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Local Business

Dellwood Mayor Reggie Jones says though Ferguson is getting more attention, his city suffered more damage in Monday's riots, and he wants to make sure it gets the resources to rebuild that it needs. Nov. 28, 2014 file photo.
File photo | St. Louis Public Radio

Nov. 24 marks five years since the grand jury decision not to indict Darren Wilson, the Ferguson police officer responsible for the fatal shooting of Michael Brown. Ferguson received a lot of attention during and after the unrest, but the town of Dellwood also experienced upheaval. 

After the grand jury decision, five of Dellwood’s stores were looted and 13 businesses were set on fire. 

“It was a very traumatic event emotionally to our community, but I’m just glad we have rebounded from that,” said Dellwood Mayor Reggie Jones on Monday’s St. Louis on the Air

Sarah Schlafly, co-founder of Mighty Cricket, measures cricket powder on March 14, 2019 for a batch of dark cocoa oatmeal at Urban Eats Cafe.
Shahla Farzan | St. Louis Public Radio

According to projections by the United Nations, our current food system won’t adequately sustain the 9 billion people expected to be living on Earth by 2050. Protein, the most resource-intensive ingredient in food, will be especially hard to produce.

St. Louis resident Sarah Schlafly is keenly aware of that fact. That’s why she started Mighty Cricket, a startup that produces food products including powdered, roasted crickets.

Crickets are a protein source comparable to animal protein. They can also be farmed in small spaces within an urban setting. Schlafly predicts that this food source will become quite affordable roughly 30 years from now, right around when animal protein will likely be more expensive and harder to come by.

St. Louis-based Hoy Shoe Company manufactures 97% of its sandals in China. If new tariffs go into effect, President Scott Downs says the company would have no choice but to raise prices.
Helen | Flickr

President Donald Trump’s proposed 25% tariff on an additional $300 billion worth of Chinese goods will have a big impact on the footwear industry, which relies on the country for a majority of its products.

Such tariffs would hit home in St. Louis, where shoe manufacturing and sales have a long history. Caleres, formerly Brown Shoe Company, is based in Clayton, and many smaller independent companies call the region home.

Jas Thomas of Girls With Goals (left) is the lead organizer of Saturday's Black Business Expo in St. Louis.
Jas Thomas | Girls With Goals

A St. Louis woman saw a need: Black business owners struggling to connect with potential customers. So, she decided to do something about it. Jas Thomas and her organization, Girls With Goals, established the Black Business Expo, which is being held Saturday at Legacy Cafe in St. Louis.

Thomas says the goal of the event is to promote local black-owned businesses among consumers who might not be aware of them.

The Lincoln-Douglas Square in Alton commemorates one of the city's claims to fame. It also welcomes visitors to the town of almost 27,000 people. March 21, 2018.
Kae Petrin | St. Louis Public Radio

When Lauren Pattan and James Rogalsky started looking for a building to house their brewery, they didn’t plan to move from St. Louis to Alton, where they’d both grown up. But they found the perfect building on Landmark Boulevard, right near the riverfront and off Alton’s old Antiques Row on East Broadway, and it swayed them.

The downtown stretch of Broadway, Rogalsky said, had been “neglected for the last several decades.” But in the last few years, new businesses have opened on the street. Established food staples moved from the city’s traditional main street to Broadway. A tattoo parlor opened at the same intersection as beauty and art supply shops, and a self-serve craft beer bar cropped up.

Sofi Seck (left) and Rosebell Komugisha (right) talk about their mission to help expand educational opportunities for women in sub-Saharan Africa.
Lara Hamdan | St. Louis Public Radio

Eight years ago, photographer Sofi Seck and teacher Rosebell Komugisha, met and became friends in St. Louis. This year, the two reconnected and, after a six-hour brunch, came up with Expedition Subsahara, a company that aims to empower women in Africa.

Genevieve Barlow (left) and Jeff Stevens (right) talk about their craft beer company that only brews non-alcoholic beer.
Lara Hamdan | St. Louis Public Radio

A new craft beer is joining the local market to cater to those who enjoy beer but want to train for a triathlon, attend their job’s Taco Tuesday or party Friday night and wake up without a hangover.

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked about Wellbeing Brewing Company, a local craft beer company that brews non-alcoholic beer.

Katelyn Petrin | St. Louis Public Radio intern

When Star Clipper closed this March, some people cried, others Tweeted their frustration. In its 26 years in business, the store had become a beloved cultural center, event space and small press distributor for lovers of comics, graphic novels and collectibles.

Steve Unverferth and Tony Favello responded in a different way. They took on the store’s name, bought its shelves and hired its staff.

Art pushes gentrification discussion on Cherokee Street

Mar 19, 2015
Artist Alberto Aguilar unrolls signs at El Torito grocey
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

The Luminary Center for the Arts casts a wide net with the current show Counterpublic. It addresses issues of gentrification on Cherokee Street and in the surrounding neighborhood.

A woodburning stove is the main source of heat at Marx Hardware & Paint Co. in the Old North neighborhood. The store was founded in 1875 but has been in its "new" location since 1881.
Maria Altman|St. Louis Public Radio

There's been a buzz in the St. Louis hardware store community that one of their own could be closing.

Hanneke Hardware & Industrial Supply Co., a longtime business in The Hill neighborhood, is considering closing its retail business. Opened in 1927 by Carl Hanneke Sr., the store has exchanged hands in recent years and was bought by Christine Kantis and Michael Grewe in 2011. Right now the owners are considering their options. An assistant told St. Louis Public Radio they'll know more next week.

Yacovelli's Restaurant Closing After 95 Years

Dec 25, 2014
The original Yacovelli's opened in 1919, but the restaurant has been in its current Florissant location since 1965.
Stephanie Lecci

After 95 years in business, thousands of customers, and hundreds of employees, the well-known Yacovelli's Restaurant in Florissant will close its doors Jan. 1.

The Italian restaurant and banquet center has been in the Yacovelli family since 1919. But owners Jack and Jan Yacovelli decided in September that it was time to close the iconic eatery.

"We’re tired, we want to have more time," Jan said. "We both have our health. It’s time to enjoy life. We’ve worked really hard our whole life."