U.S. Census Bureau | St. Louis Public Radio

U.S. Census Bureau

A U.S. Census Bureau representative goes door-to-door to conduct a non-response follow up. 11/22/19
U.S. Census Bureau

Some rural Missourians say they don’t want to participate in the upcoming census because they don’t have time, they don’t trust the government or they’re worried about privacy, according to a report from the Missouri Foundation for Health.

The foundation is trying to increase rural participation, explaining that Missouri could lose nearly $1,300 in federal funding for each person who’s not counted. Researchers found that a lack of understanding regarding the process and purpose for conducting the census is a major barrier to participation. 

International students from Webster University celebrate graduation in 2015. Students are among the foreign-born people who call the St. Louis region home.
Mosaic Project | Facebook

Recent data shows the St. Louis region’s foreign-born population is growing at a faster rate than most of the country’s largest metro areas.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the region’s foreign-born population grew by 5,640 people, or 4.1%, between 2017 and 2018, rising to a total 141,894 people. This population is comprised of immigrants, refugees and temporary migrants such as international students. 

Several St. Louis area nonprofits are preparing for the 2020 Census by ensuring a proper and accurate population count within the city and St. Louis County. Flikr photo of census form.
(via Flickr/lacylouwho)

Leaders of several St. Louis-area organizations and businesses are taking the first steps to prepare for the upcoming United States census.

The Missouri Foundation for Health held the St. Louis Regional Census Convening on Friday. Area leaders met to discuss the tactics and practices necessary to collect accurate data for the next census in 2020.

The study examined over 580,000 patient records collected over a 20-year period and found women were more likely to survive a heart attack when treated by a female doctor than a male doctor.
Maria Fabrizio | NPR

A new survey from the U.S. Census Bureau found the Missouri uninsured rate remained steady at 9.1 percent in 2017 despite several Congressional attempts to gut the Affordable Care Act and the repeal of the individual mandate, the requirement that all Americans have insurance.

Missouri’s percentage of uninsured people is in line with the national rate of 9 percent. The number of uninsured people nationwide has been falling since 2013, when it was 13.4 percent.

The region actually grew slightly from 2016 to 2017, but Baltimore and other cities gained more residents in the same period.
David Kovaluk | St. Louis Public Radio

The latest estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau show that the St. Louis metropolitan area continues to lose ground compared to other cities.

Data released Thursday show the area, which includes St. Louis City and 14 neighboring Missouri and Illinois counties, dropped to the 21st most populous metropolitan area in 2017. Baltimore replaced St. Louis in the 20th position.

This fall, U.S. Census Bureau workers will come to St. Louis to verify, using in part smartphones, the agency's address lists, compiled using a new method. Those lists will help the Bureau conduct the 2020 Census.
U.S. Census Bureau

Illinois got smaller. Missouri got bigger (slightly). And western states seem to have a pull on people looking to relocate. That’s according to the U.S. Census Bureau's annual population estimates that were released on December 20.

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This fall, U.S. Census Bureau workers will come to St. Louis to verify, using in part smartphones, the agency's address lists, compiled using a new method. Those lists will help the Bureau conduct the 2020 Census.
U.S. Census Bureau

If you've ever wondered how the U.S. Census Bureau prepares to count the nation's population every 10 years, a new test being done in St. Louis offers some insight.

The St. Louis region grew slightly in 2014, but the city dropped by about 1,000 people, according to new Census data.
U.S. Marine Corps Flickr page

The latest U.S. Census Bureau data shows the St. Louis region has grown little in population since 2010, but also has remained fairly stable.

(Credit: Sxc.hu Haap Media Ltd)

The population trends in the St. Louis metropolitan area continued in 2013, according to numbers released today by the U.S. Census Bureau.

The census estimates the city of St. Louis had 696 fewer people in July of 2013 than at the same time the previous year, 0.22 percent drop. At the same time surrounding counties in Missouri added population.

Saint Louis University sociology professor Onésimo Sandoval studies demography and said the numbers didn't surprise him. The structure of cities across the U.S. is changing, Sandoval said.