University of Missouri-Columbia | St. Louis Public Radio

University of Missouri-Columbia

From left, Christine Nagel, Abby Whiting and Carolyn Henry joined Tuesday's talk show
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Like many urban and rural areas around the U.S., the St. Louis region has seen a shortage of veterinarians, and it's affecting clinic hours, staffing and wait times in some communities.

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, guest host Ruth Ezell talked with three people deeply invested in the profession and in seeing both veterinarians and the animals they care for thrive.

Joining the discussion were Carolyn Henry, dean of the College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Missouri-Columbia; Christine Nagel, president of the Greater St. Louis Veterinary Medical Association; and Abby Whiting, who currently works overnights and provides emergency and critical care through Veterinary Specialty Services.

University of Colorado Boulder esports student-athletes compete in a tournament last year. The University of Missouri-Columbia is adding an esports team in 2019.
Jeremy Elder | via Flickr

Mizzou’s newest athletes won’t be bruising each other in the football stadium. Instead, they’ll spend hours in front of the screen tapping furiously on keypads.

The University of Missouri-Columbia is joining a growing number of colleges and universities adding competitive video gaming — commonly called esports — to its roster of varsity sports. Mizzou announced last week it will form an esports program beginning in fall 2019.

Lloyd Gaines, who sued to be admitted to the University of Missouri Law School in 1935, which only accepted white students then. His case was a stepping stone to school desegregation.
Lincoln University

Lloyd Gaines never studied at the University of Missouri Law School. Still, his efforts to get in as a black student in the 1930s had a major impact on school segregation laws and African-American attorneys in Missouri.

A U.S. Supreme Court decision handed down Dec. 12, 1938, said the law school either had to accept Gaines’ application or create an equal but separate option. It was not the outcome Gaines and the NAACP had hoped for, but the lawsuit put a crack in the “separate but equal” doctrine established by the 1896 Plessy v. Ferguson case.

Pat Westhoff (at left), director of the University of Missouri's Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute, and Blake Hurst, president of the Missouri Farm Bureau, joined Monday's program.
Pat Westhoff & Missouri Farm Bureau

Recent trade disputes between the Trump administration and China have had a heavy impact on farmers in Missouri, where the soybean industry dwarfs other crops in terms of acreage and production value.

“[China accounts] for something like 60 percent of total U.S. soybean sales in a typical year,” Pat Westhoff, director of the Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute at the University of Missouri-Columbia, said on Monday’s St. Louis on the Air. “So losing a chunk of that market’s a very big deal.”

Blake Hurst, president of the Missouri Farm Bureau, told host Don Marsh that he and fellow farmers have been directly experiencing the fiscal consequences this year, including a 20 percent drop in soybean prices.

George Smith, a retired biology professor at the University of Missouri-Columbia
University of Missouri-Columbia

When retired biologist George Smith picked up the phone at 4:30 a.m. Wednesday, he wasn’t expecting it to be the Swedish Academy.

“It’s kind of a common prank for your friends to put on a fake Swedish accent and tell you that you won,” Smith said. “I thought maybe it was a joke but the line was so scratchy and there was so much interference, I thought nah, it wasn’t one of my friends. They wouldn’t have such a bad connection.”

Through the phone call, Smith, a professor emeritus at the University of Missouri-Columbia, learned that he won the Nobel Prize in chemistry for developing a method called phage display in the 1980s. Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria. Smith used them to create a tool that would help identify antibodies, molecules in the body that identify invading pathogens, that would be the most useful for binding to molecules that are associated with certain diseases.

Marcus Wilson, the executive director for the Monsanto YMCA, gathers with players in their prayer circle. On Saturdays, Wilson allows players to play basketball for free to allow the players a safe space away from violence.
Ryan Delaney | St. Louis Public Radio

College basketball coaches from across Missouri are coming together to discuss the importance of leadership and how they recruit incoming student athletes, just in time for the new school year.

These issues are among several topics that will be discussed at the first annual Coaches Luncheon on Aug. 27, where regional NCAA Division I basketball coaches will  discuss the issues and strengths they see in both students and coaches.

Being a black student at MU, or any majority-white campus or institution, isn’t easy, but the culture is slowly changing for the better. That’s the takeaway from a recent in-studio conversation with MU Education professor Adrian Clifton and Law professor S. David Mitchell.

Both Clifton and Mitchell work on the frontlines to improve the education experience for African-American students, and they joined The Green Duck Lounge playwright Michelle Tyrene Johnson at KBIA recently as part of a podcast for the project, designed to promote awareness and dialogue about Missouri’s civil rights history and current activism.


Illustration by Rici Hoffarth | St. Louis Public Radio

Lauren Coale sends students in her math classes home with videos on how to do complicated algebra or geometry problems.

Instead of lecturing her students, Coale’s class time at Lindbergh High School is free for student interaction, instead of instruction on the overhead projector.

Arianna Soldati,  a postdoctoral candidate in volcanology at the University of Missouri-Columbia, presents a basaltic rock, which she collected from a volcano for her research.
Eli Chen | St. Louis Public Radio

One night at an airport in Syracuse, New York, Arianna Soldati, a postdoctoral candidate in volcanology at the University of Missouri-Columbia, found herself waiting on a continually delayed flight. To pass the time, she opened her suitcase and fished out a bag of volcanic rocks she had collected on a recent trip. Then, she started showing them to people at her gate. 

"Everyone was really excited. Most people have never seen lava before and they had a ton of questions and the delay went by faster than usual," Soldati said. 

Soldati has always found joy in sharing her research with the public, which is why she created a science outreach program this fall to bring science presentations to rural towns in Missouri.

David French
Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio

On the latest edition of the Politically Speaking podcast, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies are pleased to welcome the National Review’s David French to the program.

French was in St. Louis on Wednesday for a Washington University lecture about free speech on college campuses. It’s a topic that’s become more pronounced in recent months, especially after Donald Trump’s election as president.

At an experimental mine at the Missouri University of S&T in Rolla, scientists are setting off explosives around lab mice and cell cultures to study how exposure to blasts in combat damage the brains of military personnel.

Neuroscientists at the University of Missouri-Columbia and Stanford University are leading the research, funded by the U.S. Department of Defense. The study is focused on mild traumatic brain injury, the most common type of brain injury affecting military personnel. However, the condition is difficult to diagnose and not well studied.

 

Mizzou researchers studied fossils of clams called Abra segmentum valves that had been infected by trematodes, collected from nothern Italy.
Scientific Reports

Fossil records suggest that there could be another consequence of climate change and rising sea levels: an increase in parasitic worm infections. 

Scientists at the University of Missouri-Columbia and the University of Bologna studied clams collected in northern Italy that date back to the Holocene Epoch, a time when the planet was warming up after the Ice Age. Parasitic worms called trematodes, also known as flukes and flatworms, would attempt to feed on these ancient clams and the clams would respond by developing pits to keep them out.

By looking at the pits, the researchers learned that the presence of trematodes increased during relatively short periods of sea level rise.

Bombus balteatus, commonly known as the golden-belted bumblebee, pollinates a sky pilot in Colorado.
Candace Galen

A buzzing bee may not sound like much to most people but to bee scientists, there’s a lot to learn from the noises bees make when they fly and pollinate flowers.

On Wednesday, researchers at Webster University, Lincoln University and the University of Missouri-Columbia released a study in the journal PLOS One that concludes that recording bees can help track pollinator activity. That could provide scientists with data to aid conservation of species that have experienced falling populations.

Declines in pollinating species have alarmed scientists, environmentalists and policymakers, since many crops depend on native wild bees.

Gregg Keller, June 2017
Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio

On the latest edition of the Politically Speaking podcast, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies welcome back Gregg Keller for the second time.

Keller is a St. Louis-based, Republican consultant who runs his own firm, Atlas Strategy Group. He’s worked for a number of Missouri’s prominent GOP officials, including former U.S. Sen. Jim Talent.

An adult female bluebird caught by a Southeast Missouri State University researcher.
Kathy Hixson

It’s been nearly 300 years since lead was first discovered in Missouri.

But the element's important role in the state's economy may come at a price to another natural resources. Scientists are planning to study the health effects of lead on local songbird populations.

The research, conducted by biologists at Southeast Missouri State University and the University of Missouri-Columbia, will take place in the Southeast Missouri Lead District, which contains the world’s largest deposits of galena, an important source of lead.

Rici Hoffarth | St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri corn and soybean farmers may see higher yields this year, as scientists from the University of Missouri-Columbia forecast mild weather and moderate rainfall this summer. 

Meteorological records show that dry, mild winters typically are followed by average to slightly more than average rainfall in the spring and summer. 

"The reason why that would be is just a switch in the jet stream pattern and now is the time of the year when we expect there to be wetter conditions in April and May," said Tony Lupo, a professor of atmospheric science at Mizzou. 

Major Garrett.
CBS News

By this point, most have taken note of President Donald Trump’s distaste of the press. But what is it like to be assigned to cover the president under such antagonistic conditions? On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, Major Garrett, CBS chief White House correspondent, joined host Don Marsh to discuss covering Trump during the 2016 election and into his presidency.

University of Missouri students protest a series of racist incidents on the Columbia campus in this photo from Nov. 9, 2015.
Bram Sable-Smith | KBIA

The University of Missouri should emphasize diversity in its recruitment, train professors in the importance of diversity in their courses and increase outreach to improve diversity among faculty and staff, a systemwide task force recommended on Wednesday.

Those proposals were among priority items included in the task force’s report. It was responding to a comprehensive audit of diversity, equity and inclusion practices at the university conducted by the consulting firm IBIS.

The University of Missouri System is beginning a nationwide search to name the next permanent Chancellor of the University of Missouri campus in Columbia.

Hank Foley has been serving in the role of Interim Chancellor since the resignation of former Chancellor R. Bowen Loftin in November 2015. Foley issued this statement Monday, indicating he will apply to the position in an effort to drop the “interim” title:

food waste photo from Mizzou video
University of Missouri-Columbia

You have leftover French fries on one plate and leftover beef ravioli on another.

Sure, it’s not the most balanced meal, but that’s not your concern. What you want  to figure out is this: Which will have the bigger impact on the environment when you toss it into the trash? And how can that impact be reduced?

University of Missouri students protest a series of racist incidents on the Columbia campus in this photo from Nov. 9, 2015.
Bram Sable-Smith | KBIA

The University of Missouri is investigating a report by two black female students who said other students yelled racial slurs at them on its Columbia campus.

L-r: UM System Board of Curators chair Pam Hendrickson, UM System interim president Mike Middleton, Mizzou interim chancellor Hank Foley, and chief diversity officer Kevin McDonald.
Marshall Griffin|St. Louis Public Radio

The four current leaders of the University of Missouri System have announced new efforts to boost diversity on the system's flagship campus in Columbia.

They've set a goal to increase the percentage of minority faculty members at Mizzou to 13.4 percent in four years' time.

Provided by University of Missouri-Columbia/Julianna Jenkins

According to surveys by scientists and avid bird-watchers, many songbird species are declining in the U.S. Losing the birds that provide a natural soundtrack in our backyards is a critical environmental issue, since they also serve to control insect populations and as pollinators.

Melissa Click
KBIA - Provided by Melissa Click

The American Association of University Professors voted Saturday to censure the University of Missouri-Columbia over its treatment of Melissa Click, who was fired after her actions during racial protests last fall.

The columns at the University of Missouri-Columbia.
St. Louis Public Radio file photo

A former Missouri state representative is suing the University of Missouri and Joshua Hawley, a Republican candidate for attorney general, over delays by the university in responding to a wide-ranging request for emails and other documents.

The columns at the University of Missouri-Columbia.
St. Louis Public Radio file photo

The University of Missouri “violated fundamental principles of academic due process” and endangered academic freedom when it fired Mizzou Communications Professor Melissa Click following her actions during protests in Columbia last fall, a new report on the situation said.

U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., speaks a roundtable Monday at Metro High School in St. Louis. She was joined by St. Louis Public Schools Superintendent Kelvin Adams.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill is venturing out across Missouri to gather input and garner public support about making college less expensive.

The Democratic senator kicked off a statewide tour on college affordability at Metro High School in St. Louis. She spent time Monday morning talking with college administrators from local institutions -- including Washington University, the University of Missouri-St. Louis, Webster University and St. Louis Community College.

Melissa Click
KBIA - Provided by Melissa Click

Melissa Click is appealing her firing by the University of Missouri in the wake of her actions during campus protests, saying the school “is using me as a scapegoat to distract from larger campus issues.”

In a statement issued Tuesday by a Texas public relations firm that has been representing her, Click expressed thanks to the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) for authorizing an investigation into her case that could lead to censure of the university.

Melissa Click
KBIA - Provided by Melissa Click

After weeks of controversy that brought threats of financial retaliation from legislators and student protests at a Board of Curators meeting, the University of Missouri has fired assistant communication professor Melissa Click.

The 4-2 vote by the curators came after an investigation of her behavior during protests on the Mizzou campus as well as her actions during the homecoming parade last fall.

A bill in the Missouri House that seeks to ensure First Amendment rights for student journalists received overwhelming support in a hearing Monday night. The so-called Walter Cronkite New Voices Act would require public schools and universities to grant student journalists the same degree of free speech they would a professional journalist.

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