Real ID | St. Louis Public Radio

Real ID

Illinois REAL IDs have a gold star in the top right corner.
Illinois Secretary of State Office

Updated March 28 with the new October 2021 deadline

Like the rest of the country, Illinois residents will need to get Real IDs if they want to continue to use their licenses or other state identification cards to board domestic flights and enter federal buildings starting late next year.

In March, the state started issuing Real IDs in compliance with the security standards set by the 2005 Real ID act. Compliant licenses are marked by a gold star in the top right corner of the card. 

Missouri Department of Revenue

Updated March 28 with the new October 2021 deadline

Missourians can now apply for updated licenses and other state identification cards, which will be required to board airplanes and enter federal buildings beginning Oct. 1, 2021. 

The Missouri Department of Revenue is offering the new IDs at all state license offices to comply with the federal Real ID Act of 2005. The special licenses have a gold star on the top-right corner of the card. 

File photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis’ $10-an-hour minimum wage is a thing of the past. So is a Missouri resident’s ability to sue when he or she thinks age or race was part of the reason for being fired.

That’s because several new laws have taken effect as of Monday.

Ameren's Callaway nuclear power plant produces about 19 percent of the electricity the company generates in Missouri. It is the only nuclear energy facility in the state.
File photo | Véronique LaCapra | St. Louis Public Radio

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security has extended Missouri’s time to comply with the federal Real ID law, which means Missouri residents can use a current driver’s license to get into federal facilities, military bases and nuclear power plants.

Nationwide, Real ID-compliant identification has been required to get into such facilities since October 2015. Missouri’s extension goes through Oct. 10, Homeland Security spokeswoman Justine Whelan said. The extension was granted Monday. 

Commerical planes parked at a St. Louis Lambert International Airport terminal.
St. Louis Lambert International Airport

Updated at 8:10 p.m. with how much it'll cost to switch to a REAL ID license — Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens signed a bill Monday aimed at averting a scenario in which Missouri residents could have been turned away at airports starting in January for lack of valid identification.

The legislation will give residents the option to get driver's licenses or other identification cards that comply with the federal REAL ID Act. Compliance with the tougher proof-of-identity requirements is necessary at airports, some federal facilities and military bases.

Rhonda Hamm-Niebruegge, thet director of the St. Louis Lambert International Airport discussed privatization, REAL ID, growth at the airport and more on Tuesday's "St. Louis on the Air."
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

During peak air travel season this summer, St. Louis Lambert International Airport will see about 260 flights per day, with about 71 total non-stop flights. This June, Terminal 2’s E Concourse will expand by four more gates to accommodate Southwest Airlines travel. 

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, St. Louis Lambert International Airport Director Rhonda Hamm-Niebruegge joined host Don Marsh to discuss recent growth at the airport, REAL ID compliance, the recent spate of airline controversy and talks about privatizing the airport. 

MoBikeFed | Flickr

Missouri lawmakers solved the puzzle over federally mandated IDs on Thursday night, sending Republican Gov. Eric Greitens a bill that would ease travelers’ and military members’ worries come January.

It was one of several pieces of legislation that reached the finish line ahead of the 6 p.m. Friday deadline for the 2017 session. Here’s a look at Thursday’s action:

Missouri Capitol in Jefferson City, 2014
vinwim / St Louis Public Radio

A proposal to finally create a prescription drug monitoring program was revived in the Missouri House on Tuesday, while the Senate came to terms with a 12-year-old federal ID law.

Friday is the end of the 2017 legislative session. Here’s a more detailed look at the action Tuesday (and very early Wednesday), as well as a count of how many bills were sent to Gov. Eric Greitens:

MoBikeFed | Flickr

Updated 6 p.m. April 28 to correct that Missouri would be among the only states with an abortion notification law — The only thing Missouri lawmakers must do in the final two weeks of 2017 legislative session is pass the state budget for the coming fiscal year.

But there are a whole lot of things they could do — some of which Gov. Eric Greitens wants them to do — such as tightening abortion regulations, raising the standard for workplace discrimination and creating the last-in-the-country prescription drug monitoring program.

Sen. Bill Eigel, April 2017
Marshall Griffin | St. Louis Public Radio

On the latest edition of the Politically Speaking podcast, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum welcomes Sen. Bill Eigel back to the program.

Bram Sable-Smith I KBIA

Efforts to get Missouri to comply with the 2005 federal REAL ID law will resume once state lawmakers return to the Capitol on Monday for the final seven weeks of the session.

Identical bills in the House and Senate, HB 151 and SB 37/224, would allow the state to issue  driver’s licenses that comply with REAL ID standards while continuing to issue ones that don’t. Backers say allowing both types will respect the privacy rights of a Missouri driver who doesn’t want to share any particular personal data with the federal government as a result of having a REAL ID-compliant driver’s license.

ID checks might be more difficult for residents of Missouri, Illinois and two other states.
Department of Homeland Security

Missouri IDs do not meet the federal standard, and lawmakers are dragging their feet to do something about it. 

After 9/11, Congress passed the Real ID Act in 2005 as an extra security measure in airports and military facilities. The Department of Homeland Security’s Secure Driver’s Licenses web page includes a quote from The 9/11 Commission Report, “For terrorists, travel documents are as important as weapons.”

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Sept. 9, 2013 - A  review by the state auditor's office concludes that the Missouri Department of Revenue is between a rock and a hard place when it comes to processing drivers licenses. No matter what it does, it’s violating a state law. The only question is: Which one?

A similar quandary involves the federal REAL ID mandates, which the department is supposed to ignore under a General Assembly decree four years ago. However, the review warns that Missouri drivers licenses soon might not be recognized as valid IDs under federal law, unless legislators relent.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Missouri House Speaker Tim Jones appears to be in a standoff with Gov. Jay Nixon’s office, after a judge stepped in Thursday to block Jones’ attempt force the governor’s top aides to testify before a state House panel.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, June 27, 2013- Missouri House Speaker Tim Jones appears to be in a standoff with Gov. Jay Nixon’s office, after a judge stepped in Thursday to block Jones’ attempt force the governor’s top aides to testify before a state House panel.

The panel, called the Bipartisan Committee on Privacy Protection, is probing why the state Drivers License Division – part of the Department of Revenue – is continuing to scan and retain copies of the personal documents – such as drivers licenses and passports --  that people must submit to obtain drivers licenses.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, May 14, 2013 - By a vote of 118-40, the Missouri House has overwhelmingly approved a bill that bars state agencies from scanning or retaining any personal documents, such as a birth certificate, that are presented to obtain a driver’s license or nondriver ID.

But the House also went further, adding amendments to the bill (SB 252) that bar:

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, May 6, 2013 - Jefferson County’s veteran Sheriff Glenn Boyer is among a group of law-enforcement experts tapped by Missouri House Speaker Tim Jones to serve on “an independent, bipartisan investigative committee” to delve into the continued controversy over the state Department of Revenue’s handling of such documents as concealed-carry permits and birth certificates.

At a news conference today in the state Capitol, the speaker said his aim is “to determine the extent of the scandal, find those responsible, and make sure they are held accountable.”

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, May 1, 2013 - The Missouri Capitol's continued debate over the state's scanning of personal documents, including concealed-carry permits, has taken another turn as state Sen. Kurt Schaefer, R-Columbia, has raised the prospect of doing away with the state’s new system for producing drivers licenses and returning to the old over-the-counter setup.

Meanwhile, Gov. Jay Nixon’s office has swiftly sought to dispute questions raised by Republicans, including Schaefer, about a 2010 letter from the federal Department of Homeland Security that lauded Nixon for complying with aspects of the federal REAL ID mandate.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The Missouri Capitol's continued debate over the state's scanning of personal documents, including concealed-carry permits, has taken another turn as state Sen. Kurt Schaefer, R-Columbia, has raised the prospect of doing away with the state’s new system for producing drivers licenses and returning to the old over-the-counter setup.

Meanwhile, Gov. Jay Nixon’s office has swiftly sought to dispute questions raised by Republicans, including Schaefer, about a 2010 letter from the federal Department of Homeland Security that lauded Nixon for complying with aspects of the federal REAL ID mandate.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, March 5, 2013 - Lt. Gov. Peter Kinder has asked for a meeting with Gov. Jay Nixon – possibly their first in almost five years – to “discuss Missouri Department of Revenue practices concerning the retaining and disseminating of private information from Missouri citizens.”

But it doesn’t appear Kinder, a Republican, is going to get it. When asked if Nixon planned to comment, a spokesman replied tersely, “We don’t.”