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Liquor

Visitors to North Main Street in St. Charles start to head home after bars close on a Friday night in early August. The street has seen smaller crowds on weekends recently, and bar owners say a new liquor ordinance isn't helping. (Aug. 2 2019)
File Photo | Nicolas Telep | St. Louis Public Radio

The St. Charles City Council passed a law Tuesday night that creates a Liquor License Appeals Board and modifies the punitive point system for bars and restaurants. 

Before, penalized owners would appeal to the same commission that issued them the points. Mayor Dan Borgmeyer said that was unfair.

Now, both the commission and the board will each have five members, including restaurant and business owners from North Main Street. 

Bars and restaurants on North Main Street in St. Charles are operating under new rules after the city passed a new liquor ordinance last year. Bar owners say it is unfair for the city to target businesses in the small area. January 25, 2019
Nicolas Telep | St. Louis Public Radio

Just months after a new liquor law put into place stricter rules for bars and restaurants on North Main Street in St. Charles, some owners want the law changed or repealed.

The city council passed the new liquor law in September 2018, and the rules went into effect Jan. 1. Part of the law only affects establishments on the three blocks of North Main Street between Clark and Jefferson streets.

Curtis Wilcoxen, a manager for Lloyd and Harry's Bar and Grill speaks to city council members about his oposition to the bill.
Chad Davis | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Charles business owners will now have to abide by new liquor laws.

The St. Charles City Council voted Tuesday night on a liquor ordinance for the city after months of debate and controversy. The law will establish several standards :

St. Charles Mayor Sally Faith and St. Charles Police Chief Randy McKinley listen to bar manager Curtis Wilcoxen propose alternative solutions to an ordinance that would require many Main Street St. Charles bars to stop selling alcohol by 11 p.m. 6/26/18
Chad Davis | St. Louis Public Radio

Owners from Main Street St. Charles restaurants and bars met with city officials Tuesday to propose alternatives to a bill that would ban the sale of alcohol at most bars after 11 p.m.

The proposals included a possible new tax on liquor sales, new parking fees after 9 p.m. and more parking security to reduce crimes on Main Street. Others suggested that bars on Main Street should have to earn at least 60 percent of its revenue from food sales and no more than 40 percent of its revenue from alcohol.

The pilot program only covers the City of East St. Louis, not unincorporated areas.
Heather Anne Campbell | Flickr

A pilot program between East St. Louis and the state of Illinois is expected to streamline the inspection process for more than 50 retailers in the city who hold liquor licenses. The Illinois Liquor Control Commission is training local officials to make sure the businesses are following state and local laws.

The St. Louis Brewers Heritage Foundation says almost 60 breweries are operating or planning to launch in the St. Louis area.
Veronique LaCapra | St. Louis Public Radio

A federal appellate court has upheld a Missouri Prohibition-era law that requires residency for alcohol wholesalers.

Miami-based South Wine & Spirits challenged the law arguing it amounted to economic protectionism by the state.

Missouri has a three-tiered system that requires wholesalers based in the state serve as the distributors from those that make beer and alcohol to the retailers that sell it.

(via Flickr/Mooganic)

Governor Jay Nixon (D) Wednesday signed eight bills into law that were passed this year by Missouri lawmakers.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri's legislative session has ended, with several issues resolved and several more that came up just short.  St. Louis Public Radio's Marshall Griffin takes a closer look at the final day, and at what happens now:

A few that didn't make it, and a few that did

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, May 15, 2013 - The Missouri Senate could determine the fate of three of the biggest legislative issues looming during this session’s final week: liquor, highway bonds and an early childhood program known as First Steps.

And right before 1 a.m. Wednesday, the Senate quickly dispatched a fourth major bill -- SB1, which changes the state's financially troubled Second Injury Fund -- by approving the bill, 33-1. The House now needs to approve the Senate changes for it to go to the desk of Gov. Jay Nixon.

(via Flickr/Mooganic)

Legislation to redefine the relationship between liquor distributors, wholesalers and retailers has stalled in the Missouri Senate.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

The final week of Missouri's regular legislative session has arrived.  The Republican-led General Assembly and Democratic Governor Jay Nixon are pushing to get several things accomplished before Friday.  St. Louis Public Radio's Marshall Griffin tells us that the session, so far, has been one highlighted by partisanship and controversy.

Nixon vs. lawmakers, tax credit reform

Court rules Ill. public works plan is legal

Jul 11, 2011
(via Flickr/lilhelen)

The Illinois Supreme Court has upheld a law that created a $31 billion statewide construction program.

It unanimously rejected arguments that lawmakers improperly mixed together different issues in a single piece of legislation.

The court on Monday said all parts of the law had "a natural and logical connection" to the public works program.

(via Flickr/steakpinball)

In November 2010, James Allen Morgan, a former St. Louis city liquor control officer, plead guilty to bribery charges. Today, Morgan found out just how he'll be punished.

According to a Department of Justice press release, Morgan received the following sentence:

  • Five months in prison
  • Five months home confinement
  • Two years of supervised release

And what was Morgan's crime?

Ill. court throws out liquor taxes, video gambling

Jan 26, 2011

Reporting from Sean Crawford, Illinois Public Radio also used in this report.

An Illinois appellate court has thrown out legalized video gambling and higher taxes on liquor and candy that were supposed to fund a $31 billion state construction plan.

The court ruled the 2009 law violated the state Constitution's prohibition on bills that deal with more than one subject.

Lure nightclub liquor permit pulled by judge

Jan 25, 2011

A story we've been telling you about for some time about a downtown nightclub has developed even further today.

According to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, a judge ruled to revoke the liquor permit for Lure, now known as Amnesia, effectively closing the nightclub.