Missouri History Museum | St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri History Museum

Courtesy of Missouri History Museum

Every day it is a natural inclination for humans to have a question and seek an answer for it.

Some questions might come across as trivial and silly, and others may dig deeper into one’s life and purpose. And some may help to unify and unfurl decades of preconceived notions.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The Missouri History Museum dates back to 1866, but as it begins the task of finding a new president to succeed Robert Archibald, a lot of the focus will be on the past few months.

Art.1

Six years ago, the annual Africa World Documentary Film Festival debuted in St. Louis.

The festival is back at the Missouri History Museum and runs through Sunday, March 3rd.  The three-day event features documentaries from filmmakers all over the world that are focused on social culture, sexual identity, mental disabilities, and more.

After showing in St. Louis, the films will travel to nine other venues across three continents.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The St. Louis circuit attorney’s office has presented issues involving the Missouri History Museum for consideration by a grand jury.

Two commissioners of the Zoo-Museum District – Charles Valier and Gloria Wessels – said they have received subpoenas from the grand jury asking for documents involving three issues:

This article first appeared in the St. Louis: Under sometimes sharp questioning by commissioners of the Zoo-Museum District, the head of the Missouri History Museum board of trustees defended on Thursday the $45,000-a-month consulting contract granted to Robert Archibald after he resigned as head of the museum late last year.

John Roberts, who is also acting as de facto head of the museum until Archibald’s successor can be chosen, said that the six-month consulting agreement was designed so that Archibald can continue to cultivate big-time donors to the museum with whom he established relationships during his 25-year tenure as president.

(via Wikimedia Commons)

An investigation of the Missouri History Museum released on Wednesday found no evidence of document shredding.

Former U.S. Attorney Edward Dowd, of the St. Louis law firm Dowd-Bennett, was contracted by the history museum to investigate claims that museum staff destroyed documents following a $566,000 payout to former Museum President Bob Archibald, for unused vacation.

(via Wikimedia Commons)

An appraisal released on Tuesday shows that the Missouri History Museum paid ex-Mayor Freeman Bosley Jr. over three times market rate for property Bosley sold the museum in 2006.

The sale which was only recently discovered was the catalyst behind a series of events which led to the resignation of Museum President Bob Archibald.

Credit (via Flickr/Reading Tom)

Updated at 8:00 p.m. with statement from Missouri History Museum.

The prosecutor in the city of St. Louis will look into some of the governance and oversight issues plaguing the Missouri History Museum.

"Upon request, we have agreed to review concerns brought to the St. Louis Board of Aldermen in connection with the Missouri History Museum. At this point, it would be inappropriate to discuss this matter further," Jennifer Joyce said in an written statement. 

(via Wikimedia Commons)

While Robert Archibald is stepping down as president of the Missouri History Museum, he will be getting a financial payout of close to a million dollars.

The museum’s board of trustees accepted Archibald’s resignation on Friday.

Despite the circumstances of his departure, Archibald himself will still be receiving a payout of $566,000 for unused vacation, plus $270,000 for a six-month consult contract.  All told, $836,000, as he walks out the door.

Courtesy Mo. History Museum

Updated at 4:45 with comments from ZMD board member Gloria Wessels.

Updated with comments from Zoo-Museum District board member Jerome Glick, and to correct Archibald's tenure at the museum.

The president of the Missouri History Museum in Forest Park has resigned.

A spokesman for the museum confirmed that Robert Archibald submitted his resignation to the chair of the museum's Board of Trustees today. The spokesman, Everett Dietle, did not have any additional information. The board will meet Friday morning at the museum.

Credit (via Flickr/Reading Tom)

It appears as though a couple of members of one of the oversight boards for the Missouri History Museum are getting their wish. The Board of Aldermen appears poised to jump into the fray over the way the museum is being run.

trolley missouri history museum
Rachel Heidenry | 2009

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon - Robert Archibald has signed his new one-year contract as president of the Missouri History Museum with a salary of $375,000, a housing allowance of $33,000, the possibility of a raise and a bonus – and more than $566,000 for 410 vacation days he said he never used.

(via Wikimedia Commons)

Several months of scrutiny into the management of the Missouri History Museum has resulted in little change.  The commissioners of the St. Louis Zoo-Museum District have voted not to accept an audit committee report calling for tougher governance of the museum.

A vote to accept an audit committee report resulted in a 4-4 tie, meaning the motion failed.

The museum has been at the center of a months-long controversy involving a cozy relationship between embattled Museum President Bob Archibald and his board of trustees.

ZMD Board Says History Museum Needs Complete Overhaul

Nov 8, 2012
Credit (via Flickr/Reading Tom)

The board charged with distributing taxpayer funds to the five members of the St. Louis Zoo-Museum District says the Missouri History Museum needs a complete restructuring.  The Zoo-Museum District was created to oversee public funding for the St. Louis Zoo, the St. Louis Art Museum, the St. Louis Science Center, the Missouri Botanical Garden and the Missouri History Museum.

The ZMD Audit Committee met Thursday and claim the reforms recommended for the History Museum by former Senator Jack Danforth do not go far enough.

(via Flickr/Reading Tom)

Updated 3:55 p.m. October 18

Sen. John Danforth has accepted his role as negotiator.

Courtesy of Auvelia Arnold

An exhibit now on display at the Missouri History Museum takes a look at the early history of the African American community in Kirkwood.

St. Louis Public Radio’s Julie Bierach spoke with Curator David Lobbig about the multimedia project that traces the first settlement before the Civil War to suburban development after World War II.

When you and your colleagues came up with the idea for “Kirkwood Roots,” what did you envision?

Community Cinema: Remembering Daisy Bates

Jan 11, 2012

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Jan. 11, 2012 - If you have yet to go to the Missouri History Museum for their monthly Community Cinema night, it should be your New Year's resolution. "Daisy Bates: First Lady of Little Rock"  will be shown at 7 p.m. Jan. 12, followed by roundtable discussions with some of the first students to integrate St. Louis Public Schools. The film is part of the Community Cinema Series, a partnership among Nine Network, Independent Television Service (ITVS) and Missouri History Museum.

(The Midland Montly Magazine, 1865)

The Missouri History Museum is opening a new exhibit Saturday called “The Civil War in Missouri.”

There’s a lot of ground to cover in a state that was bitterly divided by the war and saw more than 1,200 battles and skirmishes.

But the museum, founded just one year after the Civil War ended, has a treasure trove of artifacts from the era that bring the conflict to life.

St. Louis Public Radio’s Maria Altman got a sneak peak.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Nov. 11, 2011 - Missouri was one of the ugliest places on earth during the U.S. Civil War, and if you don't believe that spend a few hours at the new exhibit opening this weekend at the Missouri History Museum.

(provided by Carla Alexander)

On the corner of Garrison and Sheridan in St. Louis stands a vacant building that for decades housed a thriving African American business. Its owner is remembered as an entrepreneur and informal activist during the civil rights movement. But now, the building is crumbling.

Pages