River Des Peres | St. Louis Public Radio

River Des Peres

Dave Gullic, who works with the DNR's water quality monitoring section, nets a fish in Jefferson City's Binder Lake. The department samples fish tissues for mercury, as part of a monitoring process required by the EPA.
Missouri Department of Natural Resources

The Missouri Department of Natural Resources has identified a new batch of lakes and streams that do not meet water quality standards.

The state agency added 60 water bodies to this year’s draft list of impaired waters, including several in the greater St. Louis region. Many of the listed water bodies had high concentrations of bacteria or algae, often linked to runoff from cities, towns and farms.

Map of major watersheds in the St. Louis area.
Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District

The "cloud burst" that drenched a mid-section of St. Louis County with nearly four inches of rain early Monday morning is only part of why local streams and creeks swelled their banks, flooding businesses and several busy streets.

Forecasters called it a 25-year rain event, but similar flooding took place just eight months ago and to many county residents it's also reminiscent of flooding in 2008.

Volunteers Clean Up River Des Peres Watershed

Oct 19, 2014
Chris Weiss and John Koch load tires into a trailer at Gravois Creek near Grant's Trail on Saturday, October 18, 2014.
Camille Phillips/St. Louis Public Radio

As water flows south through the River des Peres Watershed in St. Louis, trash, tires and metal gets deposited along the way. Over the weekend, hundreds of volunteers worked to pick up all that trash during the sixth annual cleanup called the River des Peres Trash Bash.

At Gravois Creek on Saturday morning, about a dozen volunteers stacked muddy tires into a trailer hitched to a four-wheeler.

Earlier, volunteers had fished the tires out of the creek using canoes. By mid-morning, volunteer Doug Geist estimated that they had collected more than twenty tires.

Aging sewer system is a buried problem

Oct 25, 2011

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Oct. 25, 2011 - Two dozen feet below the joggers, dog walkers and artists painting picturesque still lifes on a clear, cool fall morning in Forest Park, Lance LeComb stands at the mouth of a darkened reinforced concrete tunnel backed by an opaque, mildly odiferous grayish-green stream flowing from toilets, showers and drains in thousands of St. Louis-area homes and businesses.

EPA issues decision on Mo. water quality standards

Aug 17, 2011
(via Flickr/pasa47)

The EPA today issued its decision on Missouri's water quality standards, approving how the state categorized 244 streams, rivers and lakes.

That decision means water bodies newly designated for high contact uses like swimming will need more protection.

Some sewage treatment plants, municipalities and others will need to start treating their wastewater discharges.