Southern Illinois University Edwardsville | St. Louis Public Radio

Southern Illinois University Edwardsville

Students cross Grand Boulevard on St. Louis University's campus Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2018.
File Photo | David Kovaluk | St. Louis Public Radio

Universities in the St. Louis region are releasing plans to return students back to campus this fall, but they come with a warning.

School administrators say they are prepared to shift instruction online and send students home like they did this spring if coronavirus cases again spike during the fall semester. Most plan to begin the school year with in-person learning while implementing social distancing measures on campus. 

The center of SIUE's campus without any students on March 30. The university asked all students move out of the dorms on March 21.
Eric Schmid | St Louis Public Radio

EDWARDSVILLE — College students should respond to the 2020 census as if they were still living on campus or in their off-campus apartment, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. The coronavirus outbreak has added confusion to this question because most college students are now back at home, finishing their semesters online. 

The decennial headcount tracks where people in the U.S. live and sleep most of the time. 

February 19, 2020 Diane Rehm Sarah Fenske
Howard Ash | Southern Illinois University Edwardsville Photographic Services

For three decades, Diane Rehm hosted a conversation with America. "The Diane Rehm Show" grew from a local show at NPR affiliate WAMU to a national juggernaut, with 2.8 million listeners every week. And even after her December 2016 retirement, Rehm has continued the conversation. She hosts a podcast; she also recently published her fourth book, “When My Time Comes.”

Earlier this week, in partnership with St. Louis on the Air, Rehm discussed her career at a dinner hosted by the Mannie Jackson Center for the Humanities Foundation at Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville. We aired highlights from that conversation on Friday’s St. Louis on the Air — which included Rehm’s thoughts on interviewing and advocacy for the “death with dignity” movement.   

Allegra Fuller Snyder, 91, is the only living child of the late architect and futurist R. Buckminster Fuller. She's also a professor emeritus of dance and dance ethnography at UCLA.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

For decades, R. Buckminster Fuller was known around the globe for his scholarship and his vision of a future that could work for everyone aboard what he described as “spaceship earth.” By the middle of the 20th century, he saw two possible destinations on humanity’s horizon – utopia or oblivion – and his lectures and writings still resonate today.

“He was always a step ahead of where the rest of us were, but very excited and eager to bring us all with him,” his 91-year-old daughter, Allegra Fuller Snyder, said Friday on St. Louis on the Air.

In town for what’s been billed as a “Bucky Weekend” celebrating the late architect’s legacy in the St. Louis region, she joined host Don Marsh for the conversation alongside Benjamin Lowder, creative director of the Fuller Dome at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville.

A former Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville student is suing the college for its handling of her on-campus sexual assault claim while she was a senior in October 2017.
Ryan Delaney | St. Louis Public Radio

A recent graduate of Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville is suing the school over the way it handled her allegation that another student sexually assaulted her.

In a federal lawsuit filed Tuesday, Bailey Reed claims the university mismanaged the investigation, intimidated her and obstructed her access to a quality education. SIUE has not filed a response to the lawsuit.

From left, Kelly Sopek, Julie Zimmermann and Payne Gray spoke with host Don Marsh about their recent anthropological work at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Long before Lewis and Clark passed through the Gateway to the West, this region was home to indigenous Americans including the Cahokians.

While this civilization was primarily located about 15 minutes east of St. Louis at today’s Cahokia Mounds State Historic Site, settlements were scattered across the region including the area that is now Edwardsville.

William Thomas, 18, of Chicago Heights, Illinois, fills out residential housing paperwork at a Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville freshman orientation on Friday, July 28, 2017.
File photo | Ryan Delaney | St. Louis Public Radio

Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville has morphed over the last decade from a commuter college into a regional university that attracts out-of-state students.

The secret to growing while other public universities and colleges across the state shrink: broadening recruitment efforts and constructing more dorms.

Students walk through the campus of Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville in the Spring of 2017.
SIUE

Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville is planning to boost salaries, launch new academic programs and continue renovating buildings thanks to lawmakers finally passing a state budget.

The school even expects to receive the $15 million it loaned the Carbondale campus by the end of August.

Head Start teaching assistant Shavonda Willis helps Jemez Jackson Harris IV close a bracelet he made to practice patterns June 23, 2017.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

Ordinarily Head Start teaching assistant Shavonda Willis would be on vacation during the summer. But this year she is spending six weeks at an East St. Louis elementary school teaching 5 and 6 year olds who’ve never been to preschool.

Southern Illinois University Edwardsville biology professor Danielle Lee examines a deer mouse with undergraduate student Jacquelyn Isom.
Eli Chen | St. Louis Public Radio

On a humid, mid-April morning, nearly a dozen students were scattered around a small field across the street from Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville. They planted pink flags, strung measuring tape up and down the field and used machetes to clear their way through tall, prickly prairie grasses.

“Did I tell you about the fox? A fox just ran past Danielle’s foot. Like, really!” exclaimed their professor, Danielle Lee, an animal biologist at SIUE.

The fox sighting is important, as Lee and her students are trying to find out what rodents and other animals live near the campus. Lee and other scientists who study urban ecology are just starting to discover the ways in which human development affects wildlife.

Lincoln School, the county's first public school for African Americansthe county's first public school for African Americans, prior to the construction of its new building in 1911 is one of many photos archived in Madison Historical.
Provided | Madison Historical and the Madison County Historical Society

Madison County has a new online archive that documents local history through century-old photographs, articles and recorded interviews.

The Madison Historical website produced by Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville invites exploration of the Metro East county’s history, sorting content by era (19th, 20th, or 21st century), theme (industry, education, government) and community.

Sina Nassiri and Mehrdad Alvandipour are Iranian students at Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville.
Eli Chen | St. Louis Public Radio

In August 2015, Mehrdad Alvandipour arrived in the United States from Iran to pursue graduate degrees in electrical engineering and mathematics at Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville.

“Basically, I love science,” he said. “That’s the reason I traveled here, to study at a good university and improve myself.”

Alvandipour hoped that studying at SIUE would put him on track to become a professor at an American university. But President Donald Trump’s executive order on immigration has him, and other international research students in the St. Louis region, worried about the future.

Provided by Southern Illinois University Edwardsville

Engineering researchers at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville are helping the Illinois Department of Transportation develop strategies for managing stormwater runoff on highways.

Highways and roads interrupt the natural flow of water during rains and especially heavy precipitation could cause much of the runoff to overload sewers. Runoff also can taint the water quality of the rivers and streams that it enters.

SIUE will build a new $105 million health sciences building. The money comes from the Rebuild Illinois capitol plan, passed by the state legislature last year.
(Wikimedia Commons)

Consider a student who may be weary of strict academic lectures and wants to see where all of this classroom learning is going to fit into the real world.

Then consider a business owner who wants to find new ideas and new energy but isn’t sure where to look.

A new cooperative program between Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville and Madison County hopes to match the expertise of academia with the needs of business and the community to make all sides stronger and more successful.

WSIE Logo
WSIE

Money problems are forcing a St. Louis-area jazz radio station to expand its format.

“We've not been able to monetize the jazz format so we've chosen to expand that a little bit by adding blues,” says Doug McIlhagga, the executive director of marketing and communications for Southern Illinois University - Edwardsville. The university runs WSIE, which started broadcasting in 1970.

Deer visit the SIU-Edwardsville campus.
Pete Burzynski | Flickr | 2007

The interim chancellor of Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville insists that his campus is financially strong and will not close because of the state’s budget stalemate.

But Stephen Hansen wrote to his colleagues at SIUE that he expects the political rhetoric between Gov. Bruce Rauner and lawmakers to escalate as the spending standoff moves toward a critical point.

Co-directors Cory Byers (left) and Ashley Seering film additional footage in a nursing lab at SIU-Edwardsville. "The Heroin Project" premieres May 3.
Durrie Bouscaren | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated on July 21 to add information about the film's screening as part of the St. Louis Filmmakers Showcase. The co-directors were guests on "St. Louis on the Air."

When Ashley Seering and Cory Byers started gathering stories about heroin addiction and deaths in southern Illinois, the Edwardsville-based filmmakers didn’t realize it would turn into a feature-length documentary.

An archway entrance to Saint Louis University
chuteme | Flickr | Creative Commons

Updated at 3:23 p.m. Mon., Feb. 17, with announcement of new SIU president. Some of the jobs came open suddenly, one at the end of a long campus standoff and still others quietly at the end of long, productive tenures, but they all have resulted in room at the top of the ivory tower:

At least four local schools – Saint Louis University, Harris-Stowe State University, St. Louis Community College and the Southern Illinois University system – have vacancies in the office of their top administrator or did until Monday, when SIU named a new president.

Legacy Of Katherine Dunham In Danger In East St. Louis

Oct 17, 2013
Erin WIlliams / St. Louis Public Radio

    

When Katherine Dunham - world dancer, former professor, and part-time East St. Louis resident - died in 2006, she made it a point to make sure that her legacy was remembered. She held workshops and gave personal instruction to other dancers on how to perform her flamboyant, graceful, Africa-influenced Dunham Technique; she wrote books, gave talks, and did interviews at length on overcoming racism and 

  discrimination while traveling the world with her troupe, the Katherine Dunham Company; and, most importantly, she oversaw the day-to-day operations of the Katherine Dunham Museum in East St. Louis, housed just across the street from the three homes she owned and occupied during her time in Illinois.

Unfortunately, memories can’t make money. And that’s what you need in order to run a museum.

Though the museum receives grants from time to time, there’s no trust or steady income, visits are by appointment only, and paying members of the museum are few. In fact, if you call the number listed on the website to book a tour, you get the cell phone of Laverne Backstrom, board president of the Katherine Dunham Centers for Arts and Humanities - and tour guide for the museum. Unlike the lights and the phone line at the museum, she can guarantee that her phone won’t be turned off.

“I think that her plan was by continuing to certify instructors, she then had these persons understand that they were more than dancers, that they were perpetuating a way of life, and it was the way that she thought that life ought to be lived,” says Backstrom, a retired schoolteacher.

Ideally, Dunham envisioned the museum as a bastion for artist to dance, make music, and learn about other cultures – and for the most part, that’s still happening.  The studio located in the backyard still serves as a place for instruction and weekly classes, and there’s still a yearly intensive held at Wash U every summer. If she were ever in financial trouble, Dunham could quickly call on friends like Harry Belafonte to help her cover costs. Her daughter, Marie-Christine, lives in France and leaves the day-to-day operations of the Museum in East St. Louis to the Board.

“You’re always subject to losing all of it. But you don’t think about that on a day to day basis. You continue to think where the next grant is going to come from or where the next resource might be,” says Backstrom. “I’m not going to be very effective screaming and yelling by myself that this is what needs to happen.”

(via Wikimedia Commons/Saluki wiki)

Reporting from WSIU's Jennifer Fuller.

Southern Illinois University's embattled Board of Trustees tried to meet again Wednesday, but the meeting ended abruptly when two members walked out - before a chairperson could be elected.

SIU Edwardsville student trustee David Hamilton made a motion to postpone the officer and committee chair nominations until a full board is seated.

"I cannot justify electing a Chairman when I'm the only representative from one of our major campuses," Hamilton said.

(Courtesy Madison County Sheriff’s Department)

Updated at 11:40 a.m. with a statement from prosecuting attorney Thomas Gibbons.

An Illinois appeals court has overturned the conviction of a Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville student charged with planning to threaten a mass shooting at the campus.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Feb. 12, 2013 - In a recent Beacon article on the heels of his 75th birthday celebration, poet, scholar and East St. Louis Poet Laureate Eugene Redmond talked about growing up in East St. Louis, the development of his poetry over the years, his work as a professor at California State University Sacramento and eventually Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, and his mentoring of young writers in East St. Louis.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Dec. 11, 2012 - James Langley, a second-year pharmacy student at Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville, didn’t quite know what to expect when he began helping to organize a hospice volunteer program.

One initial concern was whether the time and commitment needed would take away from his studies. The second concern was the thought of feeling helpless in the presence of a hospice patient when “it’s all going bad.”

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, June 4, 2012 - Four days of performing arts including puppets, masked actors and something called Squonk Opera is coming to our area. But it’s not the St. Lou Fringe -- that’s a couple of weeks away -- it’s the June 6-9 Xfest 3.0 at Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville.

A series of performances at Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts will blur the lines separating art, theater and social work to break down barriers among people and communities.

Courtesy of the Pulitzer

 

Emily Piro, case manager at St. Patrick Center, works with "Staging Reflections of the Buddha."

A series of performances at Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts will blur the lines separating art, theater and social work to break down barriers among people and communities.

Courtesy of the Pulitzer

 

Emily Piro, case manager at St. Patrick Center, works with "Staging Reflections of the Buddha."

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Oct. 26, 2011 - When classical pianist Vladimir Horowitz, who was known for his frequent "retirements," left St. Louis off his 1974-75 "comeback" tour, James Cain, then manager of the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra, flew to Columbus, Ohio, and cajoled the pianist into adding the city to his schedule.

Uncovering prehistory on the SIUE campus

Jul 7, 2011

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, July 7, 2011 - SIUE students learn by doing as they uncover effigy heads and flint stones on undeveloped parts of the campus. The Archeology Field School is uncovering the day-to-day life of people who lived in a farm village that traded with the big city of Cahokia about 1,000 years ago.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Jan. 14, 2011 - John Kendall, who taught violin at the college level for more than 50 years and who made "Suzuki" a household name in America, died Jan. 6 at Arbor Hospice in Ann Arbor, Mich., his home for the past five years. He died from complications of a stroke he suffered last November. He was 93.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, May 8, 2009 - First, classical music fans began worrying whether they would be losing their radio station. Now, jazz fans are fretting over the same concern.

WSIE, at 88.7 on the FM dial and known as the Jazz Station, operates out of the Edwardsville campus of Southern Illinois University. A campus committee, which convened to consider the future of the station, has turned its recommendations in to Chancellor Vaughn Vandegrift.

Pages