Obituary | St. Louis Public Radio

Obituary

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Nov. 30, 2011 - Dr. John H. Gladney is being remembered as much as a mentor to younger generations as he is for being a trailblazer among blacks in medicine in St. Louis. Dr. Gladney, who died Saturday (Nov. 26, 2011), was being treated for a pulmonary embolism at Barnes-Jewish Hospital.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Nov. 24, 2011 - Katherine Anderson had no intention of running the business that family and friends had prodded her and her husband into starting in 1981. But when her husband died suddenly in 1996, she had to make a quick decision. She immediately decided to take over Andy's Seasonings, the business that began with barbecue sauce she and her husband concocted and cooked up in batches on her kitchen stove.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Nov. 8, 2011 - Don L. Wolfsberger, who built a food packaging business, had a hand in electing three Republican presidents, led major civic ventures and all but bought a town, died Thursday at Mercy Hospital, of complications due to Parkinson's disease. He was 78 and had lived in Frontenac and Clayton.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Nov. 7, 2011 - Former U.S. Rep. Mel Hancock, R-Springfield, died early Sunday at age 82, according to various press reports from his hometown.

Mr. Hancock was the creator of Missouri's "Hancock Amendment,'' passed in 1980, which restricts how much annual income Missouri state government can collect.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Nov. 5, 2011 - Judy Widdicombe, an obstetrical nurse who helped guide women to safe abortions before the procedure was legal and who opened the first abortion clinic in Missouri after Roe v. Wade made it the law of the land, died Thursday, (Nov. 3) at Gambrill Gardens Retirement Community. She was 73.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Nov. 3, 2011 - To appreciate of the complexity of Paul A. Dewald, who died Thursday, and to discover his place in the cultural history as well as the medical history of America, it is helpful to consider a portrait taken of his father, Jacob, only moments after the infant Paul was born in New York City almost a century ago.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Oct. 26, 2011 - When classical pianist Vladimir Horowitz, who was known for his frequent "retirements," left St. Louis off his 1974-75 "comeback" tour, James Cain, then manager of the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra, flew to Columbus, Ohio, and cajoled the pianist into adding the city to his schedule.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Oct. 24, 2011 - I'm here in the public confessional not looking for absolution but hoping to employ the medium of confession as a means of examining how one deals with his conscience, when he has erred and strayed from a state of loyalty, and furthermore, how to proceed in the future in a more grace-filled direction.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Oct. 20, 2011 - Howard "Tim" Hays, who was at the helm of a California newspaper when it won a Pulitzer Prize for a series exposing corruption in the courts and who took two First Amendment cases to the U.S. Supreme Court and won, died Oct. 14 at Barnes-Jewish Hospital.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Oct. 18, 2011 - H. Parker Smith, a St. Louis businessman and civic leader whose early career was shaped by two intense periods of active duty in the U.S. Navy, died Monday (Oct. 17) of bladder cancer at St. Luke's Hospital's Surrey Place skilled nursing facility. He was 89 years old and most recently lived at 1 McKnight Place.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Oct. 14, 2011 - Services will be held Saturday morning for Anna May Slay, the mother of St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay. Mrs. Slay died Thursday morning after a long illness.

Many in her large family of 11 children -- including the mayor -- were at her side when she died, a spokeswoman said. The mayor's father, longtime Democratic activist Francis R. Slay, died in March.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Oct. 7, 2011 - In a description of himself for a 1999 exhibit, Ernest Stix wrote: "I'm an addicted and incorrigible scavenger (who finds) convenience and challenge in multiples and delight in discerning and discovering art in the overlooked."

The well-known "found art" sculptor, who saw beauty and function where others saw trash, died Tuesday following a brief hospitalization at Missouri Baptist Medical Center. Mr. Stix was 95 and had lived in University City nearly six decades.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Oct. 4, 2011 - When Rabbi Sholom Rivkin died on Saturday, an orthodox Jewish tradition in America died with him. He was the last chief rabbi in the nation. The position had made the St. Louis region special.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Sept. 29, 2011 - Dick Berg, whose skills were worthy of an architect but who chose to craft messages that helped to transform major institutions, died Monday at the health center at the Pines at Davidson, a retirement community in North Carolina where he had lived for the past three years.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Sept. 27, 2011 - Mourners gathered tonight outside artist/entrepreneur Bob Cassilly's City Museum to pay tribute to the man whose art can be seen throughout the area. Cassilly, 61, died Monday morning in a bulldozer at the site of his newest project Cementland, under construction in north St. Louis.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Sept. 27, 2011 - Bob Cassilly, creator of City Museum, was found dead Monday while working at Cementland, his newest project.

No one could deny that Bob Cassilly was a man who could see the possibilities in a situation that escaped everyone else.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Sept. 21, 2011 - A car accident in 1989 left John Mann, then 23 years old, in a coma for a week. After he recovered enough to go home, doctors were still predicting that his severe brain injury would require him to work in a "sheltered workshop." Instead, he went on to earn an MBA, hold executive positions, start a business, revitalize a community center that provides a safe haven for thousands of St. Louis children and lead the effort to open the city's first charter high school.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Sept. 7, 2011 - After a 19-day sit-in in 2005, including six days on a hunger strike, Washington University students who had demanded a "living wage" for university janitors and groundskeepers were ready to make a deal. So was the administration. But before a settlement could be reached, the students wanted to know what the protest would cost them.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Sept. 1, 2011 - Mark Shapiro, the co-founder of Louis London, a premier brand marketing and advertising firm that developed campaigns for some of the nation's most prominent businesses, died unexpectedly on Tuesday (Aug. 30), at his home in Clayton. To celebrate his 60th birthday this year, Mr. Shapiro had begun training for the Chicago Marathon on Oct. 9.

His son Andrew said the cause of death has not yet been determined.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Aug. 31, 2011 - For much of his working life, William Hyland had been an advertising executive, representing some of the most well-known sports franchises in the nation.

But Mr. Hyland was right at 75 years old when he began a new career as a real estate agent. The St. Louis Post-Dispatch marked the change in its society column on Oct. 25, 1998: "Erstwhile ad exec William B. Hyland has joined Edward L. Bakewell as sales associate. ..."

Retirement, said his daughter, was simply not in his vocabulary.

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