Rita Days | St. Louis Public Radio

Rita Days

Marissanne Lewis-Thompson | St. Louis Public Radio

Families are nearly settled into 41 new three-bedroom homes recently completed in Pine Lawn.

The $10.5 million Pine Lawn Manor, developed by Beyond Housing, is bringing more affordable housing to the north St. Louis County municipality. The community development corporation also built a $7 million development that includes 31 single-family three-bedroom homes in 2017. 

Officials are considering the addition of turnstiles to the MetroLink system.
File photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

The St. Louis County Council on Tuesday backed a bond refinancing plan for the Bi-State Development Corporation, which operates light rail and bus services throughout the region.

The move, which could help fund enhanced security services, comes as the transit service is asking for more money from the county — a request that’s going to be the subject of a council hearing in the coming weeks.

St. Louis County Councilwoman-elect Rita Days
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

On the latest episode of Politically Speaking, Rita Days talks with St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Julie O’Donoghue about her impending service on the St. Louis County Council.

Days was elected to fill out the rest of Hazel Erby’s term in the 1st District, which takes in more than 40 cities in central and north St. Louis County. The Bel-Nor Democrat’s term goes until the end of 2022.

Eric Fey, the Democratic director for the St. Louis County Board of Elections.
File photo by Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

It would be an understatement to say that Tuesday was not a good day for Eric Fey.

The Democratic director for the St. Louis County Board of Election Commissioners is in charge of the largest and most complicated local electoral jurisdiction in the state. And during yesterday’s slate of municipal elections, polling places across the county ran out of paper ballots — even in the early hours of the morning. Things got so dire that a court ultimately extended voting hours — after the polls had already closed.

(via Flickr/lowjumpingfrog)

(Updated 9:08 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 20)

Rita Days, St. Louis County’s Democratic director of elections, says she’s been removed from office at the behest of new County Executive Steve Stenger.

The county’s Board of Election Commissioners voted Tuesday to remove Days as of Friday. She says she is to be replaced by Eric Fey, now the executive assistant to County Councilman Pat Dolan, D-Richmond Heights.

Although she remains on the payroll a few more days, Days says her computer access already has been cut off.

voting booth for paper ballot
File photo | Rachel Heidenry | St. Louis Beacon

A week ago, USAToday and other national media outlets were reporting a surge of voter registrations in Ferguson, the city at the center of unrest since the fatal police shooting of teenaged Michael Brown on Aug. 9.

In fact, no such surge occurred.

"It was a simple error, with a not-so-simple outcome," said Laura Swinford, spokeswoman for the Missouri secretary of state's office.

An audience member shows Ferguson Mayor James Knowles III a rubber bullet wound that he says he received during unrest in the north St. Louis County city. A forum sponsored by St. Louis Public Radio became heated, with ire being directed at Knowles.
Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

A forum Thursday evening peering into Ferguson’s longstanding tensions as well as the St. Louis region’s racial divisions became angry and heated, with most of a crowd’s ire directed at the town’s mayor.

Audience members expressed searing criticism of Ferguson’s governance and leadership, both of which have come under fire since one of the Ferguson's police officers shot and killed 18-year-old Michael Brown.

Jo Mannies/St. Louis Public Radio

Business was brisk Friday afternoon at the St. Louis County Election Board, where lines of people – most of them elderly --  were waiting to cast an absentee ballot for Tuesday’s primaries.

The line of people waiting to sign in stretched across the lobby of the board’s headquarters in Maplewood, and the parking lot directly outside was full much of the time. Some motorists had to wait for an open space.

This article originally appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - During almost two decades together in the Missouri General Assembly, Republican Mike Gibbons and Democrat Joan Bray agreed on little.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, June 20, 2011 - Former state Sen. Rita Days, D-Bel Nor, has been hired as St. Louis County's new Democratic elections director.

She plans to attend Tuesday's meeting of the county Election Board, where her selection is expected to announced.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, June 22, 2010 - As the state Legislature gathers Thursday for a special session, many of its members will be making their last mark on state government.

They are the dozens of term-limited legislators -- 52 in the House and 10 in the Senate -- who cannot run for re-election this fall.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, May 14, 2010 - A trio of women state senators made good Thursday night on their filibuster threat -- but the targeted bill wasn't what had been expected.

State Sens. Rita Days, D-Bel Nor; Joan Bray, D-University City; and Jolie Justus, D-Kansas City, led a four-hour filibuster that succeeded late Thursday in killing a bill sought by rural senators -- of both parties -- to block an initiative-petition measure restricting dog breeding in the state.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, March 25, 2010 State lawmakers engaged in a lively debate late into the evening Wednesday over a resolution calling for a constitutional amendment for Missourians to decide whether to opt out of federal health-reform legislation. A similar resolution already has cleared the House.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Jan. 11, 2010 - In his last year as House Speaker, Rod Jetton didn't care about what went on in the Missouri House.

That wasn't a matter of opinion. The Republican from Marble Hill, Mo., openly admitted that his dwindling time in elected office -- forced by Missouri's legislative term limits -- reduced his interest in the affairs of state.