Missouri University of Science and Technology | St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri University of Science and Technology

School robotics competitions like this one at Missouri S&T in 2016 can help students develop an interest in STEM fields. 3/15/16
Sam O'Keefe | Missouri S&T

ROLLA — Rural Missouri school districts short on money sometimes struggle with teaching the three R's, so the idea of adding advanced science and technology instruction can be daunting.

A $250,000 state grant through Missouri University of Science and Technology in Rolla is helping 41 school districts in 10 counties in south-central Missouri bolster their offerings.

A section of the Big Piney River that runs through Fort Leonard Wood. This is one of the places that provides habitat to endandered species that live at the base. 10-02-19
Jonathan Ahl | St. Louis Public Radio

Fort Leonard Wood is home to more than 6,000 soldiers and at least three endangered species.

Those animals and two more that are threatened are protected and cared for despite living among shelling and other military training.

And scientists flock to the installation, saying it’s a boon to their research and gives them an opportunity to help these animals.

This cannon made by Missouri S&T faculty and students is being used to test mine seals.
Jonathan Ahl | St. Louis Public Radio

ROLLA - Sometimes, the best way to see how strong something is means shooting it with a cannon loaded up with stuff found in a coal mine.

While this may sound like a TV comedy bit, it’s part of serious research at the Missouri University of Science and Technology that could make coal mines safer for workers.

Missouri S&T researchers will look at ways to improve the life of roads, like this section of I-44 in Rolla
Jonathan Ahl | St. Louis Public Radio

More than 40 million motorists are expected to hit the road in the U.S. this holiday weekend, and many of them will encounter highways that are cracked or littered with potholes.

Missouri University of Science and Technology is part of an effort to make those roads last longer. 

Missouri S&T engineering researchers inspect a damaged apartment building in Jefferson City in May 2019.
Eli Chen | St. Louis Public Radio

Among the volunteers and workers moving furniture, broken lumber and fallen trees at Hawthorne Park apartments in Jefferson City last weekend, three engineers with a large remote control watched a drone fly over a building that was missing a chunk of its roof.

A team of engineering professors and students from the Missouri University of Science and Technology began inspecting damages after a violent tornado struck parts of the state capital last Wednesday. For several years, some have been studying ways to design houses in Tornado Alley states like Missouri to withstand extreme weather events.

Missouri S&T engineering professor Grace Yan and her students survey post-tornado damages in Jefferson City in May 2019.
Missouri University of Science & Technology

Engineering researchers from the Missouri University of Science and Technology are spending several days in Jefferson City to study the destruction caused by a tornado that battered the city late Wednesday.

Missouri S&T engineering professor Grace Yan and her graduate students began Thursday to interview residents and capture drone footage of the damages. Her research has focused on designing buildings to become more resistant to tornadoes.

There have been many examples of damages in Jefferson City that are unique to tornadoes, such as roofs being torn off, Yan said.

Waters continue to rise around I-55 near Butler Hill on Wednesday morning. May 2017
File Photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Engineers at Missouri University of Science & Technology in Rolla are developing algorithms that could provide early warnings for motorists about flooded roads.

The system could warn drivers to stay off flooded roads. Researchers began the yearlong project to use artificial intelligence to enhance flood evacuation plans in February for transportation agencies in the Midwest, including the Missouri Department of Transportation. The work focuses on the Meramec River basin in eastern Missouri and the areas of Nebraska and northwest Missouri that experienced record-breaking floods in late March from the Missouri River.

This is one of the solar powered homes in the study of new lead acid batteries on November 9. 2018
Jonathan Ahl | St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri University of Science and Technology and two companies that manufacture batteries in Missouri are teaming up on a research project that could make it easier for homes to run exclusively on renewable energy.

The university and representatives from the businessesannounced the three-year project Friday on the Rolla campus.

A drone flies near a bridge
Sodapix | Thinkstock

Missouri could soon send flying drones to the state's bridges, using them to doing difficult and dangerous work long done by workers.

About 56,000 bridges in the United States require major repairs, according to the Federal Highway Administration. Missouri ranks No. 4 in the country for its number of structurally deficient bridges. 

At an experimental mine at the Missouri University of S&T in Rolla, scientists are setting off explosives around lab mice and cell cultures to study how exposure to blasts in combat damage the brains of military personnel.

Neuroscientists at the University of Missouri-Columbia and Stanford University are leading the research, funded by the U.S. Department of Defense. The study is focused on mild traumatic brain injury, the most common type of brain injury affecting military personnel. However, the condition is difficult to diagnose and not well studied.

 

Field of students at a graduation
j.o.h.n. walker | Flickr

No one has ever mistaken Rolla, Mo., for Cambridge, Mass. But new college rankings place the schools in both towns on just about the same level.

The report from a unit of the Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C., is an attempt to determine how well colleges prepare students for high-paying careers.

Philae Lander on Comet
ESA/Rosetta/Philae/CIVA

There is a St. Louis-area connection to the mission that recently landed a spacecraft on a comet for the first time.

Paul Friz is wrapping up an internship at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.

His interest in space started as a teenager looking at the stars at his family’s home in Creve Coeur, Missouri.

When he was 14, Friz saved money from a summer of mowing lawns to buy his first telescope.

Missouri S&T

Researchers at the Missouri University of Science and Technology are conducting work that could shape the next generation of nuclear reactors.
 
The state's first nuclear reactor was constructed more than 50 years ago at the Rolla school. Now, researchers there are tracking and measuring the movement of radioisotopes. Their goal is to understand how nuclear fuel pebbles would behave in what are called "fourth generation" nuclear reactors.
 

Mo. universities to get foothold in China

Sep 22, 2011
(St. Louis Public Radio)

Two of Missouri's public universities will be partnering with a college in China to open a new university in the central part of the country.

The University of Missouri-St. Louis and Missouri University of Science and Technology in Rolla will work with Tianfu College in Mianyang, in Sichuan Province, to open Sichuan Missouri University.

Lockdown lifted on Missouri S&T campus after shooting suspect apprehended

May 12, 2011

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The location of Missouri University of Science and Technology in Rolla, Mo.

Updated 1:40 p.m.

  • 31-year-old Cody Willcoxson, the alleged shooting suspect, is in custody. He was captured when a Missouri State Highway Patrol trooper on a routine patrol spotted the stolen car Willcoxson was driving.
  • Willcoxson was taken into custody following a short pursuit, but Capt. Lee Ann Kenley, Troop I's commander, says Willcoxson did not resist arrest.
  • Willcoxson suffered a superficial wound sometime during the day and was being evaluated by emergency medical personnel. He will be taken to the Phelps County jail after receiving medical treatment.
  • Willcoxson already faces four felonious assault on law enforcement charges for firing at Rolla police during the pursuit. Bail has been set at $1 million. Rolla police chief Mark Kearse expects Willcoxson to face additional charges from authorities at Fort Leonard Wood, St. Robert and Pulaski County.
  • Authorities found drugs, believed to be methamphetamine, in Willcoxon's original car, which he abandoned in Rolla. They have not located the original weapon, which is believed to be an assault-like rifle.
  • Police believe Willcoxson acted alone, and have no motive for the shooting.

Updated 1:21 p.m.:

According to Missouri S&T's Twitter account:

  • "Shooting suspect apprehended south of Rolla, Missouri S&T lockdown is lifted by Chief Laughlin."

Updated 12:12 p.m. via the Associated Press:

Authorities say a gunman who entered and left Missouri University of Science and Technology building earlier tried breaking into a nearby Army base and fired on police who pursued him.

Fort Leonard Wood spokesman Mike Warren says the suspect tried to enter the Army installation through its west gate Thursday morning. The security guard determined the man's identification didn't look legitimate and told him to leave. Instead, the driver accelerated and drove through the gate.

Military police pursued him until he fled the base, and police from nearby St. Robert chased him toward Rolla about 30 miles away.

St. Robert police chief Curtis Curenton says his officers were fired on with what appeared to be an AK-47 machine gun during the pursuit.

The Rolla campus is on lockdown.

Missouri S&T Chancellor Carney to retire

Jan 26, 2011

At the conclusion of his State of the University Address today, Missouri University of Science and Technology Chancellor John F. (Jack) Carney III announced his plans to retire.

A press release from the university shared a portion of his announcement:

Paideia Academy, which had planned to open its school year the day after Labor Day despite having lost its charter to operate, won't be opening after all.

Fred Robinson, president of the school's board, said Thursday that an effort to secure financing for the school had not worked out, so it would not be accepting students, at least for now. He said the decision was made earlier this week.

"The deal we were working on didn't work," Robinson said, declining to give further details. "The deal we were working on fell through."