Melanoma | St. Louis Public Radio

Melanoma

Rates of head and neck melanoma among young people increased by more than 50% from 1995 to 2014, according to new research from St. Louis University.
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The deadliest form of skin cancer is becoming more common in children and young adults.

Head and neck melanoma cases in young people rose more than 50% in the U.S. and Canada in less than two decades, according to new research from St. Louis University. Melanoma rates have increased the fastest among young white men — a group often overlooked in skin-cancer-prevention campaigns. 

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, July 31, 2009 - A new health report has some tanning enthusiasts yawning, while others can feel their skin crawling.

The article, released recently by the World Health Organization's International Agency for Research on Cancer, reclassified tanning beds as carcinogenic to humans. The new classification places the UV-emitting devices in the same category as gamma radiation and cigarettes.

On Science: Tanning to death

Jul 8, 2008

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: July 8, 2008 - Almost all the cells in your body replace themselves as they wear out, your skin cells more frequently than any other tissue. Exposed to a lot of wear and tear, the cells of your skin divide about every 27 days to replace dead or damaged cells. In each instance, the skin sloughs off dead cells from the surface and replaces these with new cells from beneath. The average person will lose about 105 pounds of skin by the time he or she turns 70.

Patient's own immune system cures cancer

Jun 26, 2008

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: June 26, 2008 - Lucky patient "number four," who took part in an experimental melanoma treatment program at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, has experienced an amazing outcome: complete remission of a malignant melanoma that had already spread to his internal organs. The New England Journal of Medicine published the report June 19.