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St. Louis Metropolitan Police

Protest at Shaw and Klemm 10-8-14 re Vonderrit Myers
Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio

The St. Louis circuit attorney is pledging a thorough and transparent investigation into the shooting death of 18-year-old Vonderrit Myers. Myers was shot and killed Wednesday night in the Shaw neighborhood of St. Louis by an off-duty police officer.

A crowd gathers at Klemm Street and Shaw Boulevard at the scene of the fatal shooting Wednesday night.
Rachel Lippmann I St. Louis Public Radio

Updated at 1:40 p.m. with additional information.

A St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department officer working a second job with a private security company shot and killed a young black man, 18-year-old VonDerrit Myers Jr. The incident happened in the Shaw neighborhood in south St. Louis Wednesday night and drew a tense crowd that shouted at police and beat on their cruisers.

Ald. Joe Vaccaro (in yellow) examines a body camera during a meeting of the St. Louis Ways and Means committee. The city's public safety department hopes to purchase 1,000 of the cameras, at a price tag of $1.2 million.
Rachel Lippmann | St. Louis Public Radio

The union representing St. Louis police officers is raising questions about the proposed $1.2 million price tag for body cameras for the department.

Video provided by St. Louis Metropolitan Police

Updated at 5:15 p.m. with comments from Chief Sam Dotson, Jeff Roorda, and Ald. Dionne Flowers.

On Tuesday, two officers from the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department shot and killed Kajieme Powell, who was 25 years old.

Dotson: Overall Crime Down, Hot-Spot Policing Working

Jul 30, 2014
File photo | St. Louis Public Radio

Like many cities around the country, St. Louis is dealing with the ongoing problem of urban crime. Just over half-way through the year, St. Louis Metropolitan Police Chief Sam Dotson says overall crime is down over 11 percent, and violent crime is down almost 6 percent. Overall crime in the city is down almost 50 percent since 2006.

“We have many fewer crimes now than we did just five years ago,” Dotson said Wednesday. With one noticeable exception.

St. Louis Police March To New Headquarters

Jul 19, 2014
Camille Phillips/St. Louis Public Radio

After almost five years of preparation, the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department celebrated its move to new headquarters at 1915 Olive St. with a ceremonial march and ribbon-cutting Saturday.

Because the former headquarters at 1200 Clark Ave. needed $70 million in repairs, the department opted to find a new building instead. The former A.G. Edwards building was purchased in 2011 using $2.7 million in asset forfeiture funds, and the St. Louis Police Foundation contributed $3 million for renovations.

(St. Louis Public Radio)

A second St. Louis judge has ruled that police officers have no right to expect that statements they make during internal investigations won’t be released to the public.

(via Flickr/Tyson Blanquart)

Fair St. Louis’s move to Forest Park this year is presenting the St. Louis Police Department with some unique challenges. That's according to police chief Sam Dotson, who expressed his concerns at a police board hearing Thursday. 

This is the first time the annual Fourth of July celebration will take place in the city's largest park. Dotson said the logistics of the fair have taken more time than he would like.  But he said it's important to make sure the plan to keep everyone safe is airtight, especially this first year.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

St. Louis police said last month’s decision to dedicate additional resources to the Wells-Goodfellow neighborhood on the city's northwest side is paying off.

Since designating the area as a "hot spot," police have made nearly 90 arrests. Some were for probation and parole violations, others for crimes in progress. They also pulled 20 guns off the street during the 10-day period.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

The Wells-Goodfellow neighborhood, on the city's northwest side, will get some extra attention from the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department for the next week. 

File photo | St. Louis Public Radio

A video that shows two St. Louis police department officers striking a man has once again put the spotlight on the fraught interaction between police and the mentally ill.

The man, Mario Crump, has a history of mental illness. His family had called police for assistance because he was acting erratically. It’s not clear what happened before and after the 40-second video, which was shot by a family member. The incident happened March 21 at Crump's house in the 4300 block of Lee.

(Credit: Flickr/Brad Tutterow)

The St. Patrick's Day Parade marked the first time the Missouri State Highway Patrol and the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department relied on a single, statewide radio network to communicate with each other. And, according to all parties, the experience was a success.

(St. Louis Metropolitan Police)

Since 1962, the city of St. Louis has, by state law, had nine police districts.

Reducing that number has been a priority of St. Louis Metropolitan Police Chief Sam Dotson since he took the job last January. In April, voters turned control of the police department back to the city, giving Dotson the authority to make that change - one he said made based on the data.

Since 4:00 a.m. today, officers have been patrolling in six districts instead of nine.

Flickr | alancleaver_2000

Updated at 4:30 p.m. with quotes from Chief Sam Dotson and 2013 neighborhood data.

Despite an increase in the number of homicides, crime was down more than 5 percent overall in the city of St. Louis last year.

The St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department released its final numbers for 2013 today. Violent crimes — those committed against individuals— were down by more than 10 percent, while property crimes dropped more than 4 percent.

St. Louis Police Chief Sam Dotson (L) and St. Louis Circut Attorney Jennifer Joyce look on as St. Louis Fire Chief Dennis Jenkerson talks to reporters about the city's "no refusal" policy with drunk drivers. Prosecutors will now seek warrants to draw bloo
Bill Greenblatt/UPI

The end of state control of the St. Louis Police Department was literally centuries in the making. But St. Louis Police Chief Sam Dotson said the change hasn’t been obvious to city residents. 

  

And that, he said, is a good thing.

“Local control has been a significant step for the metropolitan police department,” Dotson said. “And really, you haven’t noticed anything. It’s been seamless and transparent like it was supposed to be.”

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio and the Beacon)

The technology available to a police officer on the beat has come a long way from a pen and a notebook.

Thanks to in-car computers, police now have the internet and sophisticated databases at their fingertips. Cameras can find a specific license plate or reduce the need for eyewitnesses.

But the speed at which the changes are taking place has even those using the technology concerned.

As a narcotics officer in Jefferson County in the mid-1990s, Jeff Roorda was a rock star when he got a bag phone

(St. Louis Public Radio)

A long-running legal battle over whether records of  internal St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department investigations are subject to Missouri's Sunshine Law will continue for possibly another six months.

Here's a timeline of the case:

John R Kahrhoff / IBEW Local 1

A local union is protesting a sub-contractor working on St. Louis’ new police headquarters.  Local 1 of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers opposes Thomas Ruzicka who has been convicted of embezzling more than $100,000 from former employees.

The union's business manager Frank Jacobs says Ruzicka is a license holder for R E Contracting that is handling about $1.2 million worth of electrical work for the downtown building. 

(via Flickr/raleighwoman)

Though crime overall continues to drop in the city of St. Louis, the city’s police department remains concerned about an ongoing spike in car break-ins .

Larcenies are up 2 percent across the city compared to last year, driven by a 7.5 percent jump in car break-ins across the same period.

Read the complete crime report here.

Flickr | alancleaver_2000

It’s been a good first six months on the job for St. Louis Metropolitan Police chief Sam Dotson when it comes to crime numbers.

Compared to the same period last year, overall crime in the city is down more than 7 percent in the first half of 2013. Crimes against persons, like homicides and assaults, are down 20 percent. And most crimes are trending well below five-year averages, though Dotson says he is concerned about an uptick in burglaries in recent weeks.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

The bomb and arson units in St. Louis city and County are joining forces on July 1 - the latest merger between the two largest police departments in the region.

The 10 officers will still be employees of their own departments, but will now respond to calls throughout the region in two, eight-hour shifts. The arrangement, said St. Louis city police chief Sam Dotson, should almost eliminate overtime costs.

(Provided/St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department)

Updated with receipt of statement from SLPS.

A math teacher at Soldan International Studies High School in St. Louis is facing 11 criminal counts for allegedly having sexual contact with a student at the school.

Thirty-two-year-old David Marler is being held on a $250,000 cash bond on felony statutory sodomy, child endangerment, and sexual contact with a student charges. Police are investigating the possibility that there were other victims, and are encouraging parents or students to call 314-444-5385.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Oct. 18, 2012 - After 151 years of state control of the St. Louis police department, advocates of local control have finally got a statewide measure on the Nov. 6 ballot that asks voters to allow St. Louis City Hall to take over.

But the final pitch for Proposition A will be targeted: No TV ads, but some radio spots and ads placed in regional newspapers around the state; and lots of reliance on the support of several dozen groups and more than 300 elected officials, business people and civic leaders around the state.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Oct. 16, 2012 - Big changes are in store for the St. Louis Police Department. It's getting a new chief and, if a statewide vote goes as expected next month, it will change from a state-controlled agency to one controlled by the mayor.

But for now, the Board of Police Commissioners, in perhaps its final major decision before becoming extinct, will select a successor to Chief Dan Isom.  Isom recently announced he is leaving the department at the end of the year to join the faculty of the criminology department at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. Isom has a bachelor's, master's and Ph.D. degrees from UMSL.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Oct. 10, 2012 -The St. Louis Police Officers Association's president is going public with his opposition to Proposition A, the statewide proposal to return control of the police department to City Hall, ending 150 years under state oversight.

But the association's business manager, Jeff Roorda, says the group's executive board remains on board in support of the proposal. Roorda said a special meeting will be called within a week to "resolve our differences."

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Nov. 10 2011 - The St. Louis Police Officers Association is announcing a deal that will result in a dramatic change in an initiative-petition effort aimed at persuading voters in 2012 to give St. Louis control of its police department.

Under the agreement, a campaign group funded by financier Rex Sinquefield will drop its five proposals for an initiative petition -- already cleared for distribution -- that would have changed the state constitution to transfer control to the city.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, May 10, 2011 - The Missouri Senate appears on the verge of approving a measure to end 150 years of state control of the St. Louis police department.

Senators debated the particulars at length Monday and have sent the bill to the fiscal oversight panel for the standard review.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, July 9, 2010 - The St. Louis Board of Aldermen is asking the city's voters to express their views on state control of the city's Police Department, which hails back to the Civil War.

The board approved today a ballot proposal to put the question on the Nov. 2 ballot. The proposal reads as follows:

Commentary: Dead man talking

May 27, 2010

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, May 27, 2010 - Thursday, May 20, dawned in gloomy fashion. Low-flying clouds pelted pedestrians with a steady rain while they fought to maintain control of their umbrellas against gusty winds. Chilly and dark, the morning's weather was appropriately dismal for the sad task of remembering the 163 St. Louis police officers who have given their lives in line of duty.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, May 13, 2010 - Achieving racial diversity has become a goal for many local police departments -- and not because of political correctness. Increasingly the departments recognize that having a mix of officers enables them to be more responsive and build better relationships with the surrounding community.

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