St. Louis Surge | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis Surge

Mathews-Dickey Boys' & Girls' Club started out as a baseball program with two neighborhood coaches. The club provided an outlet for young African American children from impoverished neighborhoods in St. Louis.
Mathews-Dickey Boys' & Girls' Club

When the St. Louis Rams football team moved to the city from Los Angeles in 1995, it did not have a practice field. Shortly after a deal with the Mathews-Dickey Boys’ & Girls’ Club, the team had a facility where players could train.

Former NFL player Brandon Williams, 35, did not have to wait until he was drafted into the league to meet some of his favorite players. He was 11 years old and on the club’s field on North Kingshighway playing catch with a few Rams players like Toby Wright, Ryan McNeil and Hall of Famer Jerome Bettis.

Khalia Collier in her office at the St. Louis Surge. Collier is owner and general manager of the women's basketball team.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Women make up just a fraction of professional basketball referees, coaches and owners. A St. Louis woman is doing her best to change that. Khalia Collier is owner and general manager of the St. Louis Surge, the region’s only professional women’s sports team.

In her eighth season at the helm of the team, Collier is also the newest commissioner of the Global Women’s Basketball Association, a league of five teams that creates a space for players to have careers beyond collegiate, amateur and professional play.