer Moore | KSMU

GOP Attorney General Josh Hawley and U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill easily won their respective Missouri primaries on Tuesday, setting up a Senate showdown in November that will gain national attention.

And voters in St. Louis-area congressional districts decided to keep U.S. Rep. Lacy Clay in office — and selected Cort VanOstran to square off against GOP Congresswoman Ann Wagner.

Hawley ended up defeating 10 other candidates in the Republican primary for the U.S. Senate. He’ll face McCaskill, a two-term senator who easily won her primary against six opponents.

U.S. Rep. Lacy Clay is seeking to serve a 10th term in the House of Representatives.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, U.S. Rep. Lacy Clay (D-University City) joined host Don Marsh to discuss his campaign to serve another term in Congress. St. Louis Public Radio political reporter Jason Rosenbaum also participated in the conversation.

Clay, who was first elected to national office in 2000, currently faces a primary challenge from Cori Bush to represent Missouri’s 1st Congressional District. Both Bush and Clay’s names will appear on next week’s Democratic primary ballot.

Clay fielded a wide variety of questions from Marsh, Rosenbaum and listeners during the show. Here are 10 of those exchanges.

Lacy Clay, left, and Cori Bush, right, face each other in an Aug. 7 Democratic primary for Missouri's 1st Congressional District.
File photos | Carolina Hidalgo and Kelly Moffitt I St. Louis Public Radio

Congressman Lacy Clay may be the Missouri equivalent of professional-wrestling great Mr. Perfect.

That’s because the St. Louis Democrat has never lost an election for the Missouri Legislature or Congress. In fact, his father, former Congressman Bill Clay, won every aldermanic and congressional race during his long tenure in public service. Many attribute this electoral success to a stout political organization — and decades of loyalty.

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Cori Bush prepare to take a photo on Saturday, July 21, 2018, at Sqwires Restaurant in St. Louis.
Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio

A Democrat challenging incumbent Congressman Lacy Clay is getting a boost from Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, who made national headlines earlier this year by toppling a long-time New York representative.

Ocasio-Cortez was in St. Louis on Saturday on behalf of Florissant Democrat Cori Bush. Her visit comes a day after Ocasio-Cortez joined Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders in campaigning for Brent Welder, a former St. Louis resident is who running for a congressional seat in Kansas.

Attorney General Josh Hawley shakes hands on Thursday with Vice President Mike Pence. Pence made a speech in downtown St. Louis to bolster President Donald Trump's policies.
Bill Greenblatt I UPI

This week’s election edition of Politically Speaking examines how national and state-based political figures are assisting Attorney General Josh Hawley and U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill’s campaigns.

Hawley received a fundraising boost this week from Vice President Mike Pence, who swung through the St. Louis area on Thursday to promote President Donald Trump’s policies. Meanwhile across the state, House Democrats are trying to a link a 2017 controversy involving Senate President Ron Richard with Hawley.

DACA activists rally outside an event organized by U.S. Rep. Lacy Clay at Saint Louis University. Nov. 10, 2017
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

U.S. Rep. Lacy Clay said Friday that he won’t support the year-end spending bill necessary to keep the government running unless it includes provisions to protect undocumented immigrants brought to the United States as children from deportation.

The remarks came at a Saint Louis University forum organized by Clay to discuss the end of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, which gave 800,000 young immigrants work permits and relief from deportation over the last five years.

U.S. Rep. William Lacy Clay, D-University City, speaks at a congressional forum hosted by the League of Women Voters at Christ Church Cathedral in July of 2016.
File photo I Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Places that were crucial to the civil rights movement in the mid-20th century are starting to deteriorate, U.S. Rep. Lacy Clay says, which is one of the main reasons why he’s pushing to preserve them.

Clay’s other angle: He has Republican support, including U.S. Rep. Jason Smith of Salem, Mo. The two are co-sponsors of a bill that passed the U.S. House on Wednesday that would establish the African-American Civil Rights Network.

The Urban League of Metropolitan St. Louis is the largest local branch of any other Urban League in the country.
Jenny Simeone | St. Louis Public Radio

When Sheila Beckham’s house was leaking heat last winter, she thought back to when her great-grandfather repaired his home.

“I remembered that the Urban League came and fixed his doors and the windows, and they were still in the same place, so I figured they could help me too,” said Beckham, a lifelong St. Louis resident. “They came to my house and helped me with my windows and doors too, got me a water heater and a furnace.”

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Feb. 21, 2013 - WASHINGTON – U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill – who campaigned for reelection partly on her centrist ranking for 2011 Senate votes – was somewhat more liberal in her voting last year, according to a National Journal analysis.

The ratings place McCaskill, D-Mo., as the 43rd most liberal senator and the 57th most conservative, with a “composite” liberal score of 62.5 and a conservative score of 37.5.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Jan. 15, 2013 - WASHINGTON – In the new Congress, U.S Rep. William Lacy Clay has been named the top Democrat on a revamped financial services panel with jurisdiction that includes the Federal Reserve Bank, the Export-Import Bank and the World Bank.

Clay, D-St. Louis, served in the previous Congress as the ranking Democrat on a less expansive subcommittee with oversight over the Fed and domestic monetary policy. But the new panel – the Subcommittee on Domestic & International Monetary Policy and Technology – adds oversight of major international monetary organizations.

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