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Missouri Humanities Council

The Lone Wolf Club, shown here, was a speakeasy during Prohibition. The club, which stood at the edge of what is now Castlewood State Park, later became a private tavern.
Castlewood State Park

The 18th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution established the prohibition of alcohol in the U.S. Enforcement of the new law started on Jan. 17, 1920.

In this episode of St. Louis on the Air, we recognize the 100th anniversary of Prohibition by diving into St. Louis’ rich Prohibition-era history.

Gregory Wolk, Heritage Resources coordinator for the Missouri Humanities Council, talked about an unveiling of the panel, "America's Long Road to Freedom: Missouri's Civil War," at Harris-Stowe State University. Joining the conversation by phone was Grego
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

This Thursday, Harris-Stowe State University and the Missouri Humanities Council are commemorating some of the city’s past residents in a new Civil War panel titled “Long Roads to Freedom.” It will be unveiled on the grounds of the university near the former site of John B. Henderson’s home, the Missouri senator who co-authored the constitutional amendment abolishing slavery.

The panel also honors others who advanced the cause of equal rights, such as Henderson’s wife Mary Henderson – who was very involved in the cause of women’s suffrage and women’s rights – and Hiram Reed, the first slave freed on the authority of the American military during the
Civil War.

Joining Monday’s St. Louis on the Air discussion with St. Louis Public Radio reporter Jeremy D. Goodwin to delve into the topic’s history were Gregory Wolk, Heritage Resources coordinator for the Missouri Humanities Council, and Gregory Carr, an instructor in speech and theater at Harris-Stowe State University.