Lawsuit | St. Louis Public Radio

Lawsuit

Three veterans filed suit in Illinois' Third Judicial Circuit against Purdue Pharma and more than a dozen pharmaceutical companies, alleging they marketed dangerous painkilling drugs to vets.
David Kovaluk, Brian Heffernan | St. Louis Public Radio

For years after he got out of the Navy, Joel Bishop took morphine twice a day.

He used four or five Percocet in between those doses.

“I lived around that pill bottle. It’s the only reason I had a watch,” Bishop said. “I couldn’t wait until it was time to open that bottle.”

On Friday, Bishop and two other veterans filed suit in Illinois’ Third Judicial Circuit, which includes Madison and Bond counties, against Purdue Pharma and more than a dozen other pharmaceutical companies, alleging they marketed dangerous painkilling drugs to vets.

St. Louis police arrest a protester in September, 2017.
File Photo |Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Two protesters testified on Monday that they did not receive a warning before St. Louis police deployed pepper spray on them on Sept. 15.

The American Civil Liberty Union of Missouri claims that police officers violated the constitutional rights of protesters following St. Louis Circuit Judge Timothy Wilson's Sept. 15 decision to find former police officer Jason Stockley not guilty in the 2011 murder of Anthony Lamar Smith.

The ACLU has asked U.S. District Judge Catherine Perry to order police to limit when officers can give dispersal warnings or use chemical agents.

"Right now in St. Louis, pepper spray is the new fire hose," Tony Rothert, legal director of the ACLU of Missouri, said during his closing argument.

File photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Three St. Louis police officers told a federal judge on Thursday that the police response to protesters in St. Louis on Sept. 17 was handled lawfully under police policies.

Their testimony came on the second day of hearings on a lawsuit filed by the ACLU of Missouri. The suit alleged that officers violated the constitutional rights of protesters when they used chemical agents and arrested protesters and bystanders without warning.

Sgt. Brian Rossomano told U.S. District Judge Catherine Perry that police ordered the crowd to to disperse. But ACLU officials say St. Louis police officers are allowed too much discretion when responding to the protesters.

State police block protesters from continuing down Brentwood Blvd. toward Interstate 64 on Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017 during a march in Richmond Heights.
Ryan Delaney | St. Louis Public Radio

In the weeks since a judge found former St. Louis police officer Jason Stockley not guilty of first-degree murder in the death of Anthony Lamar Smith, protesters have taken to the streets nearly every night.

While most of the people involved acted peacefully, in several incidents police have arrested demonstrators, and in some cases used tactics that are coming under scrutiny for their legality.

As a result, the city of St. Louis and the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department are the targets of several lawsuits.

State court rejects request by Wilson grand juror to speak about the process.

Dec 15, 2016
St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney Robert McCulloch announces on Nov 24, 2014, that the grand jury declined to indict Darren Wilson on any of five counts that were presented to it.
File photo | Bill Greenblatt | UPI

This story has been updated to reflect events since it was initially published. A member of the grand jury that decided not to charge former Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson in the August 2014 death of Michael Brown will not be able to share information about that experience.

A St. Louis County judge dismissed the grand juror’s suit on Tuesday. Judge Ellen Ribaudo wrote that the juror had not shown why the state laws around grand jury secrecy should not apply in his or her case. And while prosecutor Bob McCulloch chose to make some evidence from the grand jury public, Ribaudo said, not every detail needed to be released.

A forest in Gray Summit, Missouri.
Great Rivers Environmental Law Center

A group of Franklin County residents has appealed a county decision to allow a concrete plant to be built near the Shaw Nature Reserve. 

Three years ago, Kirkwood-based concrete company Landvatter Ready Mix applied for a conditional use permit to build its third concrete facility in the state. After the Franklin County Board of Adjustment approved the permit, residents sued county officials, hoping to overturn the decision. Months later, the company withdrew its permit application and asked the county to rezone the land parcel for commercial use. The county's Planning and Zoning Commission granted its request last September.

An image of the Rush Island Power Plant in an article about its use of the Powder River Basin coal.
Rush Island Energy Center, Ameren Corp.

Updated Aug. 22 with details from the trial — An Environmental Protection Agency lawsuit alleging that Ameren Missouri violated the Clean Air Act goes to trial today in U.S. District Court.

The EPA filed suit against the utility five years ago. Officials with the federal agency allege that, in 2007 and 2010, Ameren illegally installed boiler equipment at two units of its Rush Island Power Plant in Jefferson County without required permits. Under the Clean Air Act, such modifications are considered new sources of air pollution, which are subject to stricter emissions limits.

Provided by Bi-State Development Agency

Updated Friday, July 22 at 5:07p.m. with statement from Ameren Missouri — Ameren Missouri and the Sierra Club reached a $2 million settlement Thursday in U.S. District Court over the utility company's alleged violations of the Clean Air Act.

(via Wikimedia Commons/Noahudlis)

A motion for judgment has been filed in a lawsuit accusing the state of violating Sunshine Laws for refusing to provide information related to Missouri executions.

The filing seeks to expedite a lawsuit filed earlier this year by stating there is no dispute in the core facts of the case, which calls on the court to order the Department of Corrections to release details about the drugs used in lethal injections. It also seeks to identify the pharmacies and laboratories that create and test the drugs.

Mo. Dept. of Public Safety

An instructor with the Missouri State Highway Patrol’s training academy has filed a lawsuit accusing the law enforcement agency of violating its pay plan.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri Lt. Governor Peter Kinder (R) and GOP legislative leaders have filed a lawsuit against Secretary of State Robin Carnahan (D) over the language used in a ballot initiative regarding health care exchanges.

The language approved by Carnahan asks if the law should be amended to, “deny individuals, families, and small businesses the ability to access affordable health care plans through a state-based health benefit exchange unless authorized by statute, initiative or referendum.”  Kinder says the language skews the ballot question’s true purpose, to bar the governor from creating an exchange by executive order.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, May 21, 2012 - In a solemn voice, Archbishop Robert J. Carlson announced Monday afternoon that the St. Louis Archdiocese and Catholic Charities of St. Louis had jointly filed a law suit challenging the constitutionality of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services mandate on contraceptive coverage under the Affordable Care Act.

s_falkow | Flickr

The Illinois Supreme Court has ruled in favor of the family of Annette Simpkins of Granite City, Ill., returning her case to the Madison County circuit court for a trial.

Twelve former employees of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch have sued the paper, saying corporate officials lied to them about the benefits the employees would receive after taking an early retirement offer in 2007.

(via Flickr/steakpinball)

A former anorexia patient is suing a Missouri treatment center, claiming one of its psychologists implanted horrific memories while she was hypnotized so that she'd extend her stay and run up a huge bill.

Lisa Nasseff accuses Castlewood Treatment Center psychologist Mark Schwartz of making her believe she had been part of a satanic cult that committed unthinkable acts and that she had been raped several times and had multiple personalities.

Mo. judge weighing budget cuts by Gov. Nixon

Oct 31, 2011
(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

A Missouri judge is considering whether Gov. Jay Nixon exceeded his constitutional powers when he cut spending for education to help cover costs from the deadly Joplin tornado and major flooding.

Cole County Judge Jon Beetem issued no immediate ruling Monday after listening to arguments from attorneys representing the Democratic governor and Republican Auditor Tom Schweich, who sued.

Monsanto and DuPont back in court over corn patents

Oct 19, 2011
(via Flickr/Dodo-Bird)

DuPont’s Pioneer Hi-Bred International is suing Monsanto for allegedly violating DuPont patents related to corn seed production.

In a lawsuit filed Tuesday in federal court, the Iowa-based seed company accuses Monsanto of using a patented technique developed by DuPont to enhance corn seed germination. The technique involves defoliating the corn plants with herbicides between pollination and harvest.

DuPont alleges that Monsanto has been using this defoliation technique at its research site in Constantine, Michigan.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

Missouri auditor Tom Schweich has sued Gov. Jay Nixon over $170 million in funds the governor withheld from the 2012 budget to pay for disaster relief.

An audit released by Schweich's office last week was sharply critical of the withholds. The suit filed today is based on many of the audit's findings, including:

Hearing set on Kinder's health care lawsuit

Aug 23, 2011
(St. Louis Public Radio)

A federal appeals court will hear arguments this fall on a lawsuit by Missouri Lt. Gov. Peter Kinder challenging the new federal health care law.

Kinder filed suit as a private individual challenging the federal law on several points. A federal judge dismissed the lawsuit in April, ruling that Kinder did not have legal standing to bring many of the claims and that others were not ripe for judicial review.

Update: Man to get $6.33 million in priest-abuse case

Aug 10, 2011
(via Wikimedia Commons/AlexiusHoratius)

In an update to a story we've been following and told you more about earlier this morning:

A nine-year legal fight by a man sexually abused by a priest in the 1970s is over, now that a southern Illinois diocese and its insurer have handed over $6.3 million to resolve a jury award in the man's favor.

(via Wikimedia Commons/AlexiusHoratius)

An attorney for a man sexually abused by a southwestern Illinois priest says his client soon will receive $6.3 million related to a lawsuit the man won against the Diocese of Belleville.

Mike Weilmuenster tells the Belleville News-Democrat that a court hearing Wednesday in St. Clair County could involve the payout to James Wisniewski of Champaign.

Flickr | smcg2011

Missouri's Supreme Court has rejected one of several legal challenges to a series of trash districts in St. Louis County.

Suit challenges Mo. voter photo ID

Jul 7, 2011
(via Flickr/jimbowen0306)

A lawsuit is seeking to strike down a proposed constitutional amendment allowing a photo identification mandate for Missouri voters.

The measure passed the Missouri General Assembly this session and is scheduled to go before voters in November 2012.

It would ask voters to amend the state Constitution and allow lawmakers to enact early voting laws and photo ID requirements.

(Ted Heisel/Missouri Coalition for the Environment)

The board of the Metropolitan Sewer District has approved a settlement with the federal government and a local environmental action group over violations of the Clean Water Act.

The state of Missouri was also a party to the 2007 lawsuit, but did not approve the settlement.

The agreement will, among other things, require MSD to:

(via Flickr/CarbonNYC)

The state of Missouri will receive nearly $1 million from a nationwide settlement over poorly manufactured drugs.

A spokeswoman for Attorney General Chris Koster says the state will return the money to a fund that funds consumer protections lawsuits.

(via Flickr/Paul Sableman)

The Board of Trustees for the Metropolitan Sewer District gave its initial approval last night to a multi-billion dollar plan to settle a Clean War Act lawsuit.

The state of Missouri and the EPA filed the suit in 2007, which the Missouri Coalition for the Environment later joined. It alleged, among other things that

Illinois jury awards $95M for sexual harassment

Jun 9, 2011
(via Flickr/steakpinball)

A federal jury has awarded a woman $95 million in a sexual harassment lawsuit against an Illinois rent-to-own business in suburban St. Louis.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported on its website Thursday that the award against Aaron's Inc. includes $15 million in compensatory damages and $80 million in punitive damages.

(via Flickr/pasa47)

Updated at 8:30 a.m. May 19 with corrected timeline and statement from defendants.

A nearly decade-long legal battle over the redevelopment of the Old Post Office in downtown St. Louis is over.

The parties in a malicious prosecution lawsuit reached a settlement Tuesday.

The redevelopment plan involved the demolition of the Century Building to build a parking garage that would serve the Old Post Office, which was converted into office space.

Here's a brief timeline of the case:

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Missouri Senator Claire McCaskill says that while she sympathizes with southeast Missouri farmers whose land has been swamped by the Birds Point levee breach, a lawsuit filed on their behalf against the federal government will be difficult to win.

The lawsuit claims the government violated the farmers' rights by taking their land without adequate compensation.

Philip Morris USA, others win favorable verdict from St. Louis jury

Apr 29, 2011
(via Flickr/seannaber)

Philip Morris USA and other major tobacco companies won a favorable verdict Friday in a lawsuit filed by 37 Missouri hospitals seeking more than $455 million for treating sick smokers.

Philip Morris USA was one of six tobacco companies involved in the lawsuit.

The hospitals had claimed cigarette companies delivered an "unreasonably dangerous" product and were seeking reimbursement back to 1993 for treating patients who had no insurance and did not pay their bills.

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