St. Louis Beacon archives

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - Americans who are paying off private student loans might find insights into their complicated monthly statements in a recent annual report published by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

Private loans have drawn the scrutiny of Rohit Chopra, the student loan ombudsman for the bureau, a federal agency established by Congress in 2010 to oversee the consumer financial industry.

Paul Strand; Village, Gaspé, 1936; Saint Louis Art Museum 73:1978; © Aperture Foundation Inc., Paul Strand Archive.
Courtesy of St. Louis Art Museum

This article originally appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - The new special prints and photography exhibit space in St. Louis Art Museum’s Cass Gilbert building has already proved a great boon for the museum. It was truly sad to see the galleries’ inaugural exhibit, Mantegna to Man Ray, come down. But our farewell to curator Elizabeth Wyckoff’s assemblage of cross hatching splendor is followed by yet another spectacular exhibit.

The Weight of Things: Photographs by Paul Strand and Emmet Gowin provides another delightful display of rare and exceptional work available to our eyes for only a brief period.

This article originally appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - The Senate Banking Committee, in a 14-8 vote, recently sent to the full Senate, President Barack Obama’s nominee to become the next chair of the Federal Reserve Board of Governors. With the change in filibuster rules, Janet Yellen’s confirmation is a near certainty.

Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Beacon | 2013

This article originally appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - The Missouri Association for Social Welfare is challenging the ballot summary language for a proposal to increase the state’s sales tax for transportation projects.

The group announced Monday  that it had filed a lawsuit in Cole County Circuit Court challenging Secretary of State Jason Kander’s ballot summary for a constitutional amendment instituting a 10-year, 1-cent sales tax increase for transportation.

Immigrants rally in Kirkwood to push for congressional passage of legislation.
Jo Mannies | St. Louis Beacon | 2013

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - After 19 years in the United States, some of it as an undocumented Hispanic immigrant, Norma Andrade succeeded three weeks ago in completing the process to become a U.S. citizen.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon’s plan called for a meeting this week with legislators to discuss Medicaid expansion as part of an apparent focus on health care as the General Assembly prepares to go back into session in six weeks.

The meeting now appears dead, the casualty of a dispute between the governor and two legislative committees over who would control the proceedings.

This article originally appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - When Better Together, a group tasked with studying a potential reunion between St. Louis and St. Louis County, launched last week, there was a lot of talk about the “lines” dividing the region.

Mayor Francis Slay said that few people cared if they “were crossing the line” while staying in the Cheshire Inn, a hotel straddling the city-county border. But, he later said, “the line does exist and many other lines exist as well.”

Anyta Wilson works with students at the St. Louis Art Museum.
Nancy Fowler | St. Louis Beacon | 2013

This article originally appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - “When you look at me, what do you see?” Anti-Defamation League program training facilitator Anyta Wilson asked a group of mostly white sixth-graders at the St. Louis Art Museum this past Tuesday.

“Girl.” “Long hair.” “Dreads.”

Accurate, yes, but Wilson pressed on: “What color am I?”

“Brown,” several replied, as Wilson nodded.

Around the world in 14 months -- on bicycle

Nov 25, 2013
Sophie Binder bicycles in Laos. (300 pixels)
Provided by Ms. Binder

This article originally appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - There’s something thrilling about a solitary adventurer, roaming the lonely places of the world with a light pack and the ability to drift in and out of cultures and borders on a whim. While millions of us sit in cubicles, staring longingly at the vibrant Italy! calendar or battered postcard from Thailand pinned to the wall, it is satisfying to know that Someone is out there exploring.

Commentary: Hard lessons from the ACA roll-out

Nov 25, 2013

This article originally appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - As a professor of public policy I am always on the lookout for events that I can use as Teachable Moments in the classroom. The rollout of the Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare, certainly qualifies as a case study of what not to do when implementing a new public policy.

(File images)

During the University of Missouri Board of Curators' two-day meeting at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, the board unanimously approved the merger of the non-profit news organizations St. Louis Public Radio and the St. Louis Beacon, which is expected to be completed next month.

Leadership at both organizations has been planning the merger for more than a year.

St. Louis Public Radio’s license is held by the University of Missouri Curators, and the merger required the board’s approval.

Charlie Dooley
Provided by Mr. Dooley

This article originally appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - Former state House Speaker Steve Tilley, R-Perryville, and prominent St. Louis businessman Doug Albrecht were among the top Republicans who headlined an event in Clayton on Thursday to raise money for St. Louis County Executive Charlie Dooley, a Democrat under siege from some within his own party.

Robert H. Quenon
Provided | St. Louis Beacon | 2013

Robert H. Quenon wanted to become a coal mining manager like his father and his father’s three brothers.

“I was counseled by them that if management was my objective, I should get as much practical experience as possible by working underground and learning the fundamentals of how coal is mined and how coal miners think and behave,” Mr. Quenon told a college audience as he neared retirement.

This article originally appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - The television room in the fraternity house was often crowded and clamorous, filled with cheers and jeers while the brothers on the couches and the NFL teams on the screen battled. In this searing moment, though, the packed room was stunningly quiet -- just like on the evening of Oct. 22, 1962, when President Kennedy solemnly announced he was mobilizing our military to repel the Soviet installation of nuclear-armed missiles in Cuba and implicitly raised the specter of Armageddon.

Montez Coleman and Tony Suggs have stayed connected since they both started playing in Lincoln High’s jazz program in East St. Louis.
Terry Perkins | St. Louis Beacon | 2013

This article originally appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - Drummer Montez Coleman and pianist Tony Suggs first met in fall, 1988, when both were members of the East St. Louis Lincoln High School Jazz Band.

Twenty-five years later, Coleman and Suggs have carved out successful careers as professional jazz musicians. And even though Suggs makes his home half a world away in Japan, the two remain close friends – and continue to pursue opportunities to play jazz together.

This article originally appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - Dear Beaconites,

Today, we celebrate the merger of the Beacon and St. Louis Public Radio. Our new organization will serve our fellow St. Louisans with facts and fairness. We'll not only report what happens but also explore why, so what and what's next. We believe our work can help light the way to a better region.

President John F. Kennedy
White House photo

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - Among the tributes to former President John F. Kennedy on this 50th anniversary year of his assassination is a website that helps visitors connect the dots to show ways in which the flame of optimism lit by the young president still burns in our time. He was assassinated in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963, at age 46. Visitors are able to express their thoughts on the Kennedy legacy by sending tweets and uploading text, photos and videos to the website, called “An Idea Lives On.”

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - Listen, Sarah Palin is mad as hell and she’s not going to take it anymore. At least, that’s the impression I got from news reports surrounding the roll-out of her latest intellectual treatise, “Good Tidings and Great Joy: Protecting the Heart of Christmas.”

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - Undergraduate resident tuition for the 2014-15 academic year at the four campuses of the University of Missouri system would rise 1.7 percent, the national inflation rate, under projections presented to the system’s Board of Curators on Thursday.

This article originally appeared the St. Louis Beacon. - The rocky rollout of the Affordable Care Act's insurance marketplace apparently hasn’t changed the level of consumer support for the health-reform program. For weeks, administration officials and policy analysts have been concerned that many people were confused about the law and might be turned off because of difficulties buying insurance through the insurance exchange.

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