Patty Hagen | St. Louis Public Radio

Patty Hagen

Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

On the fourth floor of downtown-based startup incubator T-Rex, construction workers are putting on the final touches of Geosaurus. The marbled flooring they’re layering mimics St. Louis’ geographic landscape stretching west of the Mississippi River.

The geospatial resource center is slated to open in January. 

Drawings by a joint venture between McCarthy Building Companies and HITT Contracting show an aerial view of the new western headquarters of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency in north St. Louis.
Provided | McCarthy-HITT

Business, academic and civic leaders are coming together to plot the future of the geospatial industry in St. Louis. 

A new initiative announced Thursday — GeoFutures — is intended to provide a framework for how to drive investment in location intelligence technology and the workforce to support it.

“We want St. Louis to be seen as the international hub of innovation and expertise in the geospatial industry, period,” said Patty Hagen, executive director of startup incubator T-Rex.

James Hillis uses geospatial technology to figure out where his company should plot more urban gardens to reduce food insecurity in north St. Louis. May 29, 2019
Corinne Ruff | St. Louis Public Radio

Inside Good Life Growing’s newest urban garden, co-founder James Hillis is using an iPad to pull up maps of the city. The urban agriculture organization is trying to reduce food insecurity in north St. Louis, and mapping tools help him figure out where to plot new grow spaces.

Hillis’ maps look fairly simple, but they’re powered by Geographic Information Systems data that pulls in all kinds of factors about the local community.