Science Education | St. Louis Public Radio

Science Education

Bee expert Nicole Miller-Struttmann was recently awarded the 2019 Science Educator Award by the St. Louis Academy of Science.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

The welfare of all sorts of insects has been garnering attention of late, with some disconcerting headlines about declining insect populations.

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jeremy D. Goodwin talked with a local scientist to learn more about what is happening and how humans can help bees and other insects thrive.

Considered one of the top bee experts in the U.S., Webster University biologist Nicole Miller-Struttmann annually heads up a summer Bee Blitz in Forest Park, where photo enthusiasts spread out for an afternoon of bee photography that helps scientists track the population of bee species.

Ben Routhier, 9, looks through a microscope for the first time during "Brain Discovery" class on September 19, 2018.
Shahla Farzan | St. Louis Public Radio

Ben Routhier never imagined brain cells could be so tiny.

As the 9-year-old squints through the eyepiece of a microscope for the first time, his exclamation echoes through the classroom.

“It’s like a whole bunch of black lines and black dots,” he murmurs, inspecting the preserved mouse neurons.

Routhier is part of a group of home-schooled students participating in “Brain Discovery,” an outreach program that aims to get kids excited about neuroscience. Washington University graduate students and researchers work closely with elementary students across the St. Louis region, using hands-on experiments to help them understand how the brain works.

Marlysha Tucker of River Roads Lutheran School connects a wire in order to program a computer to turn on an LED light during a Webster University cyber workshop Oct. 21, 2017.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

Webster University held a workshop Saturday to introduce middle school girls to computer science and cybersecurity, with a goal of encouraging them to pursue careers in the field.

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, less than 20 percent of the country’s cybersecurity analysts are women. The field is expected to grow rapidly in the next decade.

New St. Louis magnet school shows early promise

May 21, 2017
Students at Collegiate School of Medicine & Bioscience take two science classes a year.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

For the first time in more than a decade, the St. Louis public school district is celebrating the first graduating class of a new high school.

The Collegiate School of Medicine & Bioscience gave diplomas to 44 seniors Sunday.

While still too new to have much of a track record, Collegiate’s high standardized test scores help the highly selective magnet school stand out from a crowded field of science-themed schools in the city.

What needs to change about STEM education in the United States?
Dominick | Flickr

Does this sound familiar?

“Most students will tell you that the main job scientists have is to make things as complex and difficult as possible,” Norman Lederman told St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh.

Lederman, a distinguished professor of mathematics and science education at the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago, will speak in Fulton at Westminster College on Sept. 14 for the 2016 Hancock Symposium titled “Audacious Ingenuity: Pushing the Boundaries of Science.”

Third-grader Michael Scott launches his straw rocket at Boeing's free science and technology camp Saturday, July 16, 2016 at McClure South-Berkley High School.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

More than 300 students from age eight to 18 spent Saturday doing hands-on activities like building straw rockets and trying out a flight simulator at McClure South-Berkley High School in the Ferguson-Florissant School District.

The one-day, free summer camp sponsored by Boeing let kids explore science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics, known as STEAM.

This was the second year Boeing held the event in north St. Louis County. The company has been offering a similar one-day camp in the city of St. Louis since 2011.

Seven-year-old Phoenix Torno checks out his own reflection in the telescope's internal mirror, while his younger brother Bodhi tries to get in on the action.
Véronique LaCapra|St. Louis Public Radio file photo

Libraries throughout the St. Louis area will soon have more telescopes available for checkout.

The St. Louis Astronomical Society put 29 telescopes together over the weekend, bringing the total number of telescopes at area libraries to 88 by March 17.

Summer program at Harris-Stowe gives science students a boost

Jul 27, 2015
Kimon Chapman conducts an experiment in a chemistry class at Harris-Stowe's Academy for Science & Mathematics this summer.
Bob Morrison | Harris-Stowe State University

Some incoming freshmen at Harris-Stowe State University are getting their first taste of college life — and a crash course in math and science.

Every summer, the Academy for Science & Mathematics provides up to 25 students with free room and board and a $1000 stipend.