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President Ronald Reagan delivers his famous "tear down this wall" speech in June 1987 at the Brandenburg Gate. | Courtesy Ronald Reagan Library
Ronald Reagan Library

Peter Robinson had just turned 30 years old when, as Ronald Reagan’s speechwriter in 1987, he was tasked with crafting what would become one of the world’s most famous presidential speeches.

“I spent six years in the Reagan White House and I wrote tens of thousands of words, and nobody remembers anything except six of them — and one of them is ‘mister,’” said Robinson, referring to the memorable “tear down this wall” line that Reagan directed at Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev before a crowd of thousands at the Berlin Wall.

Saturday marks the 100th day that U.S Sen. Josh Hawley has been in the United States Senate.
Courtesy of U.S. Sen. Josh Hawley's office

On the latest edition of Politically Speaking, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum spoke with U.S. Sen. Josh Hawley about his first few months in the U.S. Senate.

The Republican senator was elected to a six-year term last November. Saturday will mark his 100th day in office, which has been jam-packed with some big debates over President Donald Trump’s agenda and administration.

Russel Neiss, a St. Louis-based Jewish educator was one of the creators of the viral @Stl_manifest Twitter account, which recounted the lives of Jewish refugees turned away from the U.S. in 1939 aboard the M.S. St. Louis.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

It was Thursday night, the day before Holocaust Remembrance Day on Friday, Jan. 27, 2017. St. Louis-based Jewish educator and technologist Russel Neiss and his friend across the country, Rabbi Charlie Schwartz, had put their heads together.

Who's St. Louis' NFL team now?

Jan 26, 2017
Bill Greenblatt | UPI | File Photo

Since the Rams went west (and south, if you count their record), who did St. Louis pay attention to in the NFL this season?

Art institutions participate in global Twitter conversation

Mar 22, 2015

An international conversation about culture on Twitter is being joined by The Contemporary Art Museum, The Pulitzer Arts Foundation, The Sheldon Concert Hall and The Kemper Museum. For Contemporary Art Museum PR/Marketing Assistant Liz Deichmann, the event bridges the gap between local and international art institutions.

St. Louis Public Radio

Teachers are using Twitter to gather material and talk about Ferguson.

Marcia Chatelain, a history professor at Georgetown University and a University of Missouri–Columbia alumna, created the hashtag #FergusonSyllabus this week to gather that material.

We have the opportunity to start and take part in many important community conversations on St. Louis on the Air, and many times those conversations continue via other media.

During Tuesday's discussion about the active role young professionals are taking in the St. Louis area, we asked what you and others can do to get involved, and what changes you'd like to see in St. Louis. 

Here is part of the Twitter conversation.

Turmoil In Ferguson, In One Word

Aug 11, 2014

After 18-year-old Michael Brown was shot Saturday, and a peaceful protest turned into a night of looting, arson and violence late Sunday, we asked live-blog and Twitter followers to put their feelings on the one word.

What You're Saying About Amendment 7

Jul 31, 2014

Although several issues and races are crowding Tuesday’s primary ballot, the transportation tax amendment has been particularly contentious. The amendment increases the state sales tax, now 4.225 percent, by three-quarters of a cent to fund transportation projects.

(Courtesy of Square)

With Twitter making its New York Stock Exchange debut today we're highlighting its co-founder's perspective on the company's value in true Twitter fashion.

Here, in 140 seconds, St. Louis native Jack Dorsey shares his thoughts about what makes his company worth $26 per share - and worth using for its millions of tweeters. 

(Courtesy Square Inc.)

One of the hurdles small businesses face is the potential loss of a sale if they don't have the infrastructure in place to accept credit card and debit card payments.

St. Louis native Jack Dorsey, CEO of Square Inc., a mobile payments device company, makes that hurdle easier to jump but he says the company has more to offer than concrete tools of the trade.

Charlie Miller, this time hacking into the steering wheel of a Ford Escape.
(Courtesy Charlie Miller)

There’s tech in your car and tech in your phone. Internet connections in your Xbox and your printer. Convenient. But also a potential conduit to breach your security.

A person with the know-how can even remotely hack into your steering wheel. With his research partner Chris Xavier, Charlie Miller of Wildwood, Mo. recently revealed this vulnerability in cars as part of an enterprise in what he calls "white hat" or "ethical" hacking.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, April 8, 2013 - If tech-savvy individuals want to engage in a cringe-worthy exercise, have them download a full archive of their Tweets.

The results aren’t pretty. When this writer joined Twitter back in April 2008, the first Tweet I hurled through cyberspace was: “This confuses me.” The second missive issued just two hours later – “Things” – probably wouldn’t qualify as a literary marvel, either.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: If tech-savvy individuals want to engage in a cringe-worthy exercise, have them download a full archive of their Tweets.

The results aren’t pretty. When this writer joined Twitter back in April 2008, the first Tweet I hurled through cyberspace was: “This confuses me.” The second missive issued just two hours later – “Things” – probably wouldn’t qualify as a literary marvel, either.

Lawmakers are tweeting up a storm on Capitol Hill

Jan 23, 2013

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Jan. 23, 2013 - WASHINGTON – At President Barack Obama’s first inauguration four years ago, U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill sent her first Tweet, making fun of a “weird hat” worn by Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia.

Since then, the Missouri Democrat has sent out 2,454 more Tweets and amassed 86,659 followers of her personal Twitter account, @clairecmc – making her one of the top Twitterers on Capitol Hill.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Jan. 2, 2013 - Twenty years ago, it was an innovation that ushered in a communications revolution affecting the way businesses, institutions and individuals talk to one another in a way not seen since the invention of the telegraph.

But today, some are wondering what the future holds for email.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Dec. 30, 2011 - Lt. Gov. Peter Kinder's worst political year ever is ending on another embarrassing note, as he attracts national attention for his once-prodigious, occasionally salacious Tweets.

The nonpartisan National Journal has just announced its top five "Biggest Twitter Losers of 2011."

McCaskill continues to embrace Twitter

Jun 15, 2011
(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

In the wake of “Weiner-gate,” in which Congressman Anthony Weiner has acknowledged exchanging sexually suggestive messages and photos through Twitter, Missouri Senator Claire McCaskill says the scandal will not change the way she uses social media.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, June 10, 2011 - WASHINGTON - Will the tweeting travails of U.S. Rep. Anthony Weiner put a damper on the rapidly expanding Tweetocracy on Capitol Hill? The New York Democrat's admission Monday that he had sent lewd photos to women via a personal Twitter account shone a sudden spotlight on the nearly three-quarters of members of Congress who use Twitter as part of their jobs.

On Twitter and hashtags

Nov 1, 2010

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Nov. 1, 2010 -Our Editor Margaret Freivogel and Public Insight Network Analyst Linda Lockhart were at the Online News Association's annual conference, in Washington, D.C., at the end of last week. In addition to the ONA's conference website , I was able to follow the proceedings on Twitter.

Beacon blog: The danger of generalizations

Aug 17, 2010

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Aug. 17, 2010 - Last week, Slate published an article, "How Blacks Use Twitter: The latest research on race and microblogging."  Now, I'll admit that I can't tell you why, but my general sense of Slate is that it's intelligent, thoughtful, edgy. So when I clicked through to the article I expected something, well, intelligent, thoughtful and edgy.

One and a half out of three ain't bad. I found a fascinating piece that was only edgy in its blatant -- yet blind -- wielding of sweeping generalizations.

Beacon blog: The danger of generalizations

Aug 16, 2010

Last week, Slate published an article, "How Blacks Use Twitter: The latest research on race and microblogging."  Now, I'll admit that I can't tell you why, but my general sense of Slate is that it's intelligent, thoughtful, edgy. So when I clicked through to the article I expected something, well, intelligent, thoughtful and edgy.

While the bulk of the Beacon's stories are on www.stlbeacon.org , you might be surprised to learn that you can find our work in many other ways. As I said last week, communication requires a sender and a receiver. It also requires  that the sender transmit in a medium the receiver will actually receive.

One, two, tweet: Tale of three Twitter users

Sep 16, 2009

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Sept. 16, 2009 - In honor of Twitter co-founder and St. Louis native Jack Dorsey’s hometown appearance on Friday, at 10 a.m. at Webster University’s Loretto-Hilton Center, it seems fitting to look this week at the popular microblogging service from several different angles. Following a news roundup yesterday, here are three tales of how St. Louisans use Twitter for business and pleasure. There's an early adopter looking to engage an artistic audience, an actor looking to promote himself and a newcomer to the microblogging service who's still figuring out how her company can benefit.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon Sept. 2, 2009 - Twitter co-founder and chairman Jack Dorsey has more than 1.1 million people following his every tweet. But how many people can say they’ve seen the master of microblogging in person?

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, July 27, 2009 - Amanda Bonnen of Chicago would tweet about the kinds of things a lot of people babble about on Twitter: The hockey playoffs, the Cubs, drinking, friends, "wardrobe malfunctions" and her moldy apartment. It was the complaint about the apartment that got her in trouble.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, July 13, 2009 - U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., sent shockwaves through Twitter world this weekend with one stunning Tweet:

"I do not support a second stimulus," she typed at 9:52 a.m. Saturday.

And 28,630 "followers'' took notice.

Hello, my username is...

Jun 15, 2009

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, June 15, 2009 - In the middle of an event that was equal parts art showcase and social media experiment, Scott Lapp found himself discussing audience metrics. As in, how would he and other organizers measure whether the so-called artRAC Tweetup (a real-world meeting of people who use the microblogging service Twitter) was a success?

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, June 8, 2009 - Thanks to a blog post from Riverfront Times, I came across a group that lives by the mantra, “If you get it, share it.”

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, June 3, 2009 - Even though several news sources reported that Cards manager Tony La Russa had settled his suit against Twitter over fake posts using his name and picture  AP , Twitter says it ain't so, Joe. According to a blog post (not a tweet - too long), "Twitter has not settled, nor do we plan to settle or pay."

Cards manager Tony La Russa apparently doesn't like all birds. He filed suit last month against Twitter claiming that the burgeoning social network caused him emotional distress by hosting a site that contained "derogatory and demeaning" postings on a page falsely claiming that "Tony La Russa is using Twitter."

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