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St. Louis Public Radio

Joining Tuesday's talk show were (from left) Angela Louis, Lisa Picker and state Sen. Jill Schupp.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

The U.S. remains the only industrialized country that does not provide some form of universal paid family leave. Many American workers continue to have to choose between maintaining their livelihood and caring for loved ones.

There is some momentum in Congress to potentially change that, and meanwhile policy varies widely at the state and employer levels. In the St. Louis region, some organizations are recognizing the positive impact that paid family leave can have, and that trend is the focus of a free Tuesday evening panel titled The Future of Family Leave.

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, St. Louis Public Radio editor Holly Edgell talked with several guests who are participants in that event: Angela Louis, director of administration for Simon Law Firm; Lisa Weingarth, executive director of the Women’s Foundation of Greater St. Louis; and Missouri Sen. Jill Schupp (D-Creve Coeur).

Don Marsh resigned suddenly last month from his longtime postition as host of St. Louis on the Air.
File photo | David Kovaluk | St. Louis Public Radio

Don Marsh, the longtime host of St. Louis Public Radio's talk show, resigned after his managers challenged him on at least three occasions about his comments regarding women.

Marsh acknowledges that he has said things that others consider inappropriate, but he doesn't think he has done anything improper.

The veteran journalist’s departure has caused a stir in St. Louis, where many listeners of St. Louis on the Air have expressed outrage that the station did not try to keep him, and Marsh said he is the victim of an overly sensitive staff. The episode points to the changing standards in an evolving workplace.

Driemeier started at UMSL in 1965. He retired in 2004.
UMSL

A St. Louis Public Radio founder and longtime University of Missouri-St. Louis administrator has died.

Donald Driemeier identified the need for a public radio station for the region in 1971. St. Louis Public Radio signed on about a year later, under its call letters K-W-M-U. He wrote the construction permit for the station, which was based on UMSL’s campus for years.

Monday marks the five-year anniversary of the merger between St. Louis Public Radio and the St. Louis Beacon.

Collectively known as St. Louis Public Radio, the alliance of the two organizations was a bold move that increased the capacity for more journalists to tell more local and regional news stories.

People gather in the Central West End to protest the acquittal of former police officer Jason Stockley in September.
File photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

In the last week of 2017, St. Louis Public Radio is looking back at more than 1,500 stories that the newsroom covered over the past 12 months.

It was a year of big changes: a new president, a new governor and a new mayor in St. Louis. Our reporters reflected on those transitions and explored how national news was relevant to the St. Louis region.

Our readers certainly don’t have tunnel vision: The stories they shared covered science, legislature, race, the death penalty, and mental health. Readers saw our reporters follow unions as they mobilized to block a state law, travel to the southern Illinois towns at the Dakota Access Pipeline’s conclusion, and observe the Stockley protests that unsettled the region.

Avian Flores, Racheal Byenga and Malik Davidson look up at the eclipse at Long International Middle School in St. Louis.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Like many of you, the St. Louis Public Radio newsroom has been through a tumultuous year.

From the intense community reaction to the policies of President Donald Trump, to the excitement over a solar eclipse and expressions of outrage following a judge’s decision to acquit a white, former St. Louis police officer in the death of Anthony Lamar Smith — the year brought a wealth of news.

Here's what our editors considered among the year's most notable stories:

St. Louis Public Radio reporters and staffers are embarking on an initiative to hear about what matters to you. Join us Aug. 4 at Ferguson Public Library, our first stop, from 3-6 p.m.
Jay Morrison | Flickr | http://bit.ly/2au48SN

As a St. Louis news organization, we often hear that we’re not getting things right. We aren’t talking about the things that matter to you — and if we are, we’re missing important details, people, places and things. We want to do better. We need your help to start.

After all, our station’s motto is “News that Matters.” Maybe what we should be saying, too, is “news that matters to you.”

Newcomers Reflect On Their First Months In St. Louis

Dec 31, 2014
From  left, Stephanie Lecci, Willis Ryder Arnold, Emanuele Berry, Durrie Bouscaren. Wayne Pratt was not available for this photo.
St. Louis Public Radio

This summer, the newsroom of St. Louis Public Radio hired five people who had never lived in St. Louis. As 2014 draws to a close, we asked each to reflect on what they've discovered in their five months here.

Steve Stenger, Democrat, left, and Rick Stream, Republican, are running for St. Louis County executive.
Photos courtesy of the candidates

St. Louis County executive candidates Steve Stenger and Rick Stream will face off in a public debate Oct. 14 hosted by St. Louis Public Radio in partnership with the University of Missouri–St. Louis. It is the first planned debate ahead of the Nov. 4 election.

Emanuele Berry
Provided by Berry

St. Louis Public Radio is pleased to announce that four new voices are joining the journalistic team.

Starting today is Emanuele Berry, who is coming to St. Louis from East Lansing, Mich. Berry will be the second person to hold a fellowship that centers around regional race matters, as well as diversity and culture. Her predecessor, Erin Williams, is now with WMUK , Kalamazoo, Mich.

file photo

Yesterday, St. Louis Public Radio and the St. Louis Beacon became one. We’ve kept you up to date throughout the merger process. But now that the merger is complete, we wanted to take the opportunity to answer your questions.

Director and General Manager Tim Eby, formerly general manager of St. Louis Public Radio, and Editor Margaret Wolf Freivogel, founder of the Beacon, responded to your queries and commented about their vision for the merged organization.

Why merge?

(File images)

During the University of Missouri Board of Curators' two-day meeting at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, the board unanimously approved the merger of the non-profit news organizations St. Louis Public Radio and the St. Louis Beacon, which is expected to be completed next month.

Leadership at both organizations has been planning the merger for more than a year.

St. Louis Public Radio’s license is held by the University of Missouri Curators, and the merger required the board’s approval.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Sept. 26, 2013 - Dear Beaconites --

After more than a year of planning together, St. Louis Public Radio and the St. Louis Beacon are in the final stages of moving toward a merger. Approval could come as soon as November. That's when the University of Missouri Board of Curators, the governing body for the radio station, expects to take up the matter.

Editor's weekly: St. Louis Public Radio and the Beacon in the news

Jul 16, 2013

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, July 16, 2013 - St. Louisans have known since last October that St. Louis Public Radio and the St. Louis Beacon are exploring a merger. Now, it's nice to see the idea get national attention.

(Kelsey Proud/St. Louis Public Radio)

Will be updated with the audio of the discussion with Eby following the program.

As we announced earlier this week, St. Louis Public Radio's programming schedule will be changing in several ways soon, beginning on July 1.

Don Marsh speaks with St. Louis Public Radio Director and General Manager Tim Eby today about the changes. 

(St. Louis Public Radio file photo)

Our Bob McCabe will be leaving and taking his trademark slippers with him on Friday as he retires after almost 25 years at St. Louis Public Radio.

We've all loved working with Bob and will miss him tremendously - as we're sure many of you will miss hearing him each weekday morning.

We spoke with Bob on St. Louis on the Air:


Here's a little video tribute to Bob our Spencer Reed put together. We hope you enjoy it and join us in wishing Bob, our "radio man," the very best:

Editor's Weekly: First steps on a promising path

Oct 5, 2012

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Oct. 5, 2012 - Dear Beaconites -- Today's announcement that St. Louis Public Radio and the Beacon are exploring a formal alliance marks a milestone in the lives of our two organizations. But what matters more than the internal organizational significance is the promise this news holds for the people we serve -- you and our region.

A warm time lapse welcome from the St. Louis Beacon

Jun 18, 2012

Check out this handiwork by Brent Jones of The St. Louis Beacon, one of our new neighbors in Grand Center. It's a time lapse video, as they say, 1 year in 1.5 minutes, and shows our building from groundbreaking to how it is today.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, May 23, 2012 - For a little while, St. Louis Public Radio’s emerging building on Olive Street was easy to spot. But the bright red outer walls have been covered with black,  making the building feel more like a giant, angular speaker, which seems appropriate. 

Tim Eby, general manager, says the station's plan for now is to move from its home on the campus of the University of Missouri-St. Louis by Father’s Day and to air from there the following Monday.

St. Louis Public Radio breaks ground on new facility

Apr 15, 2011

St. Louis Public Radio and the University of Missouri-St. Louis broke ground on a new midtown facility at Grand Center today.

The new St. Louis Public Radio is being built on a parking lot currently being used by the Fox Theater.

(Chiodini Associates, architects, and AxiOme, design consultant)

Want to see more images of the new building's design? Check out a full gallery on Posterous.

Groundbreaking has been set for St. Louis Public Radio and the University of Missouri-St. Louis’ new home in Grand Center.

The public radio station’s general manager, Tim Eby, confirms that work will begin on the site just east of KETC public television on Friday, April 15. The three-story, 27,000-square-foot building is expected to take one year to complete.

Public broadcasting and all money considered

Mar 30, 2011

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, March 30, 2011 - Even with all the back and forth in Washington, Greg Conroy doesn't have to worry about public funding of his media organization. WSIE, the Southern Illinois University Edwardsville station where he is interim director, has a 0.8 market share and tiny staff. Because of that, the station fell out of the federal funding pool a few years ago.

Classical listeners turn to HD

Aug 3, 2010

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Aug. 3, 2010 - After St. Louis' longest running radio station, KFUO-FM "Classic99" changed format in early July, classical music lovers bemoaned the loss of their beloved station. But thanks to St. Louis Public Radio (KWMU 90.7 FM), classical radio is still available in St. Louis -- with a twist.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, July 28, 2010 - Missouri's budget shortfall has been felt everywhere from schools to state agencies to social service programs. Arts groups across St. Louis haven't been spared, either. Many are adjusting to the new reality of decreasing financial support from the state at a time when resources remain tight.

St. Louis Symphony hits the airwaves for summer

May 6, 2009

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, May 6, 2009 - On Saturday, May 9, you could get dressed up and head to Powell Hall to hear the St. Louis Symphony perform their season finale.

But you better have your tickets already.

If not, just turn on your radio for a live broadcast. Symphony broadcasts are "especially good this time since the finale of the season is sold out," says Eddie Silva, publications manager with the symphony.