Missouri German Consortium | St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri German Consortium

Dorris Keeven-Franke leads several of Archer Alexander's descendants through a tour of Alexander's life. They're standing here at the Pitman family cemetery. The Pitmans were one of Alexander's owners.
Chad Davis | St. Louis Public Radio

For the past 30 years, Keith Winstead has been tracing the many generations of his family history.

“When I first started genealogy, I thought I’d be lucky to go and find a third great-grandparent. I got pictures now of 10 generations,” Winstead said.

On a cold and windy day he was at Bellefontaine Cemetery with about 15 other family members who hail from different parts of the U.S., such as Louisville, Atlanta, New York and Cincinnati.

An honorary street sign notes Providence Place's original street name – Knapstein Place – in the Dutchtown neighborhood.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis will soon have Bismarck Street again.

A yellow commemorative sign will go up Saturday morning at the corner of Seventh and Lami streets in the Soulard neighborhood, just weeks before the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I.

In 1833, two men from Giessen, Germany, decided to immigrate to the United States where they hoped to create their own utopia with the freedoms and democracy they desired but did not have under an aristocracy. They recruited hundreds of others and formed the Giessen Emigration Society.

“It was the year 1834 when 500 Germans came over here to Missouri with the big idea of creating a German state as a new state within the United States of America,” Peter Roloff told “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh on Tuesday.