St. Louis Beacon archives

This article originally appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - The Rev. Ben Martin was against the war in Iraq, both of them, torture, the death penalty and any policy that made life more difficult for everyday people. Without hesitation and unstintingly, for more than six decades, he raised his voice for social and racial justice.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - Every morning when I wake up, the first thing I do is reach for my phone and check my email and my Facebook notifications. If there are no notifications and no children needing breakfast, I peruse my Facebook feed.

This article originally appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - To become a world champion one has to be dedicated to a lifetime of hard work.

The World Championship match is usually organized once every two-three years and lasts about a month, yet it is always amazing to see all this endless work, an entire life’s worth of efforts and years of preparation, put toward a single match that can be decided in less than 24 hours, and in no more than two moves.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - The passing of sex researcher Virginia Johnson the last week of July at the age of 88 in St. Louis (and the Showtime series) brought back a remarkable experience my wife and I had at the famous Masters and Johnson clinic.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - It’s almost become a bit cliche. When neighborhoods begin the rebound process, a business that helps in the transition is the local coffeehouse. Any urban blog will tell you the same: A coffeehouse is one of the harbingers of good things to come, especially when run independently. When the chains come’a’callin’, the transition’s complete and the neighborhood’s well down the road to gentrification, with all the good and bad that comes with that term.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - From lust to anger, the color red evokes a hotbed of emotions. Its vibrancy also figures prominently in popular cultural, with movies such as “The Woman in Red” and songs including “99 Red Balloons.” Now red is the subject of an art exhibit in the Teaching Gallery of the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum on the Washington University campus.

Kristina Van Dyke has old and new in her Lafayette Square carriage house.
Jarred Gastreich | St. Louis Beacon | 2013

This article originally appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - Art and science often seem to exist on opposite ends of a spectrum bookended by the likes of Georgia O’Keeffe and George Washington Carver. But for Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts director Kristina Van Dyke, the two worlds collide in an art collection inspired by archeology, geology and even radiology.

This article originally appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - Missouri’s two U.S. senators – Democrat Claire McCaskill and Republican Roy Blunt – disagree on many issues, such as the Affordable Care Act.  But the two are finding themselves on the same side on a number of military matters, including how best to address sexual assault.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - The passing of sex researcher Virginia Johnson the last week of July at the age of 88 in St. Louis (and the Showtime series) brought back a remarkable experience my wife and I had at the famous Masters and Johnson clinic.

No, it wasn’t sex therapy we needed but a baby; and we couldn’t have one. So in 1968, after a year of trying to conceive, we went to their Reproductive Biology Research Lab, which should be just as famous but is not. It was something of a sexual/scientific experience nonetheless.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - As superintendent of the Riverview Gardens School District since July 1, Scott Spurgeon has an array of facts and figures, plans and practices that he says can help the district regain accreditation.

But, he told a hearing called by the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Wednesday night, he also has one solid indicator that things are looking up.

Cindy Shuford and her daughter
Provided by the family

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - Cindy Shuford of Washington, Ill., was at church Sunday when word came that a tornado was fast approaching. Taking cover in one of the building’s windowless rooms, Shuford first thought of her 22-year-old daughter, working the deli counter at Kroger.

“I just kept thinking of her, and I wanted to see her face,” Shuford said, in a telephone interview.

Gov. Jay Nixon says there's a distinction between a gas tax increase and "trying to get some sort n between a gas tax increase and as being different "than trying to get some sort of generalized additional revenue."
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio | File photo

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - The anticipated meeting next week between Gov. Jay Nixon and top legislative leaders, to discuss health care and Medicaid, may be on the ropes as a result of a dispute over how and where the session would proceed.

"At this point, the meeting has been cancelled,'' said state Sen. Gary Romine, R-Farmington, adding that he was taken aback by the governor's angry response to the legislators' conditions for the meeting.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - The chief executives of St. Louis and St. Louis County helped kickstart an endeavor to gather data -- and public input -- that could lead to a potential reunion of the two jurisdictions.

Art McCoy
File copy | Ferguson-Florissant website

This article originally appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - Missouri school officials say they are investigating "potential irregularities in mandatory reporting including district attendance" in the Ferguson-Florissant school district.

Information from the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education was released following word from the district's school board that it had “serious” new information about suspended Superintendent Art McCoy that it is referring to state education officials.

Joe Edwards outside Blueberry Hill
File Photo | Jarred Gastreich | Beacon

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - If you don’t know who Joe Edwards is, you probably haven’t lived in St. Louis for long. Owner of Blueberry Hill; friend of Chuck Berry; driving force behind local standbys like the Pageant, the Pin-Up Bowl, the Flamingo Bowl and the Moonrise Hotel (all of which make him unofficial mayor of the Delmar Loop); connoisseur of Hawaiian shirts: These things help describe Joe Edwards.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - Too often today when people look at paintings that are more than 100 years old, they don't consider the story the artist was telling.

"Story is everything to many of the works of art in the Vatican Museums," the Rev. Mark Haydu said. His job – international director of the Patrons of the Arts in the Vatican Museums -- is raising funds to restore and maintain the Vatican vast art collections.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - In recent years, various officials and civic denizens have debated changes to governmental organization in St. Louis. Beginning in 1949, there have been efforts to streamline the table of organization and end a weak mayor system. Major charter changes put before the voters all failed, save one. And we’ll get to that in a little bit. Other changes occurred because of state legislative action or referenda.

This article originally appeared in the St. Louis Beacon - Some words and names are unsayable, or at least rarely said, because they are powerful. This poem hinges on such a word uttered on rare occasions, and the fact that it is used so rarely gives it all the more power, especially if the word is returned. 

Jeremy Scahill
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Beacon | 2013

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - Jeremy Scahill has made a career out of shattering conventional wisdom – whether it is the “official” version of what's happened in a warzone or the presiding opinion among journalists in Washington, D.C.

As the keynote speaker at “Ethics of Politics and the Press,” a conference at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, Scahill had one crucial piece of advice: Being there is essential to good journalism.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - Fall is upon us, with winter quick on its heels. As temperatures drop and the days get shorter, many of us will bundle up and hustle out to our cars after work, eager to get home to our families, go holiday shopping, or attend parties. We have all begun to face shorter days, overcast skies, wind and precipitation as we travel to our destinations. Weather-related incidents make up 24 percent of all crashes and 17 percent of crash fatalities; so a greater awareness of people on bike and foot is essential to ensure everyone’s comfort and safety through the winter season.

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